Diana DeGetteDiana DeGette – CO1

Current Position: US Representative for CO-01 since 1997
Affiliation: Democrat

Other positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigation – Committee on Energy and Commerce

Quote:
We have just reintroduced our bill to ban high-capacity gun magazines. There’s no reason why any civilian needs a gun magazine that holds more than 10 rounds. This legislation will save lives and Congress needs to act immediately. April 14, 2021

Video:
Rep. Diana DeGette argues that Trump’s words led supporters to Capitol on Jan. 6
Feb. 11, 2011

 

Colorado Congresswoman Diana DeGette is teaming up with other members of Congress to pass the Women’s Health Protection act. This would guarantee the right of all Americans to access abortion care regardless of where they live.

This comes after Texas passed a strict abortion ban. The Texas law, allowed to stand in a decision Thursday by the U.S. Supreme Court, bans abortions once medical professionals can detect cardiac activity, typically around six weeks. In a highly unusual twist, enforcement will be done by private citizens who can sue anyone they believe is violating the law.

A Colorado clinic that already had started seeing more patients from other states was preparing to ramp up supplies and staffing in anticipation of the law taking effect.

The number of Texans seeking abortions in Planned Parenthood clinics in the Rocky Mountain region, which covers Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming and southern Nevada, was 12 times higher that month. In California, 7,000 patients came from other states to Planned Parenthood clinics in 2020.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for CO-01 since 1997
Affiliation: Democrat

Other positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigation – Committee on Energy and Commerce

Quote:
We have just reintroduced our bill to ban high-capacity gun magazines. There’s no reason why any civilian needs a gun magazine that holds more than 10 rounds. This legislation will save lives and Congress needs to act immediately. April 14, 2021

Video:
Rep. Diana DeGette argues that Trump’s words led supporters to Capitol on Jan. 6
Feb. 11, 2011

 

News

Colorado Congresswoman Diana DeGette is teaming up with other members of Congress to pass the Women’s Health Protection act. This would guarantee the right of all Americans to access abortion care regardless of where they live.

This comes after Texas passed a strict abortion ban. The Texas law, allowed to stand in a decision Thursday by the U.S. Supreme Court, bans abortions once medical professionals can detect cardiac activity, typically around six weeks. In a highly unusual twist, enforcement will be done by private citizens who can sue anyone they believe is violating the law.

A Colorado clinic that already had started seeing more patients from other states was preparing to ramp up supplies and staffing in anticipation of the law taking effect.

The number of Texans seeking abortions in Planned Parenthood clinics in the Rocky Mountain region, which covers Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming and southern Nevada, was 12 times higher that month. In California, 7,000 patients came from other states to Planned Parenthood clinics in 2020.

Twitter

About

Diana DeGette 1

Source: Government page

Rep. Diana DeGette is a fourth-generation Coloradoan who has dedicated her life to serving the people of Colorado’s First Congressional District.

Now in her thirteenth term, DeGette is recognized as a leading voice in the nation’s ongoing health care debate. As the chair of a key oversight panel, DeGette is responsible for overseeing some of our nation’s most important federal agencies – including the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In her role as chair of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, DeGette has become a leading figure in overseeing our nation’s health agencies as they respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, ensuring the EPA is properly enforcing the nation’s environmental laws, and lowering the cost of insulin for the millions of Americans who rely on it every day.

In addition to chairing the Energy and Commerce Oversight panel, DeGette also serves as a member of the House Natural Resources Committee, where she’s working to enact policies that will further protect Colorado’s public lands and combat climate change.

A leader on health care…

Rep. DeGette believes Congress has a responsibility to make health care more accessible and affordable for all Americans. Among her Congressional colleagues, DeGette is seen as a leading expert on cutting-edge scientific research, including the use of human embryonic stem cells.

In 2005, DeGette authored the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act to overturn the restrictions President George W. Bush put in place to prohibit the use of embryonic stem cells for research purposes. While Congress voted twice to approve DeGette’s legislation, President Bush vetoed it both times. In March 2009, President Obama included the language from DeGette’s bill in an executive order he signed to reverse the restrictions.

In addition to expanding the use of stem cell research, DeGette has been instrumental in expanding the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), which provides health insurance to low-income children. She also played a key role in drafting the Affordable Care Act, which President Obama signed into law in 2010.

