michaelbennetMichael Bennet- CO

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat

Other positions:
Chair, Subcommittee Conservation, Forestry and Natural Resources

Quotes: 
“We must meet the promise each generation has made to the next: to leave more opportunity, not less, for our kids and grandkids.” Michael Bennet

Featured Video:
Senator Bennet Remembers Victims of Boulder Shooting in Floor Speech, Calls for Action

Source: Government page

Senator Bennet urges President Biden to include firefighters in infrastructure bill
Fox 21 News, Dani BirzerSeptember 16, 2021 (Medium)

DENVER—Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet joined a group of senators in writing the Biden administration to urge them to implement the wildland firefighter pay and personnel provisions into the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

While battling historic wildfires across the West, federal firefighting agencies are facing major staffing shortfalls due to a significant pay gap between federal and state wildland firefighters.

In a letter to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and the Office of Personnel Management Director Kiran Ahuja, the senators wrote the following letter:

Dear Secretary Haaland, Secretary Vilsack, and Director Ahuja:

We write today in support of the bipartisan infrastructure bill (the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act) and urge you to prepare for rapid implementation of provisions relating to federal wildland firefighters. Specifically, we ask that your agencies begin working together now to be in position to swiftly implement the pay increase for federal wildland firefighters, the development of a distinct “wildland firefighter” occupational series, and the conversion of at least 1,000 seasonal firefighting positions to permanent positions once this bill is signed into law….

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat

Other positions:
Chair, Subcommittee Conservation, Forestry and Natural Resources

Quotes: 
“We must meet the promise each generation has made to the next: to leave more opportunity, not less, for our kids and grandkids.” Michael Bennet

Featured Video:
Senator Bennet Remembers Victims of Boulder Shooting in Floor Speech, Calls for Action

Source: Government page

News

Senator Bennet urges President Biden to include firefighters in infrastructure bill
Fox 21 News, Dani BirzerSeptember 16, 2021 (Medium)

DENVER—Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet joined a group of senators in writing the Biden administration to urge them to implement the wildland firefighter pay and personnel provisions into the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

While battling historic wildfires across the West, federal firefighting agencies are facing major staffing shortfalls due to a significant pay gap between federal and state wildland firefighters.

In a letter to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and the Office of Personnel Management Director Kiran Ahuja, the senators wrote the following letter:

Dear Secretary Haaland, Secretary Vilsack, and Director Ahuja:

We write today in support of the bipartisan infrastructure bill (the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act) and urge you to prepare for rapid implementation of provisions relating to federal wildland firefighters. Specifically, we ask that your agencies begin working together now to be in position to swiftly implement the pay increase for federal wildland firefighters, the development of a distinct “wildland firefighter” occupational series, and the conversion of at least 1,000 seasonal firefighting positions to permanent positions once this bill is signed into law….

Twitter

About

Michael Bennet

Source: Government page

Michael Bennet has represented Colorado in the United States Senate since 2009. Recognized as a pragmatic and independent thinker, he is driven by an obligation to create more opportunity for the next generation. Michael has built a reputation of taking on Washington dysfunction and working with Republicans and Democrats to address our nation’s greatest challenges— including education, climate change, immigration, health care, and national security.

Before serving in the Senate, Michael worked to restructure failing businesses and helped create the world’s largest movie theater chain. As superintendent of the Denver Public Schools, he led one of the most extensive reform efforts in the country, resulting in substantial, sustained academic improvement for Denver’s children.

He lives in Denver with his wife and three daughters.

Committees   

  • Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry
    • Subcommittee on Commodities, Markets, Trade and Risk Management
    • Subcommittee on Conservation, Forestry and Natural Resources (Chair)
    • Subcommittee on Rural Development and Energy
  • Committee on Finance
    • Subcommittee on Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure (Chair)
    • Subcommittee on Taxation and IRS Oversight
    • Subcommittee on Social Security, Pensions, and Family Policy
  • Select Committee on Intelligence

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

WASHINGTON, DC OFFICE
261 Russell Senate Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-5852
Fax: 202-228-5097

DENVER METRO OFFICE
Cesar E. Chavez Memorial Building
1244 Speer Boulevard
Denver, CO 80204
Toll Free: 866-455-9866
Phone: 303-455-7600
Fax: 720-904-7151

PIKES PEAK OFFICE
409 North Tejon Street
Suite 107
Colorado Springs, CO 80903
Phone: 719-328-1100
Fax: 719-328-1129

NORTHWEST OFFICE
225 North 5th Street
Suite 511
Grand Junction, CO 81501
Phone: 970-241-6631

NORTHERN COLORADO & EASTERN PLAINS OFFICE
1200 South College Avenue
Suite 211
Fort Collins, CO 80524
Phone: 970-224-2200
Fax: 970-224-2205

SOUTHWEST OFFICE
Smiley Building
1309 East 3rd Avenue, Suite 101
Durango, CO 81301
Phone: 970-259-1710
Fax: 970-259-9789

SOUTHEAST & ARKANSAS VALLEY OFFICE
129 West B Street
Pueblo, CO 81003
Phone: 719-542-7550

SAN LUIS VALLEY OFFICE
609 Main Street
Suite 110
Alamosa, CO 81101
Phone: 719-587-0096

 

 

Experience

Work Experience

  • Chief of staff to mayor of Denver
    2003 to 2005
  • Superintendent
    Denver Public Schools
    2005 to 2009

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1964
Place of Birth: New Delhi, India
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Spouse:  Susan Daggett
Children: Halina Bennet, Caroline Bennet, Anne Bennet

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
261 Russell Senate Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-5852
Fax: 202-228-5097

Denver Metro Office
Cesar E. Chavez Memorial Building
1244 Speer Boulevard
Denver, CO 80204
Phone: 303-455-7600
Fax: 303-455-8851

Pikes Peak Office
409 North Tejon Street
Suite 107
Colorado Springs, CO 80903
Phone: 719-328-1100
Fax: 719-328-1129

San Luis Valley Office
609 Main Street
Suite 110
Alamosa, CO 81101
Phone: 719-587-0096

Northwest Office
225 North 5th Street
Suite 511
Grand Junction, CO 81501
Phone: 970-241-6631

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Michael Farrand Bennet (born November 28, 1964) is an American businessman, lawyer, and politician serving as the senior United States Senator from Colorado, a seat he has held since 2009. A member of the Democratic Party, he was appointed to the seat when Senator Ken Salazar became Secretary of the Interior. Bennet previously worked as a managing director for the Anschutz Investment Company, chief of staff to Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper, and Superintendent of Denver Public Schools.

Bennet is the son of Douglas J. Bennet, a former State Department official and president of Wesleyan University. Early in his career, Bennet worked for Ohio Governor Richard Celeste. He went on to receive his Juris Doctor degree from Yale Law School, after which he worked as a law clerk and later as Counsel to the U.S. Deputy Attorney General in the Bill Clinton administration.

Bennet became superintendent of the Denver public school system in July 2005. In late 2008 he was speculated to be a candidate for Obama’s United States Secretary of Education. He was appointed by Governor Bill Ritter to fill the U.S. Senate seat vacated by Ken Salazar when Salazar became Secretary of the Interior in January 2009. Bennet was elected in the 2010 Senate election, defeating Republican Ken Buck. He chaired the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) for the 2014 cycle[1] and was reelected to the Senate in 2016.[2]

On May 2, 2019, Bennet announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States.[3] He dropped out of the race on February 11, 2020, after a poor showing in the New Hampshire primary.[4]

Early life and education

Bennet was born in New Delhi, India. His mother is Susanne Christine Bennet (née Klejman), a retired elementary school librarian[5][6][7] and Jewish Holocaust survivor who was born in 1938 in Warsaw, Poland, and immigrated to the United States with her family in 1950.[5][8][9] Her parents survived imprisonment in the Warsaw Ghetto.[5][10] His father is Douglas J. Bennet,[5][11] who was born in New Jersey, a Christian who served as an aide to Chester Bowles, then the U.S. ambassador to India,[5] ran the United States Agency for International Development under President Jimmy Carter,[12] served as President and CEO of National Public Radio (1983–93), and as Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs in the Clinton administration (1993–95). His grandfather Douglas Bennet was an economic adviser in Franklin D. Roosevelt‘s administration.[12]

Bennet grew up in Washington, D.C. as his father served as an aide to Vice President Hubert Humphrey, among others. He was held back in second grade because of his dyslexia.[5][13][14] He was enrolled at St. Albans School, an elite all-boys preparatory school, and served as a page on Capitol Hill.[15]

In 1987, Bennet earned his Bachelor of Arts in history from Wesleyan University,[16] the alma mater of his father and grandfather.[17] At Wesleyan he was a member of Beta Theta Pi. Bennet earned his J.D. degree from Yale Law School, where he was the Editor-in-Chief of the Yale Law Journal.[18]

Early career

From 1988 until 1990, when he left to attend Yale, he served as an aide to Ohio Governor Richard Celeste.[17] After law school he served as a law clerk for the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals[19] and as an associate to Washington, D.C. attorney Lloyd Cutler.[17] He then served as Counsel to the Deputy Attorney General during the Bill Clinton administration.[20] His father, Douglas Bennet worked in the Clinton White House as well, as Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs. Following a stint as an assistant to the U.S. attorney in Connecticut, Bennet left the legal world and moved West.[17] After briefly living in Montana, he moved with his fiancé to Colorado in 1997.[17][21] Bennet worked for six years in Denver as Managing Director for the Anschutz Investment Company, where he led the reorganization of an oil company and helped consolidate three movie theater chains into the Regal Entertainment Group.[22][23]

While working for Anschutz, Bennet befriended fellow Wesleyan alumnus John Hickenlooper, informally advising the latter’s successful campaign for mayor of Denver.[21] Moving back into public service, Bennet served for two years as Hickenlooper’s Chief of Staff.

The Denver Board of Education selected Bennet as superintendent of Denver Public Schools on June 27, 2005, and he took office on July 1. He had no experience as a school administrator.[17] Under Bennet’s leadership, the Denver Public School system grew student enrollment, decreased dropout rates, and improved graduation rates and college enrollment. Those trends have continued since Bennet left the office.[24] Bennet collaborated with educators and community members to develop the Denver Plan, a commitment to increase student success by focusing on higher expectations, better professional learning opportunities for educators, and deeper engagement with the community and stakeholders.[25] Bennet and the City of Denver also partnered with private philanthropists to increase college enrollment and affordability for DPS graduates.[26][27] The Denver Post said of his tenure, “Bennet has been a force—pushing reforms and steering the state’s second-largest district to a culture of success.”[28]

In 2008 Bennet persuaded the Denver Board of Education to enter into a 30-year, $750 million financial bond transaction with variable interest rates designed to fluctuate as economic conditions changed. According to The New York Times, “In short order, the transaction went awry because of stress in the credit markets, problems with the bond insurer and plummeting interest rates.” As of 2010 the school system had paid $115 million in interest and other fees, at least $25 million more than it originally anticipated.[29]

Bennet was among the many officials whose names were circulated for United States Secretary of Education in the Obama administration, a position eventually filled by Arne Duncan.[30] He and his wife were early Obama supporters during the 2008 Democratic primaries,[31] and he was among those who advised Obama on education issues.[32]

U.S. Senate

Appointment

On January 3, 2009, Bennet was named by Colorado Governor Bill Ritter to fill the seat in the United States Senate vacated by United States Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar on January 20.[19] Ritter chose Bennet after interviewing several prominent Colorado Democrats, and Bennet took the job with the blessing of Hickenlooper.[17] Upon taking office on January 21, 2009, he became the youngest senator in the 111th United States Congress,[33] and he stated that he would seek election at the end of his term in 2010.[34]

In his January 2011 article in Time, titled “Shaking Schools Up in an Already Tumultuous Year,” Andrew J. Rotherham said of Bennet: “If the federal No Child Left Behind Act is modified this year, or if anything else of significance happens in Washington on education policy, this Colorado Democrat will be at the center of it.”[35]

Elections

2010

County results of the 2010 race

Bennet ran for election for a full term as Senator from Colorado in the 2010 election.[36] On September 16, 2009, former Colorado House Speaker Andrew Romanoff announced his campaign to challenge Bennet for the Democratic nomination.[37] Bennet received endorsements from President Obama, U.S. Senator Mark Udall, and U.S. Representatives Betsy Markey, Jared Polis, and John Salazar of the Colorado congressional delegation.[36] He raised $7 million and had a four-to-one cash advantage over Romanoff.[38]

On August 10, 2010, Bennet defeated Romanoff in the primary and won his party’s nomination,[39] facing Republican candidate Ken Buck. The campaign became one of the most expensive in the country, with the candidates spending a reported $15 million combined, and outside groups another $30 million. Bennet portrayed Buck as an extremist conservative opposed to abortion and direct election of Senators, while Buck and the groups supporting him characterized Bennet as a big-spending liberal.[40]

On November 3, the day after polls closed, Bennet was declared the winner and Buck conceded. Bennet won by 851,590 votes (48.1%) to 822,731 (46.4%). He subsequently returned to Washington, D.C. in January 2011 to start a full six-year term. After the election, Obama said Bennet “perfectly reflects the qualities of the ruggedly independent state he has been chosen to serve.”[41]

2016

County results of the 2016 race

Bennet was reelected to a second term on November 8, 2016, defeating the Republican nominee, El Paso County Commissioner Darryl Glenn. Bennet received 1.36 million votes, 156,248 more than Glenn. He received 31,780 more votes than Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, who won the state in the presidential election. Bennet received more votes than any other Democrat in a statewide race in Colorado history. He also won more votes in Colorado’s rural counties than any other statewide Democrat in state history.

Following the election, Obama said Bennet was one of the “gifted Democratic politicians” who could lead the party in the future.[42][43]

2022

Bennet announced that he would seek reelection to a third term in 2022.[44]

Tenure

In the wake of the 2021 storming of the United States Capitol, Bennet called for the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution to be invoked to remove Trump from office.[45]

Committee assignments

Bennet sits on the following committees and subcommittees in the 115th United States Congress (2017–19).

Source: United States Senate[46]

Political positions

Bennet during the 111th Congress

Immigration policy

In September 2009, Bennet cosponsored the DREAM Act (S. 729), which proposed amending the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 by giving residency to immigrants enrolled in higher education programs or serving in the military.[47] In 2013, he was a member of the Gang of Eight, a bipartisan group of four Democratic and four Republican U.S. Senators who introduced comprehensive immigration reform legislation.[48] Their bill, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013, passed the U.S. Senate with a vote of 68-32, but stalled in the House due to opposition from the Republican majority.[49] He later cosponsored the Dream Act of 2017.[50] After President Trump ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, Bennet worked with a bipartisan group of Senators to provide a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers with stronger border protections.[51]

In August 2018, Bennet was one of 17 senators to sign a letter spearheaded by Kamala Harris to United States Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen demanding that the Trump administration take immediate action in attempting to reunite 539 migrant children with their families, citing each passing day of inaction as intensifying “trauma that this administration has needlessly caused for children and their families seeking humanitarian protection.”[52]

In June 2019, Bennet and six other Democratic senators led by Hawaii Senator Brian Schatz sent letters to the Government Accountability Office and the suspension and debarment official and inspector general at the US Department of Health and Human Services citing recent reports that showed “significant evidence that some federal contractors and grantees have not provided adequate accommodations for children in line with legal and contractual requirements” and urged the officials to determine whether federal contractors and grantees are in violation of contractual obligations or federal regulations and should thus face financial consequences.[53]

In July 2019, following reports that the Trump administration intended to cease protecting spouses, parents and children of active-duty service members from deportation, Bennet was one of 22 senators led by Tammy Duckworth to sign a letter arguing that the protection gave service members the ability “to fight for the United States overseas and not worry that their spouse, children, or parents will be deported while they are away” and that its termination would both cause service members personal hardship and negatively affect their combat performance.[54]

Also in July 2019, Markey and 15 other Senate Democrats introduced the Protecting Sensitive Locations Act, which would require, except in special circumstances, that ICE agents get approval from a supervisor before engaging in enforcement actions at sensitive locations, and that agents receive annual training in addition to reporting annually on enforcement actions in those locations.[55]

Environmental policy

In October 2017, Bennet was one of 19 senators to sign a letter to Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt questioning Pruitt’s decision to repeal the Clean Power Plan, asserting that Pruitt used “mathematical sleights of hand to overstate the costs of industry compliance with the 2015 Rule and understate the benefits that will be lost if the 2017 repeal is finalized”, and that science denial and math tricks fail to “satisfy the requirements of the law, nor will it slow the increase in frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, the inexorable rise in sea levels, or the other dire effects of global warming that our planet is already experiencing.”[56]

In November 2018, Bennet was one of 25 Democratic senators to cosponsor a resolution in response to findings of the Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change report and National Climate Assessment. The resolution affirmed the senators’ acceptance of the findings and their support for bold action to address climate change.[57]

In March 2019, Bennet was an original cosponsor of a bipartisan bill intended to mandate that the Environmental Protection Agency declare per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances as hazardous substances that can be addressed with cleanup funds via the EPA Superfund law and require that polluters undertake or pay for remediation within a year of the bill’s enaction.[58]

In April 2019, Bennet was one of 12 senators to sign a bipartisan letter to top senators on the Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development advocating that the Energy Department be granted maximum funding for carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), arguing that American job growth could be stimulated by investment in capturing carbon emissions and expressing disagreement with President Trump’s 2020 budget request to combine the two federal programs that do carbon capture research.[59]

In September 2019, Bennet was one of eight senators to sign a bipartisan letter to congressional leadership requesting full and lasting funding of the Land and Water Conservation Act in order to aid national parks and public lands, benefit the $887 billion American outdoor recreation economy, and “ensure much-needed investment in our public lands and continuity for the state, tribal, and non-federal partners who depend on them.”[60]

Gun law

As of 2010, Bennet had earned a “C+” grade from the National Rifle Association for a mixed record regarding his votes for gun rights.[61] In 2012, Bennet joined then Colorado Senator Mark Udall in asking for stricter gun control, in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. After the shooting, Bennet said, “In Colorado, we support the 2nd Amendment right to bear arms, we support the ability of people to hunt and recreate and to protect their families and homes, and we want to keep the wrong weapons out of the hands of the wrong people.”[62]

Bennet participated in the Chris Murphy gun control filibuster, demanding that gun laws be changed in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting. During his participation in the filibuster, Bennet talked about the 2012 Aurora, Colorado shooting, citing that as a response to the shooting, the state of Colorado closed gun sale loopholes and now requires background checks for any gun purchase.[63]

In response to the 2017 Las Vegas shooting, Bennet demanded universal background checks regarding gun sales and described the shooting as domestic terrorism.[64]

In 2013, Bennet voted against a Senate Amendment 711 to S. 649 (), an amendment introduced by Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) that would have reinstated the federal assault weapons ban. The amendment was defeated 40-60 with one Republican, Mark Kirk, voting in favor and 16 Democrats (including independent Senator Angus King, who caucuses with Democrats) against.[65] Also in 2013 Bennet voted to strengthen the background check system and to ban high-capacity magazines.[66][67]

Bennet owns a shotgun, which he has called a “hunting shotgun”.[68]

Foreign policy

In July 2017, Bennet co-sponsored the Israel Anti-Boycott Act (s. 720), which permits U.S. states to enact laws that require contractors to sign a pledge saying they will not boycott goods from Israel, or their contracts will be terminated.[69]

In March 2018, Bennet voted against tabling[clarification needed] a resolution spearheaded by Bernie Sanders, Chris Murphy, and Mike Lee that would have required Trump to withdraw American troops either in or influencing Yemen within the next 30 days unless they were combating Al-Qaeda.[70]

In November 2018, Bennet joined Senators Chris Coons, Elizabeth Warren, and a bipartisan group of lawmakers in sending the Trump administration a letter raising concerns about the People’s Republic of China‘s undue influence on media outlets and academic institutions in the United States. They wrote: “In American news outlets, Beijing has used financial ties to suppress negative information about the CCP. In the past four years, multiple media outlets with direct or indirect financial ties to China allegedly decided not to publish stories on wealth and corruption in the CCP. In one case, an editor resigned due to mounting self-censorship in the outlet’s China coverage. Beijing has also sought to use relationships with American academic institutions and student groups to shape public discourse.”[71]

In April 2019, Bennet was one of 34 senators to sign a letter to Trump about cutting aid to Central America. It encouraged Trump “to listen to members of your own Administration and reverse a decision that will damage our national security and aggravate conditions inside Central America,” asserting that Trump had “consistently expressed a flawed understanding of U.S. foreign assistance” since becoming president and that he was “personally undermining efforts to promote U.S. national security and economic prosperity” by preventing the use of Fiscal Year 2018 national security funding. The senators argued that foreign assistance to Central American countries created less migration to the U.S. by helping to improve conditions in those countries.[72]

Health care policy

Bennet voted in support of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act signed by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010. In November 2009, when the bill was still working its way through Congress, Bennet said that he would support health care reform even if it meant losing the election.[73] In 2016, describing the healthcare costs in western and central Colorado as among the highest in the United States, Bennet said he “didn’t have answers” and called it “next to impossible” to fix the Affordable Care Act given partisan attitudes at that time.[74]

As part of a group of Democrats proposing “more incremental steps to broaden health care coverage”, as opposed to Bernie Sanders‘s push for “Medicare for All”, Bennet and Senator Tim Kaine have proposed “Medicare X”. Medicare X would “create a public option modeled after Medicare alongside private options on the ObamaCare marketplaces“.[75] In 2019 Bennet and Kaine reintroduced the latest version of the plan, which would also “expand access to tax credits.”[76]

In January 2019 during the 2018–19 United States federal government shutdown, Bennet was one of 34 senators to sign a letter to Commissioner of Food and Drugs Scott Gottlieb recognizing the efforts of the FDA to address the shutdown’s effect on public health and employees while remaining alarmed “that the continued shutdown will result in increasingly harmful effects on the agency’s employees and the safety and security of the nation’s food and medical products.”[77]

In April 2019 Bennet and Senator Chuck Grassley’s Advancing Care for Exceptional (ACE) Kids Act, legislation that creates an option for states and families to provide improved coordination of care for children with complex medical conditions, was signed into law.[78][79]

Cannabis

Bennet cosponsored the bipartisan STATES Act, proposed in the 115th U.S. Congress by Senators Elizabeth Warren and Cory Gardner, which would exempt individuals or corporations in compliance with state cannabis laws from federal enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act.[80] He also cosponsored the SAFE Banking Act in 2019, which would provide marijuana businesses with access to banking services.[81]

In 2018 Bennet criticized the Trump administration for attempting to cherry-pick data to misinform the public on marijuana use.[82] In response, the White House’s Office of National Drug Control Policy committed to be completely objective and dispassionate in its analysis of marijuana.[83]

Bennet cosponsored the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act in 2018 and the Marijuana Justice Act in 2019, a pair of bills that would legalize cannabis at the federal level by removing it from the Controlled Substances Act.[84] He opposed Colorado’s Amendment 64 to legalize cannabis in 2012.[85]

Energy policy

In 2009, Bennet co-sponsored the Solar Manufacturing Jobs Creation Act, legislation that would have provided a tax credit to support solar manufacturing in the U.S.[86] The legislation was not enacted.[87]

He was one of the handful of Democratic Senators who have supported construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, voting for it in 2013,[88] 2014,[89] and 2015.[90]

In February 2021, Bennet was one of seven Democratic senators to join Republicans in blocking a ban of hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking.[91]

LGBT rights

Bennet supports same-sex marriage. He lauded the Supreme Court‘s 2015 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, stating on his Senate website “Marriage is a fundamental right that same-sex couples deserve to enjoy, and now they will have the same rights and opportunities that the law grants to Susan [Bennet’s spouse] and me.”[92]

Bennet is the author of legislation to direct resources to improve the sexual health of older Americans, including LGBTQ+ and rural senior populations.[93] He is an original co-sponsor of the Equality Act.

2018–19 government shutdown

On January 24, 2019, Bennet gave an impromptu 25-minute speech on the Senate floor in response to comments by Senator Ted Cruz. He questioned the authenticity of Cruz’s concern about difficulties that the 2018–19 government shutdown was causing to first responders,[94] recalling that in 2013 Cruz led a shutdown that lasted 16 days at a time when Colorado was experiencing flooding.[95] In less than eight hours the speech became the most-watched Senate floor speech in C-SPAN history.[96]

Agriculture

In March 2019, Bennet was one of 38 senators to sign a letter to United States Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue warning that dairy farmers “have continued to face market instability and are struggling to survive the fourth year of sustained low prices” and urging his department to “strongly encourage these farmers to consider the Dairy Margin Coverage program.”[97]

Abortion

Bennet supports abortion rights and has voted to continue federal funding to Planned Parenthood.[98]

Economic policy

In December 2019, Bennet and Senator Mitt Romney proposed a universal basic income bill for children.[99]

Conservatism rating

The American Conservative Union gave Bennet a 6% lifetime conservative rating in 2020.

2020 presidential campaign

Bennet speaking at the 2019 Iowa Democratic Wing Ding in August 2019

Bennet’s 2020 presidential campaign began on May 2, 2019, when he officially declared his candidacy during an appearance on CBS This Morning.[101] Bennet was previously mentioned as a possible presidential candidate following his viral response to Senator Ted Cruz in January 2019.[94] In February and March 2019 he traveled to early primary states such as Iowa and New Hampshire.[102][103][104] In late March Bennet said he was “very inclined” to run for the presidency.[105]

Following his announcement, Bennet campaigned in Iowa on May 5 and 11 and South Carolina on May 31. He qualified for the first set of debates on June 3, and appeared in the June 27 debate, receiving 8.1 minutes of airtime.[106] He appeared in the second set of debates, on July 26 and 27, this time receiving 10.6 minutes of airtime.[106] He failed to qualify for the remainder of the debates. He also failed to qualify for the Iowa and New Hampshire debate, making him the candidate to fail to qualify for a debate the most times (six).[107]

Bennet received 164 votes in the Iowa caucuses, and 958 in the New Hampshire primary. He dropped out of the race on February 11, 2020, the night of the New Hampshire primary.[108]

Endorsements

Personal life

Bennet with his daughter at the Inauguration of Joe Biden in January 2021

On October 26, 1997, Bennet married Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund attorney Susan Diane Daggett, in Marianna, Arkansas.[109][110] They have three daughters and reside in Denver’s Congress Park neighborhood.[111]

Though not raised in an observant household, Bennet acknowledges his Jewish roots.[112][113][114] He has said that he was “raised with two different heritages, one [that] was Jewish and one [that] was Christian,” and that he believes in God.[5]

His brother, James Bennet, was the editorial page director for The New York Times.[7]

On April 3, 2019, Bennet announced he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent surgery later that month.[115][116] Following the surgery, Bennet’s office said the procedure was “completely successful” and that he requires no further treatment.[117]

As of 2019, according to Forbes Magazine, Bennet’s net worth was $15 million.[118]

Electoral history

Democratic Primary results[119]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Michael Bennet (incumbent) 183,225 54.2
DemocraticAndrew Romanoff154,96145.8%
Total votes338,186 100.00%
United States Senate election in Colorado, 2010[120][121][122]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Michael Bennet (incumbent) 851,590 48.1%
RepublicanKen Buck822,73146.4%
GreenBob Kinsey38,7682.2%
LibertarianMaclyn Stringer22,5891.3%
IndependentJason Napolitano19,4151.1%
IndependentCharley Miller11,3300.6%
IndependentJ. Moromisato5,7670.3%
Total votes1,772,190 100.0%
Turnout N/A
Democratic hold
Democratic primary results[123]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Michael Bennet (incumbent) 262,344 100.00%
Total votes262,344 100.00%
United States Senate election in Colorado, 2016[124]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Michael Bennet (incumbent) 1,370,710 49.97% +1.92%
RepublicanDarryl Glenn1,215,31844.31%-2.11%
LibertarianLily Tang Williams99,2773.62%+2.35%
GreenArn Menconi36,8051.34%-0.85%
UnityBill Hammons9,3360.34%N/A
IndependentDan Chapin8,3610.30%N/A
IndependentPaul Fiorino3,2160.12%N/A
Total votes2,743,023′ 100.0%’
Democratic hold

See also

References

  1. ^ Raju, Manu; Bresnahan, John (December 4, 2012). “Harry Reid taps Michael Bennet to run DSCC”. Politico. Retrieved November 27, 2014.
  2. ^ Frank, John; Matthews, Mark K. (November 8, 2016). “Michael Bennet defeats Darryl Glenn in Senate race in Colorado”. The Denver Post. Retrieved June 26, 2017.
  3. ^ Turkewitz, Julie (May 2, 2019). “Michael Bennet, Senator From Colorado, Is Running for President”. The New York Times.
  4. ^ Turkewitz, Julie; Astor, Maggie (February 11, 2020). “Michael Bennet Drops Out of the 2020 Presidential Race”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Mitchell, Nancy (January 24, 2009). “Bennet’s tale steeped in family roots”. Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on March 1, 2009. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  6. ^ Mitchell, Nancy (January 3, 2009). “Heading back to the Beltway”. Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on March 3, 2009. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  7. ^ a b Phillips, Kate (January 2, 2009). “Denver Schools Chief Said to Replace Salazar in Senate”. The New York Times. Retrieved January 2, 2009.
  8. ^ Sandoval, Michael (October 28, 2010). “Bennet’s Views on Religion”. National Review.
  9. ^ “Interview with Susanne K. Bennet” (PDF). United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. March 22, 2012.
  10. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (March 8, 2019). “Potential 2020 Dem Michael Bennet blasts Omar’s comments as ‘hateful. Fox News.
  11. ^ “michael bennet”. Ancestry.com. Archived from the original on August 19, 2016. Retrieved April 27, 2009.
  12. ^ a b Boo, Katherine (January 15, 2007). “Expectations – Can the students who became a symbol of failed reform be rescued?”. The New Yorker. Retrieved January 3, 2009.
  13. ^ Mitchell, Nancy (January 9, 2009). “One finalist enough for DPS board”. Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on March 3, 2009. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  14. ^ “10 Things You Didn’t Know About Michael Bennet”. Usnews.com. June 14, 2010. Retrieved August 29, 2010.
  15. ^ Vaughan, Kevin (November 29, 2008). “Michael Bennet followed his heart to the mayor’s office”. Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2014. Retrieved January 3, 2009.
  16. ^ “Notable Alumni, About – Wesleyan University”. www.wesleyan.edu.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g Pearlstein, Steven (June 16, 2016). “The can-do senator in a can’t-do Congress”. The Washington Post. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  18. ^ Lach, Eric (January 2, 2009). “Michael Bennet: From Superintendent to Colorado Senator”. The New Yorker. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  19. ^ a b “Official press release from Governor Bill Ritter on appointment of Michael Bennet”. Colorado.gov. January 3, 2009. Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved November 1, 2010.
  20. ^ “Michael F. Bennet biography”. Denver Public Schools Communications Office. Archived from the original on October 22, 2008.
  21. ^ a b Booth, Michael (September 25, 2010). “Bennet’s storied career is marked by adaptability”. Denver Post. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  22. ^ Lane, Anthony (May 14, 2009). “The accidental senator”. Colorado Springs Independent. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved August 3, 2016.
  23. ^ Doyle, Patrick (May 2015). “The Accidental Senator”. 5280. Archived from the original on August 18, 2016. Retrieved August 3, 2016.
  24. ^ “DPS Progress” (PDF).
  25. ^ “The Denver Plan” (PDF). February 1, 2006.
  26. ^ “Denver’s New Privately-Funded Scholarship Program to Be One of Nation’s Largest”. www.denvergov.org. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  27. ^ “About Us”. Denver Scholarship Foundation. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  28. ^ “Superintendent Bennet heads to Senate”. The Denver Post. January 15, 2009. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  29. ^ Morgensen, Gretchen (August 5, 2010). “Exotic Deals Put Denver Schools Deeper in Debt”. The New York Times. Retrieved August 3, 2016.
  30. ^ “Bennet confirms he won’t be Obama’s education secretary”. Denver Post. December 15, 2008. Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved January 2, 2009.
  31. ^ “Obama visits Denver”. Rocky Mountain News. January 30, 2008. Archived from the original on February 1, 2008. Retrieved January 2, 2009.
  32. ^ Wyatt, Kirsten (January 6, 2009). “Colo.’s new senator relatively unknown to voters”. Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved January 7, 2009.
  33. ^ Crummy, Karen (January 2, 2009). “Michael Bennet chosen as next Senator”. Denver Post. Retrieved January 2, 2009.
  34. ^ Rushing, J. Taylor (January 22, 2009). “Bennet Sworn In”. TheHill. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  35. ^ “School Of Thought: 11 Education Activists For 2011”. Time. January 6, 2011. Archived from the original on January 8, 2011.
  36. ^ a b Riley, Michael (September 13, 2009). “Rival Colorado Democrats play game of one-upmanship”. The Denver Post. Archived from the original on September 14, 2009. Retrieved November 1, 2010.
  37. ^ Bartels, Lynn (September 17, 2009). “Sources: Romanoff launches Senate bid: “Colorado is my cause. Denver Post. Archived from the original on September 14, 2010. Retrieved September 18, 2009.
  38. ^ Catanese, David (August 11, 2010). “How Michael Bennet made it look easy”. Politico. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  39. ^ Brown, Jennifer (August 10, 2010). “Bennet Wins, Buck Leads”. The Denver Post. Archived from the original on August 15, 2010. Retrieved November 1, 2010.
  40. ^ Brady, Jeff (October 27, 2010). “Money Has Poured Into Colorado’s Senate Race”. NPR. Retrieved October 29, 2010.
  41. ^ “Obama praises new Colorado senator, Michael Bennet”. CNN. January 3, 2009. Retrieved October 31, 2014.
  42. ^ Remnick, David (November 18, 2016). “Obama Reckons with a Trump Presidency”. The New Yorker. Archived from the original on May 12, 2017.
  43. ^ Obama’s Last Interview,” Pod Save America (January 19, 2017).
  44. ^ Wingerter, Justin (November 3, 2020). “Michael Bennet says he won’t be Joe Biden’s education secretary”. The Denver Post. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  45. ^ Zelinger, Marshall (January 7, 2021). “Colorado Congressional Democrats advocate for removing Trump from office”. KUSA. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  46. ^ “U.S. Senate: Committee Assignments of the 117th Congress”. www.senate.gov. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
  47. ^ Rosa, Erin (April 3, 2009). “Bennet on the record: Supports DREAM Act for immigration reform”. Colorado Independent. Retrieved August 8, 2016.
  48. ^ “Senators Reach a Bipartisan Agreement for Comprehensive Immigration Reform”. The National Law Review. Fowler White Boggs P.A. January 31, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  49. ^ “S.744 – Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act”. Congress.gov. December 10, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2017.
  50. ^ “Immigration | U.S. Senator Michael Bennet”. www.bennet.senate.gov. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  51. ^ “Bennet-Gardner group reaches immigration deal”. KMGH. January 11, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  52. ^ Weixel, Nathaniel (August 15, 2018). “Senate Dems demand immediate reunification of remaining separated children”. The Hill.
  53. ^ “Schatz Urges Investigation of Contractors In Charge of Migrant Children”. mauinow.com. June 26, 2019.
  54. ^ Domingo, Ida (July 11, 2019). “Senate Democrats to Trump: don’t deport military families”. wset.com.
  55. ^ Self, Zac (July 11, 2019). “Bill would block immigration raids at schools, courthouses”. 10news.com.
  56. ^ Manchester, Julia. “19 sens question EPA methodology behind Clean Power Plan repeal”. The Hill.
  57. ^ “Merkley resolution urges quick climate change action”. ktvz.com. November 27, 2018. Archived from the original on February 7, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  58. ^ “U.S. Senators Shelley Moore Capito, Joe Manchin introduce PFAS action plan legislation”. The Journal. March 4, 2019.
  59. ^ Green, Miranda (April 5, 2019). “Bipartisan senators want ‘highest possible’ funding for carbon capture technology”. The Hill.
  60. ^ “Tester, Daines push for full funding of conservation fund”. Havre Daily News. September 19, 2019.
  61. ^ “Michael Bennet on Gun Control”. On The Issues. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  62. ^ “Sens. Mark Udall, Michael Bennet Call For Stricter Gun Control Laws”. Huffington Post. December 21, 2012. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  63. ^ Associated Press (June 16, 2016). “Michael Bennet joins Senate filibuster over gun violence”. The Denver Post. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  64. ^ Clark, Kyle. “Debating the definition of ‘terrorism’ after the Las Vegas shooting”. KUSA. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  65. ^ “U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 113th Congress – 1st Session”. www.senate.gov. Retrieved April 13, 2019.
  66. ^ “United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence”, Wikipedia, February 26, 2019, retrieved April 30, 2019
  67. ^ “United States Senate Finance Subcommittee on Social Security, Pensions, and Family Policy”, Wikipedia, March 22, 2017, retrieved April 30, 2019
  68. ^ “Where the 2020 Democratic Candidates Stand on Guns”. The Trace. June 25, 2019.
  69. ^ “Cosponsors – S.720 – 115th Congress (2017-2018): Israel Anti-Boycott Act”. www.congress.gov. March 23, 2017.
  70. ^ Carney, Jordain (March 20, 2018). “Senate sides with Trump on providing Saudi military support”. The Hill.
  71. ^ “Sen. Coons, colleagues, raise concerns over potential threat of Chinese attempts to undermine U.S. democracy”. www.coons.senate.gov. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  72. ^ Frazin, Rachel (April 4, 2019). “More than 30 Senate Dems ask Trump to reconsider Central American aid cuts”. The Hill.
  73. ^ Stein, Sam (November 22, 2009). “Sources: Michael Bennet: I’ll Lose My Seat To Support Health Care (VIDEO)”. Huffington Post. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  74. ^ Harmon, Gary (May 6, 2016). “Sen. Bennet sheds light on local issues in GJ visit”. The Daily Sentinel. Archived from the original on May 8, 2016. Retrieved August 8, 2016.
  75. ^ Sullivan, Peter (February 25, 2018). “Democrats march toward single-payer health care”. The Hill. Retrieved February 25, 2018.
  76. ^ Levine, Marianne. “Bennet, Kaine set to introduce ‘Medicare X’ plan to expand health care”. POLITICO. Retrieved April 30, 2019.
  77. ^ “Democratic Senators “Alarmed” by Shutdown’s Potential Impact on Food Safety”. foodsafetymagazine.com. January 15, 2019.
  78. ^ Agosta, John; Melda, Kerri (December 1995). “Supporting Families Who Provide Care at Home for Children with Disabilities”. Exceptional Children. 62 (3): 271–282. doi:10.1177/001440299606200308. ISSN 0014-4029. S2CID 143026732.
  79. ^ “Bill Announcement”. whitehouse.gov. Retrieved April 30, 2019 – via National Archives.
  80. ^ “Cosponsors – S.3032 – 115th Congress (2017-2018): STATES Act”. www.congress.gov. June 7, 2018. Retrieved July 7, 2018.
  81. ^ Merkley, Jeff (April 11, 2019). “Text – S.1200 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): Secure And Fair Enforcement Banking Act of 2019”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  82. ^ Holden, Dominic (August 30, 2018). “A Colorado Senator Slammed Trump’s Anti-Pot Committee”. BuzzFeed News. Retrieved June 3, 2021.
  83. ^ Holden, Dominic (October 1, 2018). “The White House Confirms, Yup, It’s Been Running A Marijuana Committee”. BuzzFeed News. Retrieved June 3, 2021.
  84. ^ Jaeger, Kyle (May 2, 2019). “Where Presidential Candidate Michael Bennet Stands On Marijuana”. Marijuana Moment. Retrieved June 3, 2021.
  85. ^ Roberts, Michael (November 19, 2012). “Marijuana: Eighteen legislators ask feds to respect Colorado’s Amendment 64”. Westword. Retrieved June 3, 2021.
  86. ^ “Senators Introduce Solar Manufacturing Jobs Creation Act”. Solar Industry Magazine. November 11, 2009. Retrieved August 8, 2016.
  87. ^ “S. 2755 (111th): Solar Manufacturing Jobs Creation Act”. GovTrack.us. Retrieved August 8, 2016.
  88. ^ Sherry, Allison (March 25, 2013). “Bennet Says Yes, Udall Says No, In Split Vote On Keystone”. Denver Post. Retrieved March 5, 2015.
  89. ^ Schor, Elana (November 14, 2014). “Michael Bennet Brings Senate’s Pro-Keystone Count to 59”. Politico. Retrieved March 5, 2015.
  90. ^ Barron-Lopez, Laura (March 4, 2015). “Keystone Veto Override Fails”. The Hill. Retrieved March 5, 2015.
  91. ^ “U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 117th Congress – 1st Session”. www.senate.gov.
  92. ^ “Bennet Statement on Supreme Court’s Same-Sex Marriage Ruling”. Michael Bennet: US Senator for Colorado. June 26, 2015.
  93. ^ “Bennet, Murkowski, Casey Introduce Bill to Invest in Health Care and Resources for LGBTQ+ Seniors”. Michael Bennet. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  94. ^ a b Axelrod, Tal (January 24, 2019). “Bennet gives emotional speech ripping into Cruz over shutdown”. The Hill. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  95. ^ Daly, Matthew (January 25, 2019). “Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet rips fellow Sen. Ted Cruz’s ‘crocodile tears’ over shutdown”. The Coloradoan. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  96. ^ CSPAN (January 24, 2019). “In less than 8 hours this @SenatorBennet video has more views than any other C-SPAN video from the Senate floor”. @cspan. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  97. ^ Baldwin, Tammy (April 1, 2019). “U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin Calls on Trump Administration to Implement Farm Bill Dairy Improvements for Wisconsin Dairy Farmers” (Press release). urbamilwaukee.com. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019.
  98. ^ “Michael Bennet on Abortion”. OnTheIssues. March 1, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  99. ^ Matthews, Dylan (December 16, 2019). “Mitt Romney and Michael Bennet just unveiled a basic income plan for kids”. Vox.
  100. ^ “Form 3P for Bennet for America”. docquery.fec.gov.
  101. ^ Stokols, Eli (May 2, 2019). “Michael Bennet, senator from Colorado, announces 2020 presidential run, joining huge Democratic field”. Los Angeles Times.
  102. ^ Costa, Robert (February 10, 2019). “Colorado Sen. Bennet hints about joining crowded Democratic race for president”. The Washington Post. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  103. ^ Dovere, Edward-Isaac (March 2, 2019). “The Democrat Who Wants to Stop the Rage”. The Atlantic. Retrieved March 2, 2019.
  104. ^ Garcia, Nic (March 21, 2019). “Colorado’s Sen. Michael Bennet near presidential announcement, sources say”. The Denver Post. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  105. ^ “I’m ‘very inclined’ to run for president, says senator”. MSNBC. March 28, 2019. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  106. ^ a b “Who talked most during the June Democratic debate”. Washington Post.
  107. ^ Astor, Maggie; Lai, K. K. Rebecca; Stevens, Matt; Wezerek, Gus (October 2, 2019). “Democratic Debate Lineup”. New York Times.
  108. ^ Ursula Perano (February 11, 2020). “Sen. Michael Bennet ends 2020 presidential campaign”. Axios. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  109. ^ “WEDDINGS; Susan Daggett, Michael Bennet”. The New York Times. October 26, 1997. Retrieved January 3, 2009.
  110. ^ “Meet Mrs.Susan Daggett”. Daily Entertainment News. May 2, 2019. Retrieved May 2, 2019.
  111. ^ Osher, Christopher N. (December 16, 2008). “Sources: Salazar accepts Interior post”. Denver Post. Archived from the original on January 11, 2009. Retrieved January 3, 2009.
  112. ^ “Michael Bennet”. Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved December 25, 2011.
  113. ^ Kampeas, Ron (July 13, 2010). “In Colorado Primary, Two Jewish Democrats Square Off on Special Interests”. The New York Jewish Week. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  114. ^ Kampeas, Ron (August 12, 2010). “In races for Congress, some Jewish incumbents at risk”. J. The Jewish News Weekly of Northern California. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  115. ^ Littwin, Mike (April 3, 2019). “Littwin: Michael Bennet has prostate cancer, but he still intends to run for president”. The Colorado Independent. Retrieved April 3, 2019.
  116. ^ Max Greenwood (April 19, 2019). “Michael Bennet declared cancer-free, paving way for possible 2020 run”. The Hill. Retrieved April 21, 2019.
  117. ^ Wager, John (April 19, 2019). “Sen. Michael Bennet’s cancer surgery was ‘completely successful,’ spokeswoman says”. Washington Post.
  118. ^ Alexander, Dan (August 14, 2019). “The Net Worth Of Every 2020 Presidential Candidate”. Forbes Magazine. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  119. ^ “Colorado Primary Results”. Politico. August 10, 2010. Retrieved August 11, 2010.
  120. ^ “State Cumulative Report”. Archived from the original on November 29, 2010. Retrieved November 29, 2010.
  121. ^ “Colorado – Election Results 2010 – The New York Times”. nytimes.com. Retrieved August 3, 2016.
  122. ^ “2010 Abstract of Votes Cast” (PDF). Colorado Secretary of State.
  123. ^ “June 28, 2016 Primary Election Official Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved July 20, 2016.
  124. ^ “Official Results November 8, 2016 General Election”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved December 15, 2016.

External links

Educational offices
Preceded by

Jerome Wargow
Superintendent of Denver Public Schools
2005–2009
Succeeded by

Tom Boasberg
U.S. Senate
Preceded by

Ken Salazar
United States Senator (Class 3) from Colorado
2009–present
Served alongside: Mark Udall, Cory Gardner, John Hickenlooper
Incumbent
Honorary titles
Preceded by

Baby of the Senate
2009
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Colorado
(Class 3)

2010, 2016
Most recent
Preceded by

Chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
2013–2015
Succeeded by

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States senators by seniority
36th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2016 US Senator

Michael Bennet (D)1,370,71050%
Darryl Glenn (R)1,215,31844.3%
Lily Tang Williams (L)99,2773.6%
Arn Menconi (G)36,8051.3%
Bill Hammons ()9,3360.3%
Dan Chaping ()8,3610.3%
Paul Noel Fiorino ()3,2160.1%
TOTAL2,743,023

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

BENNET, MICHAEL FARRAND has run in 3 races for public office, winning 2 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $39,278,200.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry
Senate Committee on Finance
Senate Select Committee on Intelligence

Subcommittees

Conservation, Forestry, and Natural Resources
Commodities, Risk Management, and Trade
Rural Development and Energy
Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure
Social Security, Pensions, and Family Policy
Taxation and IRS Oversight

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Congress.gov

Issues

Governance

Fiscal Responsibility

Michael believes we need to work together and make the tough decisions necessary to put our nation’s fiscal house in order. Since his first days in the Senate in 2009, he has been leading the fight for a comprehensive, bipartisan solution to our nation’s unsustainable long-term deficits.

Michael has pushed for a balanced approach that reduces the deficit and demonstrates that we are all willing to make the sacrifices necessary to cut spending while paying for the critical investments our country needs to succeed—just as our parents and grandparents did for us. That is why he voted against the eleventh-hour fiscal cliff package that was passed on New Year’s Eve of 2013. That legislation—like so many other products of today’s Congress—represented the path of least resistance, rammed through without making any of the difficult choices elected leaders are supposedly sent to Washington to do. That is also why Michael fought so hard against the irresponsible tax plan in 2017 that will add nearly $2 trillion to our deficits in its first decade alone—a tax plan that completely missed the mark on what makes our economy stronger, while adding to our unsustainable fiscal burdens over the long run.

As a member of the Senate Committee on Finance, Michael has worked across the aisle on responsible, commonsense legislation to help secure our country’s fiscal future. He has pushed for policies that would reform our tax code to make it simpler and fairer, while raising the revenues necessary to finance our long-term obligations. In 2011, Michael and Republican Senator Mike Johanns rallied together 32 Republicans and 32 Democrats to support a comprehensive deficit reduction package that included discretionary spending cuts, entitlement changes, and tax reform. In 2017, Michael introduced a bill to eliminate the threat of default by ending Congress’s ability to weaponize the debt limit for extreme partisan ends.

During the 2017 tax debate, Michael spoke passionately on the Senate floor about why borrowing from the middle class and future generations to finance tax cuts overwhelmingly tilted toward the wealthiest Americans is incredibly irresponsible. He also spoke about what the trillions in additional deficits that will result from the tax legislation could have financed if it had been put toward real priorities for Colorado and the country.

Washington Reform

Like many Americans, Michael knows that Washington is broken, and he has worked since 2009 to make Congress more functional.

Politicians are public servants who should focus on serving the people—not pleasing lobbyists or fattening their bank accounts. In his time in the Senate, Michael has fought to hold lawmakers accountable to their promises and the rule of law. He supports legislation to stop automatic pay raises for members of Congress and to permanently ban them from ever becoming lobbyists, because he believes serving in Congress is a privilege rather than a gateway for members to get rich after leaving office. Michael has introduced bipartisan legislation that would require senators to stay in Washington during a government shutdown, so they cannot head home and turn their backs on the problems they create. He also supports overturning the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision and placing commonsense limits on campaign spending.

Michael believes that democracy depends on transparency and public access to information. He has lobbied federal agencies to swiftly comply with the Freedom of Information Act, because the American people deserve to know how the government is making decisions that will affect them and their families. He has also been a strong advocate for public disclosure of financial information. The American people must be confident that their elected officials are making decisions that are in the best interests of the nation, not their personal finances. Michael has pressured politicians to fully disclose their financial information and address any potential conflicts of interest.

Civil Rights

Justice & Equality

Michael firmly believes in equal rights for all people, no matter where they come from, what they look like, how they worship, or whom they love. He proudly stands on the side of justice and equality, ready to fight to ensure that all Americans are treated fairly.

FIGHTING FOR EQUALITY

It is past time for federal laws to be entirely free from discrimination. Michael supports the Equality Act, which would explicitly ban discrimination against LGBTQ Americans and add further protections against sex discrimination. In his efforts to create a world in which women are treated as equals to their male peers, Michael continues to call on Congress to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act to close the gender pay gap and secure protections for women’s access to safe and affordable health care.

PROTECTING VOTING RIGHTS

Michael knows our democracy is stronger when everyone’s voice is heard. In this vein, Michael has advocated for policies that not only protect access to the ballot, but also encourage greater participation. He supports expanding voting protections, changing redistricting laws that suppress the voting rights of minorities, and simplifying the voting process through measures, such as same-day registration.

IMPROVING THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

For years, Michael has championed bipartisan legislation to reduce the national rape kit backlog. In 2017, the Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence Reporting (SAFER) Act passed into law, extending the Sexual Assault Forensic Reporting program across the country.

Michael stands behind Colorado’s decision to legalize marijuana and is working in Washington to advance policies that protect both the state and legitimate cannabis businesses’ rights. He has introduced bipartisan legislation to ensure marijuana businesses can access banking services to increase public safety and improve government compliance.

Michael also supports efforts to reform our criminal justice system, which disproportionately affects people of color across the country, by reducing mandatory minimum sentences for low-level offenses and increasing resources for individuals reentering their communities.

ENDING THE GUN VIOLENCE EPIDEMIC

Michael believes we cannot accept the gun violence epidemic in this country as a normal condition of American life. Unlike in Washington, Colorado’s legislators made tough choices after the state suffered two of the worst mass shootings in the nation’s history. After the massacre in Columbine, they closed the gun show loophole. After the tragedy in Aurora, they strengthened background checks. Michael supports legislation in the Senate to similarly close loopholes, improve background checks, and extend mental health services at the national level. Michael views this issue not as taking guns away from people, but from keeping guns out of the wrong hands.

Economy

Agriculture

Michael believes a resilient agricultural sector is vital to a strong economy. This is certainly true in Colorado, where farming and ranching are a proud tradition and generate more than $40 billion in economic output each year.

As a member of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, Michael is working to bring the diverse voices of Colorado to the debate in Washington. In 2014, Michael relied on the input he received from dozens of Farm Bill Listening Sessions held across the state to advocate for Colorado’s priorities in the Farm Bill. Because of that input, the bill strengthened crop insurance, improved disaster assistance, and streamlined conservation programs. It also provided new tools for the Forest Service to increase wildfire mitigation and forest restoration. As he prepares to write the next Farm Bill, Michael will continue to listen to Colorado’s farmers and ranchers to build on this progress and provide rural communities with an even stronger foundation and greater certainty.

In addition to strengthening the farm economy at home, Michael recognizes the importance of increasing access to markets abroad.  As a member of the Senate Committee on Finance, Michael has worked to maintain and improve access international export markets for Colorado’s agricultural products. He is committed to creating a 21st century economy in Colorado that provides opportunities for the next generation of farmers and ranchers.

Clean Energy

Michael believes in an all-of-the-above strategy that transitions Colorado to cleaner sources of energy while growing the economy. He recognizes this moment in our country as an opportunity to modernize our energy system, transition to low-cost renewable sources of energy, increase energy independence, and provide reliable and affordable energy for every American.

In the Senate, Michael has championed Colorado’s status as a clean energy leader. He has fought to retain wind and solar tax credits and led bipartisan legislation to clean up coal emission from plants and expand the market for liquefied natural gas. In 2017, he secured amendments in bipartisan legislation that passed the Senate to protect Property Accessed Clean Energy financing and create a program to train veterans to enter the energy and cybersecurity workforce. After seeing the promise of Colorado’s community solar system, Michael introduced a bill to expand the program so communities across the country can save on their electricity bills by sharing solar energy production. Michael believes that innovation will help solve the world’s toughest challenges, which is why he continues to fight for funding for Colorado’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), ARPA-E, and many other energy programs.

Economy & Jobs

Michael believes the economy does best when everyone has an opportunity to contribute to and share in our country’s prosperity. Over the last 40 years, America has continued to thrive as the most innovative, dynamic economy in the world, and Colorado has been at the forefront of our economic leadership. At the same time, the basic American bargain—if you work hard, you can get ahead—has eroded for too many people.

Incomes for the middle-class have not kept pace with the rising costs of housing, health care, higher education, and childcare. And many rural communities have not benefited enough from broader economic growth and job creation. In too many neighborhoods, grinding poverty has limited our children’s ambitions for too long. Every economic policy Michael fights for in the Senate helps address these challenges.

DELIVERING A HIGH-QUALITY EDUCATION FOR EVERY CHILD

As a former Superintendent of Denver Public Schools, Michael worked to deliver a high-quality education to every child in the city, and he saw how that can prepare our kids for the economy of the future and create the next generation of leaders. As a member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP), Michael is working to expand access to high-quality and affordable early childhood education, improve the quality of higher education, help students graduate college without burdensome debts, and give every child the opportunity to pursue his or her dreams.

GIVING KIDS IN EVERY COMMUNITY A CHANCE TO SUCCEED

Michael has fought to expand the Child Tax Credit by introducing the American Family Act and the Working Families Tax Relief Act, both of which would help low-income and middle-class parents afford the costs of raising a child and make major reductions in child poverty.

SAVING FOR A SECURE RETIREMENT

Michael believes that Social Security is a rock-solid guarantee that we need to protect for every American. He also has introduced bipartisan legislation to expand access to retirement savings options by helping small businesses set up 401(k)s and encouraging employees to participate.

MAKING JOB-CREATING INVESTMENTS IN INFRASTRUCTURE AND INNOVATION

Michael supports smart federal investments in basic research and development that form the building blocks for major technological breakthroughs, as well as upgrading our infrastructure — including roads, bridges, airports, high-speed broadband internet, and public transit. He believes lawmakers should invest in roads and bridges for future generations the way their parents and grandparents invested in the infrastructure we see today.

DEVELOPING A LOW-COST, CLEANER ENERGY FUTURE

Michael believes in a comprehensive energy policy that meets our 21st century needs, establishes aggressive targets for renewable energy and energy efficiency, and includes responsible development of our traditional energy resources.

REFORMING OUR TAX CODE TO MAKE IT ECONOMICALLY COMPETITIVE, SIMPLER, AND MORE FAIR

Michael has been a champion of comprehensive, fiscally-responsible tax reform that makes our tax code simpler and more fair, while encouraging investment and job creation by American businesses in the United States. That’s why he fought against the Republican tax plan in 2017 which overwhelmingly benefitted the wealthiest Americans, not the working families in this country who need relief most, and is projected to add nearly $2 trillion to our debt over the first decade.

FIGHTING FOR COMPREHENSIVE IMMIGRATION REFORM

Michael believes that immigrants are not only vital to the fabric of our country, but also to our economic potential. He was a member of the bipartisan Gang of Eight that negotiated a comprehensive immigration reform bill that passed the Senate with 68 votes in 2013. The nonpartisan, independent Congressional Budget Office found that this legislation would increase our economic output by 3.3 percent by the end of the first decade and 5.4 percent by the end of the second decade, raising average wages and lowering deficits over the long run.

Education

Fighting For High-Quality Education

As the former superintendent of the Denver Public Schools, Michael understands the importance of a high-quality education to a child’s chances of success. Yet more often than not, our schools are failing to prepare the next generation for the 21st century.

Michael believes our country’s competitiveness depends on a fundamental transformation of public education that gives schools and districts more flexibility to innovate and make decisions in the best interests of their students while holding them to high standards for all our children. As a leader on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP), Michael helped overhaul No Child Left Behind, replacing it with a bipartisan law that returns power to states and local communities. Michael also helped secure provisions that reward innovation in schools, support rural school districts, and improve teacher training.

In his ongoing efforts to modernize the higher education landscape, Michael works tirelessly to ensure every student can pursue some form of higher education without incurring crushing debt. Michael supports policies that make it easier for students to earn degrees that prepare them for 21st century careers, including programs for career and technical education. He also has championed bipartisan solutions to simplify the financial aid process and expand year-round Pell Grants so students can finish college with less debt and on their own schedule.

Environment

Climate Change & Environment

Michael knows climate change is not a problem we can push off to the next generation. Persistent droughts and wildfires threaten the businesses of farmers and ranchers in Colorado. Warming temperatures endanger skiing, fly fishing, and hiking in communities across the West. Increasing carbon pollution is threatening the health of our children. Michael believes in a comprehensive approach to combat climate change that includes commonsense actions to reduce carbon pollution and increase the resiliency of our communities, all while growing the economy.

In the Senate, Michael has championed efforts to both protect existing policies that address climate change and implement new, forward-looking measures to combat this growing threat. He is the only senator on both the Senate Democrats’ Special Committee on the Climate Crisis and the bipartisan Senate Climate Solutions Caucus. In 2017, he cast the deciding vote that kept in place standards to reduce methane emissions on public lands, which harm Colorado’s air quality. He fought sweeping rollbacks of climate policies—including the Paris Agreement, Clean Power Plan, and fuel economy standards—and opposed cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget. He also led an effort to standardize the metric that federal agencies use to measure the cost of climate pollution.

Michael recognizes that the corruption of inaction in the current age of polarization will leave a less safe and healthy planet for his children and those of future generations. That’s why he has repeatedly said he is willing to work with anyone to break through Washington gridlock and address the economic and environmental realities of climate change. Two of the numerous bipartisan bills he has introduced include helping the coal industry reduce its carbon pollution and securing federal disaster funding to rebuild more resilient and efficient energy systems.

Conservatism

Michael believes protecting public lands and wild places is an integral part of Colorado’s heritage. It’s why he brought together a diverse group of stakeholders in Southwest Colorado to protect the Hermosa Creek watershed in 2014, and why he has stood up for sacred places and critical wildlife habitat across the country, including Bears Ears National Monument and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Michael puts collaboration and local input at the center of his work to protect and improve the management of public lands. In 2017, after consulting with local community leaders, sportsmen, and veterans, Michael introduced legislation to establish permanent protections for nearly 100,000 acres of wilderness, recreation, and conservation areas along Colorado’s Continental Divide—and to create the first-ever National Historic Landscape around Camp Hale. This follows his years of work across the aisle on forward-thinking approaches to improve land management, address maintenance and infrastructure, and successfully fix the Forest Service’s budget by putting an end to “fire borrowing.”

From hiking to hunting, Michael recognizes that outdoor recreation is vital to Colorado’s economy. In 2017, following a request from Michael and other Colorado lawmakers, the Outdoor Retailer Show moved locations from Utah to Denver, in no small part due to the state’s commitment to protecting public lands. As a member of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, Michael has advanced legislation to increase access to hunting and fishing and ensure all communities have the opportunity to explore our public lands and waters.

Health Care

Fighting For High-Quality Affordable Health Care

As a member of the Senate Committee on Finance and a former member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP), Michael is working to make our nation’s health care system more responsive to the needs of families in Colorado. Michael believes every American should be covered with an affordable, high-quality health care plan. To accomplish this, he is fighting to continue the progress made under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), while also working to decrease costs, support rural communities, invest in research and innovation, and fight the opioid epidemic.

Since joining the Senate in 2009, Michael has worked with his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to pass legislation that modernizes the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), advances medical innovation, and enhances patient access to life-saving treatments. Among these advancements is the Breakthrough Therapies Designation, a bipartisan law that Michael helped pass in 2012 to expedite the FDA approval process for breakthrough drugs and treatments that show dramatic responses early in development. The designation has already led to life-saving innovations in cancer, cystic-fibrosis, and other diseases.

In 2013, Michael championed the bipartisan Drug Quality and Security Act known as “Track and Trace.” The law created a system to track prescription drugs from the time they are manufactured to the moment they are delivered to the pharmacy, helping eliminate counterfeit and tainted drugs from the market. In 2016, Michael secured several priorities in the 21st Century Cures Act, including measures to build on the Breakthrough Designation for medical devices, create a pathway to speed up access to antibiotics for life-threatening conditions, and provide additional resources for mental health services and the opioid crisis. In 2017, Michael again worked across the aisle to pass the Research to Accelerate Cures and Equity (RACE) for Children Act, which will close the cancer research gap between adults and kids, prompting companies to study the most innovative treatments for pediatric cancer.

As Michael looks to the future of health care, he is focused on increasing competition in rural communities and lowering costs with his latest proposal, Medicare-X.  He will continue to fight for better care for children, with bills such as the Advancing Care for Exceptional (ACE) Kids Act, and for resources to combat the opioid crisis, which has devastated communities throughout Colorado. As a forward-thinker in this exciting era of precision medicine and gene editing, Michael will continue his bipartisan efforts to advance innovation and research in Colorado and across the country.

Immigration

Immigration

Michael knows our broken immigration system hobbles our economy, reduces our global competitiveness, and keeps millions of hardworking families living in the shadows. He is fighting for commonsense solutions that reflect two bedrock American values: we are a nation that respects the rule of law, and we are a nation of immigrants.

Michael was part of the “Gang of Eight,” a group of bipartisan senators who worked together to write a sweeping bill to fix our broken immigration system. The group met with a diverse coalition of business, labor, farm worker, faith, and Latino leaders to write a bill that would secure our borders, reform an outdated visa system, guarantee important worker protections, and create a path to citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants. The Senate passed the bill with overwhelming bipartisan support in 2013. This legislative process and language continue to serve as a template for future reform efforts.

Michael has long-supported offering a path to citizenship for individuals who were brought to the United States as children. Michael knows that Dreamers are hard-working Americans who contribute to our economy, strengthen our communities, and are as American as his own children. That’s why he cosponsored the Dream Act of 2009 when he first arrived in the Senate, and most recently cosponsored the bipartisan Dream Act of 2017. When Congress failed to pass the Dream Act, Michael urged then-President Obama to create the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Since President Trump terminated the DACA program, Michael has worked in good faith with his colleagues across the aisle to find a permanent solution for Dreamers. He offered several bipartisan proposals that included a path to citizenship for Dreamers and increased border security. He continues to work with his Democratic and Republican colleagues to advocate for commonsense immigration reforms that support our economy, improve our communities, and keep families together.

For years, Michael worked with leaders throughout Colorado to convene and promote a civil conversation around immigration reform that could inform real and lasting reform at the federal level. The result of those conversations was manifested in the Colorado Compact, a set of six principles that represent a more rational and collaborative approach to immigration policy. The Compact played an instrumental role in guiding Michael during the 2013 immigration debate in Washington.

Michael was part of the “Gang of Eight,” a bipartisan group of senators that worked together to draft the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act. The bill would have invested billions of dollars to secure our borders and better track who comes in and out of the country. It would have created a more efficient, sensible, and flexible visa system to encourage new workers—skilled and unskilled—to contribute to our changing 21st century economy, while safeguarding American worker protections. The bill also would have created a tough, but fair, path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants living in the shadows. On June 27, 2013, the Senate passed the legislation 68-32 with overwhelming bipartisan support. The House of Representatives never followed suit, and the legislation ultimately never became law.

Congress has failed time and again to resolve our broken immigration system because of partisan gridlock. This political reality has resulted in direct consequences for businesses, families, and communities across our country. Michael continues to work to fix our broken immigration system and fight for comprehensive immigration reform.

Infrastructure

Rural Communities

Even though Colorado has been a national leader in growth, job creation, and innovation during Michael’s time in the Senate, too many rural communities have not shared fully in that success. Michael believes our nation’s long-term prosperity depends on a thriving rural America and that we have an obligation to support locally-driven efforts to maintain the health and heritage of Colorado’s rural communities.

In the Senate, Michael has introduced legislation to reauthorize the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) program, which supports schools, roads, bridges, and emergency services in 43 Colorado counties. He also helped secure full funding for the Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program so Colorado counties can carry out vital services like fire and police protection, school construction, and road maintenance.

Michael understands that access to high-speed, affordable broadband is essential to succeed in the 21st century economy. Following years of work with local leaders in Red Cliff and Silverton, Michael helped expand reliable broadband to the communities. To further close the digital divide, Michael continues to urge the Federal Communications Commission to make its funding programs more transparent and level the playing field for smaller, rural providers to compete for federal funding. In 2018, he launched Connect Colorado, an initiative to ensure that federal agencies are responsive to questions and concerns that Colorado’s rural providers have as they apply for future FCC and USDA funding.

Colorado’s coal communities have been hit hard economically by a long-term decline in coal demand that has accelerated over the last decade. In response to this economic reality, Michael introduced legislation to spur investment, job creation, and economic growth in these communities. Through tax cuts and support for high-quality worker training, the Coal Community Empowerment Act would provide coal communities the support they need to thrive again in today’s economy.

Veterans

Veterans

Colorado is home to over 400,000 veterans, and Michael is committed to making our state the best place for servicemembers, veterans, and their families to work, live, and retire. Michael believes veterans deserve timely access to high-quality care in the manner that makes sense for them. Too often, veterans are prevented from accessing their full benefits because of outdated regulations and an unaccountable bureaucracy. Michael has worked across the aisle to introduce commonsense reforms, making it easier for veterans and their families to receive the care they deserve.

Michael worked with his colleagues from Colorado to create a program that allows veterans who live more than 40 miles from a clinic to receive their care at non-VA medical clinics. And, because Coloradans know that 40 miles as the crow flies is not the same as 40 miles through winding mountain roads, Michael made sure the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) used actual driving distance. When he heard complaints that health care providers in the program were encountering reimbursement delays, Michael successfully lobbied for the elimination of a regulation causing the hold-up, expediting payment to providers.

Michael also has partnered with Colorado lawmakers to ensure that the Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center in Aurora will be completed and that future VA construction projects are effectively managed. He has introduced bipartisan legislation to change the culture at the VA, give employees tools to punish wrongdoing, and strengthen protections for whistleblowers.

X
John Hickenlooper-COJohn Hickenlooper-CO

Current Position: US Senator since 2021
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2010 – 2018; Mayor, Denver from 2003 – 2010

Other positions:
Chair, Subcommittee on Space and Science

Featured Video:
9NEWS interviews new U.S. Sen. John Hickenlooper

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-s10PH5OVuA

Hickenlooper wants carbon pricing in Democrats’ budget bill
Colorado Newsline, Chase WoodruffAugust 31, 2021 (Short)

As negotiations over a high-stakes budget bill begin in Washington, D.C., Colorado Sen. John Hickenlooper told constituents in a virtual town hall on Monday that a carbon-pricing mechanism to combat climate change tops his wish list for the legislation.

“The thing I’d like more than anything is to get a price on carbon,” Hickenlooper said. “It would be so much more efficient if there was some sort of a fee, and a dividend of some sort, that would allow us to incentivize and motivate all of these entrepreneurs all over the country … to find cleaner ways of delivering energy.”

Hickenlooper, a former Democratic governor who unseated GOP Sen. Cory Gardner in 2020, said he will press for carbon pricing to be included in the budget bill in the coming weeks and months. The bill is expected to be passed through the budget reconciliation process, which requires only 50 Democratic votes, following the Senate’s passage of a bipartisan package of $550 billion in new infrastructure spending.

“We couldn’t get it into the infrastructure bill,” Hickenlooper said of a price on carbon. “But I think there’s ways we can get it into reconciliation.”

Carbon-pricing schemes have a complicated history in U.S. politics. In 2009, a cap-and-trade system was the basis of the Democratic climate legislation known as the Waxman-Markey bill, which passed the House of Representatives but died in the Senate.

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2021
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2010 – 2018; Mayor, Denver from 2003 – 2010

Other positions:
Chair, Subcommittee on Space and Science

Featured Video:
9NEWS interviews new U.S. Sen. John Hickenlooper

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-s10PH5OVuA

News

Hickenlooper wants carbon pricing in Democrats’ budget bill
Colorado Newsline, Chase WoodruffAugust 31, 2021 (Short)

As negotiations over a high-stakes budget bill begin in Washington, D.C., Colorado Sen. John Hickenlooper told constituents in a virtual town hall on Monday that a carbon-pricing mechanism to combat climate change tops his wish list for the legislation.

“The thing I’d like more than anything is to get a price on carbon,” Hickenlooper said. “It would be so much more efficient if there was some sort of a fee, and a dividend of some sort, that would allow us to incentivize and motivate all of these entrepreneurs all over the country … to find cleaner ways of delivering energy.”

Hickenlooper, a former Democratic governor who unseated GOP Sen. Cory Gardner in 2020, said he will press for carbon pricing to be included in the budget bill in the coming weeks and months. The bill is expected to be passed through the budget reconciliation process, which requires only 50 Democratic votes, following the Senate’s passage of a bipartisan package of $550 billion in new infrastructure spending.

“We couldn’t get it into the infrastructure bill,” Hickenlooper said of a price on carbon. “But I think there’s ways we can get it into reconciliation.”

Carbon-pricing schemes have a complicated history in U.S. politics. In 2009, a cap-and-trade system was the basis of the Democratic climate legislation known as the Waxman-Markey bill, which passed the House of Representatives but died in the Senate.

Twitter

About

John Hickenlooper 1

Source: Government page

John Hickenlooper has spent the last twenty years finding solutions to challenges facing Coloradans. He is excited to continue and expand those efforts in the US Senate.

John started his career in Colorado as a geologist. After being laid off in the long recession of the mid-80’s, along with an estimated 10,000 other Earth Science professionals, he opened the state’s first brewpub in a neglected warehouse district in Lower Downtown (LoDo) Denver. He and his partners started multiple businesses, renovating nearly a full block of LoDo warehouses in mixed-use developments that included 90 units of affordable housing. His company led the renovation efforts of more than a dozen historic buildings in cities across the Midwest.

In 2003, John was elected Mayor of Denver. As Mayor, he focused on bringing people together to get things done, just as he’d done as an entrepreneur. He unified all 34 metro mayors to fund and build FasTracks, at 119 miles of new track the most ambitious US transit initiative in modern American history. John made Denver the first large city to provide quality Early Childhood Education for every 4-year old, initiated the most significant police reforms in the City’s history, and opened one of the first offices of sustainability in the country.

John served as Governor of Colorado from 2011 to 2019. During his tenure, Colorado’s economy recovered from ranking 40th in job creation during the Great Recession to become the number one ranked economy in the country (US News & World Report). As Governor, he expanded health care to half a million Coloradans, established climate pollution limits that served as a national model, and enacted commonsense gun safety measures. He oversaw the creation of the first regulatory framework in the US for the legalization of recreational marijuana, which has become the gold standard for other states.

As Colorado’s U.S. Senator, John will continue working to bring people together to address Colorado’s toughest problems — whether rebuilding a stronger, more resilient economy after Covid, lowering the costs of health care and prescription drugs, or combatting climate change and protecting our public lands. He is honored to work for the people of Colorado.

Committees

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Committees

  • Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
    • Subcommittee on Energy
    • Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining
    • Subcommittee on Water and Power
  • Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions
    • Subcommittee on Children and Families
    • Subcommittee on Employment and Workplace Safety (Chair)
  • Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Aviation Safety, Operations, and Innovation
    • Subcommittee on Communications, Media, and Broadband
    • Subcommittee on Space and Science (Chair)
    • Subcommittee on Tourism, Trade and Export Promotion
  • Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Offices

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Wikipedia, YouTube, LinkedIn, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

John Wright Hickenlooper Jr.[1] (/ˈhɪkənlpər/; born February 7, 1952) is an American politician, businessman, and geologist serving as the junior United States Senator from Colorado since 2021. A member of the Democratic Party, Hickenlooper was mayor of Denver from 2003 to 2011 and governor of Colorado from 2011 to 2019.

Born in Narberth, Pennsylvania, Hickenlooper is a graduate of Wesleyan University. After a career as a petroleum geologist, he co-founded the Wynkoop Brewing Company in Denver in 1988. Hickenlooper was elected the 43rd mayor of Denver in 2003, serving two terms. After incumbent governor Bill Ritter said that he would not seek reelection, Hickenlooper announced his intention to run for the Democratic nomination in January 2010. He won an uncontested primary and faced Constitution Party nominee Tom Tancredo and Republican Party nominee Dan Maes in the general election. Hickenlooper won with 51% of the vote and was reelected in 2014, defeating Republican Bob Beauprez.

As governor, he introduced universal background checks and banned high-capacity magazines in the wake of the 2012 Aurora, Colorado shooting. He expanded Medicaid under the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, halving the rate of uninsured people in the state. Having initially opposed marijuana legalization, he has gradually come to support it.

He sought the Democratic nomination for president of the United States in 2019 but dropped out before primaries were held. He subsequently ran for the U.S. Senate, winning the Democratic nomination and the general election, defeating incumbent Republican Cory Gardner.[2] At 68, Hickenlooper became the oldest first-term senator to represent Colorado and the only Quaker member of Congress.[3]

Early life, education, and career

Hickenlooper was born in Narberth, Pennsylvania, a middle-class area of the suburban Main Line of Philadelphia.[4] He is the son of Anne Doughten (née Morris) Kennedy and John Wright Hickenlooper.[5][6][7][8] His great-grandfather Andrew Hickenlooper was a Union general, and his grandfather Smith Hickenlooper was a United States federal judge.[9][10]
Hickenlooper was raised by his mother from a young age after his father’s death. A 1970 graduate of The Haverford School, an independent boys school in Haverford, Pennsylvania, he went on to attend Wesleyan University, where he received a B.A. in English in 1974 and a master’s degree in geology in 1980.[11][12] He recounted first smoking pot when he was 16 and using lithium carbonate capsules to go through with his final exam.[13]

Hickenlooper worked as a geologist in Colorado for Buckhorn Petroleum in the early 1980s. When Buckhorn was sold, Hickenlooper was laid off in 1986.[14] He and five business partners opened the Wynkoop Brewing Company brewpub in October 1988 after raising startup funds from dozens of friends and family along with a Denver economic development office loan. The Wynkoop was one of the first brewpubs in the United States. By 1996, Westword reported that Denver had more brewpubs per capita than any other city.[15] He alleges his restaurant was the first to offer a designated driver program in Colorado.[16]

In 1989, Hickenlooper was arrested in Denver for “driving while impaired” and did community service.[13][16]

Mayor of Denver

In 2003, Hickenlooper ran for mayor of Denver.[17] Campaigning on his business experience, he developed a series of creative television ads that separated him from the rest of the crowded field, including one in which he addressed unhappiness over a recent increase in parking rates by walking the streets to “feed” meters.[17] He won the election and in July 2003 he took office as the 43rd mayor of Denver.[18] TIME Magazine named him one of America’s five best big-city mayors in 2005.[19]

On taking office, Hickenlooper inherited a “$70 million budget deficit, the worst in city history”, which he was able to eliminate in his first term “without major service cuts or layoffs”, according to Time.[19][20] He won bipartisan support for a multibillion dollar mass public transit project, intended in part to attract investment and funded by a voter-approved sales tax increase.[21][20][22]

In 2003, Hickenlooper announced a ten-year plan to end homelessness in Denver, citing it as one of the issues that prompted him to run for mayor.[23][24][25] 280 U.S. cities announced similar plans. The effort did not end homelessness in Denver, and in 2015 Denver’s city auditor “released a scathing audit faulting the plan’s implementation.”[26] The head of the agency responsible defended the program, saying it was “still housing 300-400 people a month in varying ways”, while Hickenlooper argued that the point of such an ambitious target was to focus attention and resources on the problem.[26] In his governor’s budget request for 2017–18, he asked lawmakers to allocate $12.3 million from taxes on marijuana to building homes for chronically homeless people.[24][23]

Hickenlooper established the Denver Scholarship Foundation, providing needs-based college scholarships to high school graduates.[27]

In May 2007, Hickenlooper was reelected with 88% of the vote.[28] He resigned as mayor just before his inauguration as governor.

2008 Democratic National Convention

Hickenlooper speaks on the first day of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver.

Hickenlooper was an executive member of the Denver 2008 Convention Host Committee and helped lead the successful campaign for Denver to host the 2008 Democratic National Convention, which was also the centennial anniversary of the city’s hosting of the 1908 Democratic National Convention.

In a controversial move decried by critics as breaching partisan ethics, the Hickenlooper administration arranged for the DNC host committee, a private nonprofit organization, to get untaxed fuel from Denver city-owned pumps, saving them $0.404 per US gallon ($0.107/l).[29] Once the arrangement came to light, the host committee agreed to pay taxes on the fuel already consumed and on all future fuel purchases.[30] Also, Coors brewing company, based in Golden, Colorado, used “waste beer” to provide the ethanol to power a fleet of FlexFuel vehicles used during the convention.[31]

Governor of Colorado

Hickenlooper in February 2012

Elections

2010

Hickenlooper was viewed as a possible contender for governor of Colorado in the November 2006 election to replace term-limited Republican governor Bill Owens. Despite a “Draft Hick” campaign, he announced on February 6, 2006, that he would not run for governor. Later, he supported Democratic candidate Bill Ritter, Denver’s former district attorney, who was subsequently elected.[32]

After Ritter announced on January 6, 2010, that he would step down at the end of his term, Hickenlooper was cited as a potential candidate for governor.[33] He said that if Salazar mounted a bid for governor, he would likely not challenge him in a Democratic primary.[34] On January 7, 2010, Salazar confirmed that he would not run for governor in 2010 and endorsed Hickenlooper.[35] On January 12, 2010, media outlets reported that Hickenlooper would begin a campaign for governor.[36] On August 5, 2010, he selected CSU-Pueblo president Joseph A. Garcia as his running mate.[37] Hickenlooper was elected with 51% of the vote, ahead of former congressman Tom Tancredo, running on the American Constitution Party ticket, who finished with 36.4% of the vote.[38]

2014

Hickenlooper won a tightly contested gubernatorial election with a plurality of 49.0% of the vote against Republican businessman Bob Beauprez.[39]

Tenure

On January 11, 2011, Hickenlooper was sworn in as the 42nd governor of Colorado after winning by 15 points. He was the second Denver mayor ever elected governor. His victory was a landslide despite Democrats’ poor results overall in the 2010 elections. Republicans flipped twelve governorships nationwide in 2010.[5] NPR described Hickenlooper as having a “pro-business centrist profile” and as “known to try to build consensus and compromise on tough issues”,[40] while 5280 called him as “one of those unicorn-rare, truly apolitical politicians”, noting support from business leaders and some Republicans.[5][20]

On December 4, 2012, Hickenlooper was elected to serve as vice chair of the Democratic Governors Association.[41]

On August 25, 2017, it was reported that Republican Governor of Ohio John Kasich was considering the possibility of a 2020 unity ticket to run against Donald Trump, with Hickenlooper as vice president.[42]

Constitutionally limited to two consecutive terms,[43] Hickenlooper could not run for governor in 2018.

On June 5, 2020, the Colorado Independent Ethics Commission fined Hickenlooper $2,750 for twice violating Colorado’s gift ban as governor.[44][45] Hickenlooper received a flight on a private jet owned by homebuilder and donor Larry Mizel, the founder of MDC Holdings.[46] He also received private security and a ride to the airport in a Maserati limousine on a trip to the Bilderberg Meetings in Italy.[47] The state spent an estimated $127,000 in attorney’s fees investigating the violation.[45]

U.S. Senate

Elections

2020

Hickenlooper had previously been considered the front-runner to fill the United States Senate seat to be vacated by Ken Salazar upon his confirmation as Secretary of the Interior in the Obama administration.[48] He confirmed his interest in the seat.[49] But on January 3, 2009, Governor Bill Ritter appointed Denver Public Schools Superintendent Michael Bennet to the position.[50] Bennet previously served as Hickenlooper’s chief of staff.

In a YouTube video published to his campaign channel on August 22, 2019, Hickenlooper announced that he would run for the United States Senate in 2020.[51] Some preliminary polling data showed him with a substantial lead against incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Cory Gardner.[52] Hickenlooper was also leading the Democratic primary field by a fairly wide margin before he announced.[53] He was quickly endorsed by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, a move protested by candidates already running before Hickenlooper’s entry.[54]

On June 30, Hickenlooper defeated former state house Speaker Andrew Romanoff in the Democratic primary,[55] winning the nomination to challenge one-term incumbent Republican Cory Gardner.[56] He defeated Gardner by 9 points[57] and took office on January 3, 2021.

Tenure

In the wake of the 2021 storming of the United States Capitol, Hickenlooper said he would support efforts to remove Donald Trump from office, in line with most of his party.[58]

Committee assignments

2020 presidential campaign

Hickenlooper speaking to the California Democratic Party State Convention in June 2019.

On March 4, 2019, Hickenlooper announced his campaign to seek the Democratic nomination for president of the United States in 2020.[61][62][63] His candidacy had been a matter of media speculation for months before his announcement.[64][65] Hickenlooper formally launched his campaign on March 7, 2019, in Denver, Colorado.[66] A video titled “Stand Tall” was released to announce the campaign and outline his reasons for running.[63] Hickenlooper formed Giddy Up PAC in 2018 in anticipation of a presidential campaign, raising more than $600,000 in the midterm cycle.[67] The campaign struggled to gain traction in the crowded and increasingly competitive Democratic presidential primary field, and Hickenlooper ended his candidacy in a YouTube video on August 15, 2019.[68][69][70]

Political positions

Hickenlooper during the World Economic Forum 2013

Capital punishment

In 2013, a campaign sought clemency for Nathan Dunlap, a black man facing execution for the 1993 murder of four people, with three former jurors saying they would not have voted for the death penalty had they known of his undiagnosed mental illness, while the mother of a victim, a former co-worker of Dunlap, and the Arapahoe County District Attorney urged Hickenlooper to let the execution take place.[71][72] Hickenlooper granted Dunlap a reprieve, reversible by a future governor, citing inequity in the legal system and the evidence against capital punishment’s effectiveness as a deterrent, saying, “It is a legitimate question whether we as a state should be taking lives”.[71][73]

In Hickenlooper’s 2016 memoir, he came out against the death penalty, saying his views had changed after he became more familiar with the research showing bias against minorities and people with mental illnesses.[74]

Disaster recovery

In May 2014, Hickenlooper signed five bills related to disaster relief in the wake of flooding and wildfires. The bills funded grants to remove flood debris from watersheds and to repair flood-damaged schools and damaged wastewater and drinking water systems. They also exempted people who lost homes from having to pay property taxes and out-of-state disaster workers from having to pay Colorado state income tax.[75]

Drug policy

In 2006, Denver voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis, becoming one of the first major U.S. cities to do so. Hickenlooper opposed the initiative, and said it would not override state law, which punished possession with a $100 fine.[76] In 2012, he opposed Amendment 64, which made Colorado the first state along with Washington to allow the sale and recreational use of cannabis, but worked with the state legislature to enact the decision.[77] A year after the measures came into effect, he said, “You don’t want to be the first person to do something like this”, telling other governors to “wait a couple of years” until a clear regulatory framework had been established.[78]

As Colorado’s new laws have been implemented and the results become more clear, Hickenlooper’s views have evolved. In May 2016, he said that Colorado’s approach to cannabis legalization was “beginning to look like it might work”.[79] In 2019, he said he would be happy to decriminalize cannabis at a federal level if he became president.[80] He also said that the federal government should not stop states from decriminalizing currently illicit drugs beyond marijuana, as well as allowing for safe, supervised injection sites.[81]

Economic policy

In March 2014, Hickenlooper signed House Bill 1241, which funded the Rural Economic Development Initiative (REDI).[82]

In 2016, Hickenlooper launched a program called Skillful, with the help of LinkedIn and the Markle Foundation. The program uses online tools and on-the-ground advisors to help businesses create job descriptions to tap into a wider job pool and help job seekers fill high-need jobs and connect them with job training.[83] Twenty other states are now following. In 2017, Skillful added the Governors Coaching Corps. program, a career coaching initiative operated out of workforce center, community colleges, and nonprofits, with the help of a $25.8 million grant from Microsoft.[84]

Hickenlooper calls himself “a fiscal conservative.” He has said, “I don’t think the government needs to be bigger. I think the government’s got to work, and people have got to believe in government, and I think that’s part of the problem,” and “I think what a lot of Americans want is better government, not bigger government.”[20]

Energy and environment

Hickenlooper’s administration created the first methane-capture regulations for oil and gas companies in the entire country. The rules prevented 95% of volatile organic compounds and methane from leaking from hydraulic fracturing wells.[85] The rules were later used as blueprints for California, Canada, and the federal government’s own new rules.[86]

After Trump announced that the United States would leave the Paris Climate Accord, Hickenlooper joined more than a dozen other states in retaining the accord’s greenhouse gas emission reduction goals.[87]

NPR has called Hickenlooper a “strong supporter of Colorado’s oil and gas industry”.[40] Unlike most Democrats, he supports hydraulic fracking, a controversial oil and natural gas extraction process.[88] Before politics, Hickenlooper was a geologist. He believes fracking is a beneficial practice with minimal environmental harm, even testifying in a 2013 hearing before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources that he had drunk a glass of fracking fluid produced by Halliburton.[23][89]

In February 2021, Hickenlooper was one of seven Democratic U.S. Senators to join Republicans in blocking a ban of hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking.[90]

Gun control

Exactly eight months after the 2012 mass shooting in Aurora, Colorado, Hickenlooper signed bills into law requiring universal background checks on all gun transfers in Colorado except gifts between immediate family members and banning magazines with more than 15 rounds.[91][92] Although most Coloradans supported the measures, according to polling by the Denver Post,[91] the bills’ opponents gathered enough signatures to trigger special elections leading to the ousting of Democratic state senators John Morse and Angela Giron and the resignation of Evie Hudak.[93]

Hickenlooper was a member of Mayors Against Illegal Guns until 2011.[94] In 2018, he supported a Red Flag or Extreme Risk Protection Order Bill in the legislature that would have allowed judges to temporally restrict firearm access to those deemed a significant risk to themselves or others.[95] The GOP-controlled State Senate never let the bill out of committee that legislative session.[96]

Hickenlooper in 2015

Health care

Hickenlooper expanded Medicaid and established Colorado’s health insurance marketplace, Connect for Health Colorado, through the provisions of the Affordable Care Act. The state’s uninsured rate dropped from 14.3% in 2013 to 6.5% in 2017. Approximately 350,000 Coloradans, about a quarter of whom are undocumented immigrants and thus ineligible for public insurance, remained without insurance coverage. The price of health insurance coverage continued to rise in Colorado, which has some of the highest premiums in the nation.[97]

Immigration

As governor, Hickenlooper signed legislation granting in-state tuition to Dreamers (DACA) and joined a lawsuit to stop the Trump administration from ending DACA.[98] During his 2019 campaign for President, Hickenlooper described the Trump administration family separation policy as ″kidnapping″ and said it would be ″crazy″ to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants.[99]

Hickenlooper voted against providing economic support to undocumented immigrants during the COVID-19 pandemic on February 4, 2021.[100][101]

Sex work

In March 2019, Hickenlooper said he supported legalizing sex work and regulating “where there are norms and protections”.[81][102]

Personal life

Hickenlooper with his wife Robin at the Inauguration of Joe Biden

Hickenlooper married Robin Pringle on January 16, 2016.[103] His first wife, Helen Thorpe, is a writer whose work has been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, George, and Texas Monthly. Before they separated, they lived in Denver’s Park Hill neighborhood with their son, Teddy.[104] Upon taking office as governor, Hickenlooper and his family decided to maintain their private residence instead of moving to the Colorado Governor’s Mansion.[105] On July 31, 2012, Hickenlooper announced that he and Thorpe were divorcing after 10 years of marriage.[106] After the divorce, Hickenlooper moved into the Governor’s Mansion.

Hickenlooper is of partial Dutch descent.[107] His mother’s family were practicing Quakers. He spent a summer in his teens volunteering with the American Friends Service Committee in Robbinston, Maine, helping establish a volunteer-run free school.[108] In 2010, Hickenlooper told The Philadelphia Inquirer that he and Thorpe attended Quaker meetings and tried to live by Quaker values.[109] In a 2018 speech to the Economic Club of Chicago, Hickenlooper said “I’m not a Quaker”, but spoke about the role of Quaker teaching in his approach to government.[110]

A cousin, George Hickenlooper (1963–2010) was an Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker.[111] He is the great-grandson of Civil War Brivet Brigadier General Andrew Hickenlooper and the grandson of federal judge Smith Hickenlooper. Other relatives include pianist Olga Samaroff (née Lucy Mary Olga Agnes Hickenlooper), the first wife of conductor Leopold Stokowski, and great-uncle Bourke Hickenlooper, who served as governor of Iowa and a U.S. senator from Iowa.[112][113]

Writer Kurt Vonnegut was a friend of Hickenlooper’s father. Meeting later in life, Vonnegut offered advice that came to guide Hickenlooper’s life: “Be very careful who you pretend to be, because that’s who you’re going to be.”[20]

In his 2016 memoir, Hickenlooper mentioned that he watched the 1972 pornographic movie Deep Throat with his mother alongside one of his friends.[13][114] He later recounted the event during his 2020 presidential campaign.[114]

Hickenlooper is an avid squash player and continues to compete as a ranked player in national tournaments.[115]

Hickenlooper lives with prosopagnosia, commonly known as “face blindness”.[116]

As of 2019 Hickenlooper’s net worth was more than $8 million.[117][118]

On August 19, 2021, Hickenlooper along with fellow senators Roger Wicker and Angus King tested positive for COVID-19.[119][120]

In popular culture

  • Hickenlooper appears in Kurt Vonnegut‘s novel Timequake.[121] The author had been college friends with Hickenlooper’s father.
  • For a 2004 roast of the then-mayor of Denver, Vonnegut declared in a joke video that he was Hickenlooper’s real father.[122]
  • In November 2012, Esquire interviewed Hickenlooper as one of the “Americans of the Year 2012”.[123]
  • Hickenlooper made a cameo appearance in his cousin George Hickenlooper’s 2010 film Casino Jack.[124][125]

Electoral history

References

  1. ^ “MacDonald, Anne Morris”. The Philadelphia Inquirer. April 6, 2003. Death notice. MACDONALD, ANNE MORRIS, age 82, of Dunwoody Village, Newtown Square, PA. On April 3, 2003. Beloved wife of William M. Macdonald, loving mother of Elizabeth Kennedy Hollins, Sydney Morris Kennedy, Deborah Hickenlooper Rohan and John W. Hickenlooper, Jr.; also survived by 4 grandchildren, sister of Maysie Morris Henrotin, Jane Morris Stewart-Clark and Helen Morris Blackwood.
  2. ^ Pramuk, Jacob (November 3, 2020). “John Hickenlooper projected to win Colorado Senate race, a pickup for Democrats”. CNBC.
  3. ^ Luning, Ernest (December 29, 2020). “TRAIL MIX | Superlatives pile up in record-shattering 2020 election”. Colorado Politics. Retrieved December 29, 2020. At 68, Hickenlooper is the oldest Coloradan to first win election to the U.S. Senate.
  4. ^ Lizza, Ryan (May 13, 2013). “The Middleman: Colorado’s Governor Finds Himself Leading His State to the Left”. The Political Scene. The New Yorker. 89 (13): 26–31. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c Potter, Maximillian (July 24, 2012). “The Happy Shrewdness of John W. Hickenlooper”. 5280. Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  6. ^ “Briefing: Denver”. Rocky Mountain News. Scripps Interactive Newspapers Group. April 4, 2003. Retrieved May 15, 2016.
  7. ^ “Mrs. Anne Kennedy Engaged”. The New York Times. May 9, 1948.
  8. ^ Hickenlooper, John; Potter, Maximillian (May 24, 2016). The Opposite of Woe: My Life in Beer and Politics. Penguin. ISBN 9781101981689 – via Google Books.
  9. ^ “Gov. Hickenlooper “Civil War: The Untold Story”. Archived from the original on May 6, 2014. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  10. ^ Hickenlooper, John; Potter, Maximillian (2016). The Opposite of Woe, My Life in Beer and Politics. New York: Penguin Press. pp. 37, 112.
  11. ^ Bedingfield, Steve (October 13, 2010). “How Old is John Hickenlooper?”. Politics Daily. Archived from the original on October 29, 2010. Retrieved September 30, 2011.
  12. ^ Millward, David (June 27, 2019). “Democrats 2020: John Hickenlooper, geologist turned brewer with eyes on the White House”. The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved August 24, 2019.
  13. ^ a b c Frank, John (May 24, 2016). “Gov. John Hickenlooper reveals secrets in book that puts him in national spotlight”. The Denver Post. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  14. ^ Politico (2011). “Arena Profile: Gov. John Hickenlooper”. politico.com. Archived from the original on July 16, 2018.
  15. ^ Calhoun, Patricia (May 2, 1996). “Through a Glass, Darkly”. Westword. Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  16. ^ a b Hickenlooper, John; Potter, Maximillian (2016). The Opposite of Woe, My Life in Beer and Politics. New York: Penguin Press. p. 183.
  17. ^ a b Bohlen, Teague (August 15, 2020). “John Hickenlooper’s Ten Greatest Political Moments”. Westword. Denver, CO.
  18. ^ Farer, Paola (July 21, 2003). “Hickenlooper makes more appointments”. KUSA TV. Denver, CO.
  19. ^ a b Fonda, Daren (April 18, 2005). “Able Amateur”. Time. ISSN 0040-781X. Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  20. ^ a b c d e Alberta, Tim. “John Hickenlooper Is Running for President As Himself. Uh-oh”. POLITICO Magazine. Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  21. ^ Johnson, Fawn (October 1, 2014). “How Denver Leaders Pulled Off a Public Transit Miracle”. The Atlantic.
  22. ^ Whaley, Monte (January 30, 2015). “Denver is being transformed by FasTracks, 10 years after key vote”. The Denver Post.
  23. ^ a b c Hadar, Roey (March 4, 2019). “Gov. John Hickenlooper: 7 things you need to know about the 2020 Democrat”. Washington Week. PBS. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  24. ^ a b Frank, John (November 27, 2016). “Gov. Hickenlooper debuts “aggressive” new efforts to battle homelessness with marijuana tax dollars”. Denver Post. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  25. ^ Alvarez, Alayna (January 29, 2020). “Denver’s never-ending road home”. Colorado Politics. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  26. ^ a b de Yoanna, Michael (June 24, 2015). “What’s Next After Denver’s 10-Year Push To End Homelessness?”. Colorado Public Radio. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  27. ^ Garcia, Nic (March 5, 2019). “5 things to know about where John Hickenlooper stands on education”. Colorado Politics.
  28. ^ Merritt, George (May 1, 2007). “Hickenlooper coasts to second term”. The Denver Post. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  29. ^ “DNC host’s tax-free gas evaporates”. The Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on July 23, 2008.
  30. ^ Osher, Christopher N. “No more city gas for DNC host cars”. The Denver Post. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  31. ^ “Molson Coors will fuel DNC vehicles with ethanol from waste beer – Denver Business Journal”. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  32. ^ “Hickenlooper endorses Ritter for Gov”. The Rocky Mountain News. October 19, 2006. Archived from the original on September 15, 2008. Retrieved September 16, 2020.
  33. ^ Knox, Don (January 6, 2010). “Can You Say Gov. Hickenlooper?”. State Bill Colorado.
  34. ^ “Colorado Governor Bill Ritter not running for re-election”. 9 News. January 6, 2010.
  35. ^ “Salazar will not enter governor’s race”. The Denver Post. January 7, 2010.
  36. ^ Roberts, Michael (January 12, 2010). “John Hickenlooper to run for governor, multiple reports say”. Westword.
  37. ^ Bartels, Lynn; Crummy, Karen E. (August 6, 2010). “CSU-Pueblo chief tapped as Hickenlooper’s running mate”. The Denver Post.
  38. ^ “2010 Election Results”. The New York Times. November 2010. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  39. ^ Frank, John (November 5, 2014). “Re-elected Gov. Hickenlooper: “The voters of Colorado have spoken. The Denver Post.
  40. ^ a b Taylor, Jessica (March 4, 2019). “Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper Joins The 2020 Democratic Presidential Fray”. NPR. Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  41. ^ “Shumlin elected to lead DGA, with O’Comartun as top aide”. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  42. ^ Preston, Mark (August 25, 2017). “Source: Kasich, Hickenlooper consider unity presidential ticket in 2020”. CNN.
  43. ^ “Governor of Colorado”. Ballotpedia.
  44. ^ Oldham, Jennifer. “Hickenlooper violated Colorado gifts rules twice in 2018, state ethics panel says”. Washington Post. Retrieved August 24, 2020.
  45. ^ a b “Ethics commission fines Hickenlooper $2,750 for ethics violations, Colorado taxpayers pay $127,000 in attorney fees”. KUSA.com. Retrieved August 24, 2020.
  46. ^ Ochsner, Evan (June 12, 2020). “Colorado ethics panel orders John Hickenlooper to pay $2,750 for two violations”. The Colorado Sun. Retrieved August 24, 2020.
  47. ^ Swanson, Conrard (June 12, 2020). “John Hickenlooper fined $2,750 for ethics violations as Colorado governor”. The Denver Post. Retrieved August 24, 2020.
  48. ^ “Next senator? Hickenlooper”. The Denver Post. December 21, 2008. Retrieved December 21, 2008.
  49. ^ Osher, Christopher (December 24, 2008). “Denver mayor confirms interest in Senate job”. The Denver Post. Retrieved December 24, 2008.
  50. ^ Parnes, Amie (January 3, 2009). “Bennet pick shocks some in Colorado”. The Denver Post. Retrieved January 3, 2009.
  51. ^ Hickenlooper, John (August 22, 2019). “Not Done Fighting”. YouTube. John Hickenlooper. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  52. ^ “John Hickenlooper expected to end his 2020 campaign, may shift to Senate run”. MSNBC.com. August 15, 2019.
  53. ^ Wingerter, Justin. “Hickenlooper would have a massive lead in Senate primary, poll finds”. The Denver Post. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  54. ^ “Six women seeking Colorado Senate seat ask DSCC to reconsider endorsement of Hickenlooper”. The Washington Post. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  55. ^ “Live: Colorado State Primary Election Results 2020”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  56. ^ “Hickenlooper Wins The Dem Senate Primary; Will Face Cory Gardner”. CPR News. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  57. ^ Alas, Horus (November 3, 2020). “Democrat John Hickenlooper Defeats Cory Gardner for Colorado Senate Seat”. U.S. News.
  58. ^ Zelinger, Marshall (January 7, 2021). “Colorado Congressional Democrats advocate for removing Trump from office”. KUSA. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  59. ^ Nicholas Riccardi; James Anderson (December 5, 2018). “Colorado’s Hickenlooper staffs up for possible 2020 bid”. Associated Press. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  60. ^ “Form 3P for Hickenlooper 2020”. Campaign finance data. Federal Election Commission. December 23, 2019.
  61. ^ Golshan, Tara (March 4, 2019). “John Hickenlooper, former Colorado governor and brewpub owner, is running for president”. Vox. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  62. ^ Julie Turkewitz (March 4, 2019). “John Hickenlooper, Former Colorado Governor, Declares Candidacy for President”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  63. ^ a b Kyle Balluck; Michael Burke (March 4, 2019). “Hickenlooper launches 2020 presidential campaign”. The Hill. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  64. ^ Michael, Casey (February 14, 2019). “Ex-Colorado Gov. Hickenlooper tells New Hampshire crowd he supports universal health care”. The Denver Post. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  65. ^ Nicholas Riccardi; James Anderson (December 5, 2018). “Colorado’s Hickenlooper staffs up for possible 2020 bid”. Associated Press. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  66. ^ Joe St. George (March 1, 2019). “Hickenlooper expected to announce Presidential run next week”. FOX31 Denver. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  67. ^ Arke, Raymond (March 4, 2019). “How will moderate John Hickenlooper’s fundraising compare to bigger names?”. opensecrets.org. OpenSecrets.org. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  68. ^ Stevens, Matt; Flegenheimer, Matt (August 15, 2019). “John Hickenlooper to End Struggling Presidential Campaign”. The New York Times. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  69. ^ John Hickenlooper (August 15, 2019). Thank You on YouTube.
  70. ^ Paul, Jesse (August 15, 2019). “Hickenlooper formally ends his presidential bid, saying he intends to give U.S. Senate bid “serious thought. The Colorado Sun. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  71. ^ a b Roberts, Michael (May 22, 2013). “John Hickenlooper gives Nathan Dunlap reprieve from death but doesn’t grant clemency”. Westword.
  72. ^ Harrison, Wayne (May 10, 2013). “Letters urge governor to deny clemency for Nathan Dunlap”. 7 News Denver. Archived from the original on June 8, 2013.
  73. ^ “Gov. Hickenlooper grants temporary reprieve of death sentence”. colorado.gov. May 22, 2013. Archived from the original on April 14, 2014. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  74. ^ Potter, Maximilian; Hickenlooper, John (2016). The Opposite of Woe: My Life in Beer and Politics. p. 321. ISBN 9781101981689.
  75. ^ “Colorado Residents Welcome Disaster Relief Legislation”. CBS Denver. Associated Press. May 19, 2014. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  76. ^ O’Driscoll, Patrick (November 3, 2005). “Denver OKs pot”. USA Today. Retrieved May 6, 2010.
  77. ^ Hadar, Roey (March 4, 2019). “Gov. John Hickenlooper: 7 things you need to know about the 2020 Democrat”. Washington Week. PBS. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  78. ^ Cirilli, Kevin (January 23, 2015). “Governor: Legalizing pot was bad idea”. The Hill.
  79. ^ Kelly, David (May 17, 2016). “Governor who called legalization ‘reckless’ now says Colorado’s pot industry is working”. Los Angeles Times.
  80. ^ “Q&A: John Hickenlooper on Colorado’s marijuana legalization and how he talks to his son about pot”. The Denver Post. April 20, 2019.
  81. ^ a b Jaeger, Kyle (March 20, 2019). “Let States Decriminalize Heroin And Cocaine, Presidential Candidate Hickenlooper Says”. Marijuana Moment. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  82. ^ “Hickenlooper signs rural economic development bill”. March 11, 2014. Retrieved July 16, 2016.
  83. ^ Armbrister, Mollie (February 17, 2016). “Online job-hunting service for workers without degrees launches in Colorado”. Denver Business Journal. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  84. ^ Hendee, Caitlin (October 26, 2017). “Hickenlooper launches program for Colorado career coaches”. Denver Business Journal. Retrieved March 2, 2019.
  85. ^ Paige Ogburn, Stephanie (February 25, 2014). “Colorado First State to Limit Methane Pollution from Oil and Gas Wells”. Scientific American. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  86. ^ Williams, David (February 3, 2017). “Congress looks to gut federal methane rule modeled after Colorado regulations”. Real Vail. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  87. ^ McMahon, Xandra (July 11, 2017). “Colorado Joins States Upholding Paris Climate Accord”. Colorado Public Radio. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  88. ^ Patton, Zach (August 2014). “John Hickenlooper: The Man in the Middle”. www.governing.com. Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  89. ^ “I drank fracking fluid, says Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper”. The Washington Times. Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  90. ^ “U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 117th Congress – 1st Session”. www.senate.gov.
  91. ^ a b Bartells, Lynn; Lee, Kurtis (March 21, 2013). “3 new gun bills on the books in Colorado despite its Wild West image”. The Denver Post. pp. 1a, 10a.
  92. ^ Kertscher, Tom (May 30, 2019). “Fact-checking presidential hopeful John Hickenlooper on beating NRA with ‘tough’ Colorado gun laws”. PolitiFact.
  93. ^ Bartels, Lynn; Lee, Kurtis (November 17, 2013). “Evie Hudak resigns: Colorado state senator avoids recall election”. Denver Post.
  94. ^ “Guns: Concealed controversy”. The Denver Post. May 2, 2008.
  95. ^ Frank, John (April 30, 2018). “New Colorado “red flag” bill would allow gun seizure for six months or more from those who pose “significant risk. The Denver Post. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  96. ^ Miller, Blair (May 7, 2018). “Colorado’s ‘red flag’ bill dies in committee after 3-2 vote along party lines”. Denver Channel 7. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  97. ^ Rennie, Julianna (April 11, 2019). “Hickenlooper expanded Medicaid, created state-run marketplace to insure nearly all Coloradans”. PolitiFact.
  98. ^ Novello, Gabriella. “FACT CHECK: Gardner and Hickenlooper on Immigration”. Colorado Times Recorder. Retrieved February 5, 2021.
  99. ^ “John Hickenlooper on Immigration”. ontheissues.org. On the Issues. Retrieved February 5, 2021.
  100. ^ “U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 117th Congress – 1st Session”. senate.gov. Retrieved February 5, 2021.
  101. ^ “Sen. John Hickenlooper frustrates immigration activists with vote to block some from stimulus checks”. The Denver Post. February 4, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2021.
  102. ^ Burke, Michael (March 11, 2019). “2020 Dem candidate Hickenlooper advocates exploring legalized prostitution”. TheHill. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  103. ^ “Gov. John Hickenlooper marries Robin Pringle in small ceremony”. The Denver Post. January 16, 2016.
  104. ^ Gathright, Alan (August 4, 2006). “Hickenloopers out to forsake their LoDo loft”. Rocky Mountain News. Denver Publishing Company. pp. 6A. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  105. ^ “Governors-including Hickenlooper-forgoing living in executive mansions”. Denver Post. Archived from the original on April 16, 2012.
  106. ^ Bartels, Lynn (July 31, 2012). “Colorado governor and wife to separate, political future still looks bright”. The Denver Post. Retrieved August 5, 2012.
  107. ^ Bunch, Joey (November 18, 2019). “BEST OF COPO 2018 | Hickenlooper looks back, ahead”. Colorado Politics. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  108. ^ Woodard, Colin (March 17, 2019). “Presidential candidate John Hickenlooper got his start volunteering in Maine”. Portland Press Herald. Portland, ME. Retrieved April 25, 2019.
  109. ^ Timpane, John (October 27, 2010). “On campaign trail with John Hickenlooper, Pennsylvania native running for Colorado governor”. Inquirer. Retrieved August 10, 2011.
  110. ^ “The Honorable John W. Hickenlooper: Top Takeaways” (PDF). Recently at ECC. Economic Club of Chicago. November 14, 2018.
  111. ^ Nordyke, Kimberly (November 22, 2010). “George Hickenlooper’s Death Caused by Accidental Overdose”. The Hollywood Reporter.
  112. ^ Ealy, Charles. “George Hickenlooper: The life and times of a director”. Austin American-Statesman. Archived from the original on November 8, 2010. Retrieved August 10, 2011.
  113. ^ Kenney, Andrew (December 6, 2018). “The Spot: Denver politics are about to take center stage and what’s coming in 2019 for marijuana”. The Denver Post. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  114. ^ a b Rossman, Sean (March 21, 2019). “Presidential candidate John Hickenlooper said he watched ‘Deep Throat’ with his mom”. USA TODAY. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  115. ^ Zug, James (May 24, 2017). “National Doubles Goes a Mile High”. Squash Magazine. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  116. ^ Merica, Dan (June 26, 2019). “John Hickenlooper didn’t mean to forget who you are: How face blindness has affected his political career”. CNN.
  117. ^ Frank, John; Paul, Jesse (December 20, 2019). “John Hickenlooper is worth at least $7.8 million. Here is where his money is invested”. The Colorado Sun. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  118. ^ Wingerter, Justin (December 20, 2019). “John Hickenlooper files financial disclosure form showing net worth is at least $9M”. The Denver Post. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  119. ^ “Colorado Sen. John Hickenlooper tests positive for COVID-19”. The Denver Post. August 19, 2021. Retrieved August 19, 2021.
  120. ^ Garcia, Catherine (August 20, 2021). “John Hickenlooper becomes 3rd senator to test positive for COVID-19 on Thursday”. Yahoo! News. Retrieved August 21, 2021.
  121. ^ Farrell, Susan (2008). Critical companion to Kurt Vonnegut: a literary reference to his life and work. Infobase. p. 284. ISBN 978-0-8160-6598-1.
  122. ^ Is Denver Mayor Hickenlooper Kurt Vonnegut’s Long-Lost Son (YouTube video).
  123. ^ Sanchez, Robert (November 16, 2012). “John Hickenlooper Interview 1212”. Esquire Magazine. Retrieved December 16, 2012.
  124. ^ Kaji, Mina; Szabo, Christine; Gehlen, Bobby (August 25, 2019). “John Hickenlooper: Everything you need to know about the former 2020 presidential candidate”. ABC News. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  125. ^ Baumgarten, Marjorie (January 5, 2011). “Hickenlooper Lobbies for ‘Casino Jack. Austin Chronicle. Retrieved April 16, 2021.

Further reading

  • Hickenlooper, John; Potter, Maximillian (2016). The Opposite of Woe: My Life in Beer and Politics. New York: Penguin Press. ISBN 9781101981672. OCLC 929055877.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by

Mayor of Denver
2003–2011
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Governor of Colorado
2011–2019
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Chair of the National Governors Association
2014–2015
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

Democratic nominee for Governor of Colorado
2010, 2014
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Colorado
(Class 2)

2020
Most recent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by

U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Colorado
2021–present
Served alongside: Michael Bennet
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States senators by seniority
95th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Other

He’s a centrist, business-oriented governor who led the way on gun control and split from his party base on some environmental issues.  Aug. 15, 2019

Capital Punishment / Death Penalty

Abolish it

Income Inequality

Expand tax benefits for middle-class and low-income Americans

Minimum Wage

Raise the federal minimum wage to $15/hour

Paid Leave

Support broad paid family and medical leave plans up to 12 weeks

Reparations

Study reparations

Cost of College

Two years should be free

Student Debt

Expand or fix existing debt-relief programs

see link above for positions on issues

X
Cory GardnerCory Gardner

Current Position: US Senator since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator

He began serving in the Colorado House of Representatives in 2005 where he spent time as the Minority Whip and became known for his expertise in natural resource and agriculture policy. Cory was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010.

As a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Cory championed a true all-of-the-above energy strategy that promoted traditional resources as well as renewable energy. In addition, Cory is a national leader on energy efficiency initiatives and founded a bipartisan energy efficiency caucus in the House.

Source: Government page

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator

He began serving in the Colorado House of Representatives in 2005 where he spent time as the Minority Whip and became known for his expertise in natural resource and agriculture policy. Cory was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010.

As a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Cory championed a true all-of-the-above energy strategy that promoted traditional resources as well as renewable energy. In addition, Cory is a national leader on energy efficiency initiatives and founded a bipartisan energy efficiency caucus in the House.

Source: Government page

Twitter

About

Source: Government page

Senator Cory Gardner is a fifth-generation Coloradan who was born and raised in Yuma, a small town on the Eastern Plains of Colorado where his family has owned a farm implement dealership for over a century. He lives in the same house his great-grandparents lived in. Cory graduated summa cum laude from Colorado State University and received his law degree from the University of Colorado Boulder. After working at his family implement business and the National Corn Growers Association, Cory took a position as a Legislative Assistant for Senator Wayne Allard (R-CO) and quickly advanced to his Legislative Director.

He began serving in the Colorado House of Representatives in 2005 where he spent time as the Minority Whip and became known for his expertise in natural resource and agriculture policy. Cory was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. As a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Cory championed a true all-of-the-above energy strategy that promoted traditional resources as well as renewable energy. In addition, Cory is a national leader on energy efficiency initiatives and founded a bipartisan energy efficiency caucus in the House.

Experience

Education

  • Bachelor
    Colorado State University
  • J.D.
    University of Colorado, Boulder

Offices

Denver
1961 Stout Street, Suite #12-300
Denver, CO 80294
Phone: (303) 391-5777

Colorado Springs
102 S. Tejon Street, Suite 930
Colorado Springs, CO 80903
Phone: (719) 632-6706

Pueblo
503 N. Main Street, Suite 426
Pueblo, CO 81003
Phone: Phone: (719) 543-1324

Grand Junction
400 Rood Avenue, Federal Bldg., Suite 220
Grand Junction, CO 81501
Phone: (970) 245-9553

Greeley
801 8th Street, Suite 140A
Greeley, CO 80631
Phone: (970) 352-5546

Web

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Government Page

Politics

Recent Elections

2014 US Senator

Cory Gardner (R)983,89148.2%
Mark Udall (D)944,20346.3%
TOTAL1,928,094

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

GARDNER, CORY has run in 6 races for public office, winning 5 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $28,628,633.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Committee on Foreign Relations
   The United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. It is charged with leading foreign-policy legislation and debate in the Senate. The Foreign Relations Committee is generally responsible for overseeing (but not administering) and funding foreign aid programs as well as funding arms sales and training for national allies. The committee is also responsible for holding confirmation hearings for high-level positions in the Department of State.
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
   The United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has jurisdiction over matters related to energy and nuclear waste policy, territorial policy, native Hawaiian matters, and public lands.
Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation
   The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation has jurisdiction over matters relating to the Coast Guard, coastal zone management, communications, highway safety, inland waterways, interstate commerce, marine and ocean navigation, safety, and transportation, nonmilitary aeronautical and space sciences , oceans, weather, and atmospheric …

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Economy

Jobs and the Economy

Our economy recovered slowly from the severe recession in 2008, but it has begun to turn a corner. Americans are returning to work, corporate earnings are high, and the stock market has risen to record levels. However, these gains mask the fact that middle class Coloradans and Americans are still struggling to make ends meet. With labor force participation still unnervingly low and workers’ hourly earnings just beginning to show signs of growth, we still have a long way to go until the middle class feels like the recovery is real.

I’ve called this our “veneered economy”, and you don’t have to scratch too far below the surface to see American families hurting. The urban-rural divide in this country is a heartbreaking example of unbalanced economic growth that has changed the small towns and main streets that once served as vital community hubs. More must be done to ensure that all Americans benefit from our country’s economic prosperity.

Education

Education

I strongly believe quality in education stems from the state rather than the federal government, because local school boards, communities, and parents best understand the needs of their students and are therefore better equipped to make decisions that will lead to excellence in education. I support reducing the federal role in education and returning authority to where it belongs: state and local community’s authority.  Coloradans know best what their students need and Washington bureaucrats do not need to interfere.

It’s absolutely critical, therefore, that we get Congress out of the classroom.

Environment

Energy and the Environment

The United States is entering a new phase of energy history, and the nation is at the cusp of energy independence as we continue to produce our own secure supply of energy. Meeting our country’s energy demands will include an all-of-the-above strategy. Policies that allow us to fully unleash our energy potential in this country, in a safe and responsible manner, lead to greater economic opportunity.

 

In Colorado, we are blessed with abundant and diverse natural resources, and the state is on the cutting edge of energy production and research, due in large part to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) located in Golden, Colorado. I support developing and utilizing American energy of all kinds. This includes the use of traditional power like coal, oil, nuclear, natural gas, along with the use of renewable energy such as wind, solar, hydroelectric power, and geothermal. Keeping our nation at the forefront of energy research and development must be a goal of any federal energy policy.

Health Care

Health Care

t is my belief that all Americans deserve access to quality and affordable health care, and I am committed to supporting common sense solutions that expand coverage and contain costs. According to an independent study, the United States has the most expensive health care system in the world, and due to the so-called “Affordable Care Act” the situation continues to worsen and costs continue to soar. In 2015, more than 126,000 Coloradans had to pay a fine for not complying with Obamacare’s individual mandate. Congress was able to repeal Obamacare’s individual mandate that forced people to buy insurance they could not afford but more needs to be done. Fixing our healthcare system will require repealing the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with patient-centered solutions, which empower Americans and their doctors.

Infrastructure

Transportation and Infrastructure

Transportation infrastructure is critical to Colorado’s economy, whether it’s commuting in and around Denver, the thousand-plus daily flights through Denver International Airport, or the millions of pounds of freight passing through on our highways.

With Colorado’s population growing at one of the fastest rates in the country, it is critical that we are making necessary investments in our state’s infrastructure to keep up with this growth. Some of our existing highways date back to the 1960s and were not designed to handle the millions who have moved into Colorado over the past several decades. In order to remain economically competitive, Coloradans must be able to seamlessly travel and commute throughout the state.

Just like I believe in an all-of-the-above strategy on energy, I believe we need an all-of-the-above strategy on transportation. This includes the traditional modes of travel on our roads and highways combined with new modes like bus-rapid-transit and rail.

In the Senate, I am proud to be the first Colorado Senator in forty years to sit on the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. As part of my responsibilities, I sit on the Subcommittee on Aviation and Space. With Colorado touting one of the largest airports in the world combined with countless more commercial and general aviation airports, I am fighting to ensure our airports have the resources they need to be competitive in a global economy.

Safety

National Security and Foreign Policy

he United States must have an assertive and principled foreign policy to rise to the challenge of the growing threats of international terrorism, nuclear proliferation, and authoritarian regimes that threaten global peace and security.

 

While we are focused on the ongoing crises in the Middle East and in Europe, we must also look to strengthen our existing alliances and build new partnerships in the Asia-Pacific region. This region is home to the world’s most dynamically-growing economies, but also the challenges and opportunities presented by a rising China and the existential threat of a belligerent North Korea. We must pursue policies to ensure the United States remains the leading force in that strategically-important region.

 

I authored the North Korea Sanctions Policy and Enhancement Act. Signed into law by President Obama in February of 2016, the legislation marked the first time Congress imposed stand-alone mandatory sanctions on North Korea. I have called for additional steps –including my bipartisan legislation that would ban any entity that does business with North Korea or its enablers from using the United States financial system.

 

Our Constitution obligates us to “provide for the common defense”.  As home to Fort Carson, Peterson, Schriever, and Buckley Air Force bases, Cheyenne Mountain Air Station, and the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado is at the forefront of our military’s mission to protect our nation and to train our nation’s young leaders.  We must consistently and responsibly invest in our military to ensure the safety and security of Americans and our friends and allies around the world.

Veterans

Military and Veterans

The United States military is the most powerful force for good in the world, and troops and facilities in Colorado are a big reason why. All of Colorado’s military installations, including Fort Carson, the Air Force Academy, and Buckley, Peterson, and Schriever Air Force Bases, are on the cutting edge of military readiness and protecting our national security.

I will always fight to protect and grow the presence of the United States military in Colorado and will work to ensure that these bases, which are essential to both national security and Colorado communities, remain strong.

We must also ensure that our commitment to our men and women in uniform goes beyond active service. Colorado is home to over 400,000 veterans, and there is no more important mission of our federal government than to provide for those who served our country in uniform.  We must uphold our commitments to our veterans and ensure they are receiving the care they need and deserve. Additionally, I will continue to hold federal agencies accountable for waste and abuse of resources devoted to veterans.

Public Lands, Sportsmen, and the Outdoors

Public lands are some of our most cherished national treasures, and as a fifth generation Coloradan I understand the importance of preserving iconic landscapes in my state and across the nation. Public lands in Colorado help create an outdoor recreation economy that contributes hundreds of millions of dollars in economic activity to the state and local communities, and supports jobs.

 

Many conservation programs, like the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), have created protections for lands that current and future generations will be able to enjoy. The LWCF and other programs are often critical tools in expanding access to our public lands. Keeping these lands open for all to enjoy activities such as hunting, fishing, camping, hiking and other recreational opportunities is something I support.

 

We must be good stewards of our natural environment, and this includes being responsible for the lands placed into parks, historic sites and trails, monuments, and recreation areas. The wildlife and wilderness that can be seen within these areas is something that cannot be taught in our classrooms. We need to work together to help preserve and promote these sites for the millions of visitors each year.

Space, Science, and Research

Colorado’s role in science and space is recognized globally, from the ORION program which aims to take humans to Mars, to NORAD and its famous Santa Claus tracker. Our state is a leader in this field and I am committed to expanding these efforts.

Colorado has positioned itself as a hub of space exploration. We have the third largest aerospace sector and are first per capita in the country for private aerospace employees. Colorado companies are out front, conducting research and creating the infrastructure to get humans to Mars and beyond.

Second Amendment

I am proud to support and protect an individual’s right to keep and bear arms. Colonial-era state charters recognized this vital protection well before the framers enshrined it in the Second Amendment of our Constitution, and the right is just as fundamental to our American identity today as it was centuries ago.

Despite a long, rich tradition, the Second Amendment has been repeatedly attacked and undermined. These misguided campaigns against a fundamental American right only seek to limit the freedoms of law-abiding citizens. Americans must have the ability to determine the best way to protect and defend themselves. It is vital that Congress follow the principles of personal liberty that guided our founding fathers and protect the Second Amendment from needless government overreach. This individual right must not be eroded in any capacity.

For centuries, Americans have exercised their Second Amendment rights responsibly, and I’m committed to pursuing policies that encourage such responsible firearm usage. By focusing on mental health services and stopping dangerous individuals from obtaining firearms, we can prevent heinous, criminal acts from occurring. We must also continue to emphasize the importance of firearm training and safety, ideals often passed down from generation to generation of responsible gun owners. By exercising Second Amendment rights responsibly, we honor this centuries-old tradition that has served as a bedrock of American society.

X
Skip to toolbar