Despite her many accomplishments, the one piece of legislation DeGette is best known for championing is the 21st Century Cures Act, which has modernized the nation’s medical research system. The bill, known simply as the Cures Act, has been widely hailed as one of the most important pieces of legislation that Congress has passed in recent years. From cancer research to precision medicine, it has enabled more labs to make more breakthrough discoveries that could soon lead to new cures and treatments for patients around the world.

Fighting to protect women’s rights and health care…

As co-chair of the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus, DeGette has been an outspoken leader in the fight to protect women’s right to reproductive care.

In 2021, she co-authored the EACH Act, to overturn turn a federal law known as  the Hyde Amendment, which prevents federal insurance programs – such as Medicaid or Tricare – from paying for abortion services.

DeGette is also the lead sponsor of the Prevention First agenda, which seeks to increase access to birth control and other family-planning services aimed at preventing unintended pregnancies from occurring in the first place.

She’s also a leading advocate for the Equal Pay Act to help close the gender pay gap and ensure women receive equal pay for equal work.

Fighting to protect the environment…

A lifelong Coloradan, DeGette is guided by her traditional Western values and has a unique appreciation for our nation’s natural resources and public lands. In 2019, DeGette sponsored legislation that was signed into law to make all national parks and public lands free for fourth grade students and their families to visit. She also authored a historic piece of legislation, known as the Colorado Wilderness Act, to protect and preserve 660,000 acres of wilderness across Colorado.

As a member of the House Natural Resources Committee, DeGette is focused on enacting new policies aimed at combating the climate crisis, while helping to grow our country’s clean energy economy.

In 2007, DeGette successfully brokered a deal to enact tough new standards to protect Americans from lead in drinking water. She also played a key role in the effort to ban phthalates, a dangerous chemical which is harmful to children. And, as chair of the subcommittee that’s responsible for overseeing the FDA, DeGette is leading the charge to protect our nation’s food supply.

Fighting to protect civil rights…

DeGette’s passion for protecting people’s rights is what led her to pursue public office. Prior to being elected to Congress, DeGette was an attorney in the Denver area where she focused on workers’ rights. While in office, DeGette has worked tirelessly to protect the rights of women, immigrants and minorities in Colorado and across the country.

In 2019, DeGette convened the first House oversight hearing on the Trump administration’s controversial policy of separating families at the border and continues to fight for the better treatment of immigrants and their families.

In recognition of her outstanding commitment to protecting civil rights, the ACLU of Colorado awarded DeGette with its Carle Whitehead Memorial Award, which is given to those who make extraordinary contributions to protecting civil rights and furthering civil liberties in Colorado. DeGette is also the recipient of the NEWSED Community Development Corporation’s Civil Rights Award for her work to protect the rights of her fellow Coloradans.

A champion of bipartisanship…

Even in times of intense political division, DeGette has shown an ability to reach across the aisle to get results for the people of her district.

In 2017, DeGette was honored by the Javits Foundation for her renowned commitment to cooperation and collaboration across party lines.

In 2018, the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress awarded DeGette with its Statesmanship award for her efforts to pass legislation in a collaborative and bipartisan manner.

A lifelong Denverite…

A fourth generation Coloradan and a lifelong Denverite, DeGette is a graduate of Denver’s South High School. She earned her B.A, magna cum laude, from Colorado College in 1979; and a J.D. from New York University School of Law in 1982.

Before serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, DeGette served two terms in the Colorado House, including one term as Assistant Minority Leader from 1993-1995.

In 1996, after two terms in the state legislature, DeGette was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives where she continues to serve the people of Colorado’s 1st Congressional District.

DeGette is married to Lino Lipinsky. They have two daughters and a son-in-law.

Committees 

Committee on Energy and Commerce

  • Chair, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigation
  • Subcommittee on the Environment and Climate Change
  • Subcommittee on Energy

Committee on Natural Resources

  • Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands
  • Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

Caucuses  

  • Congressional Diabetes Caucus which supports legislative activities that would improve diabetes research, education and treatment.
  • Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus which works to protect Americans’ constitutionally protected reproductive rights.
  • Congressional Privacy Caucus which works to protect the privacy of Americans’ personal consumer information.

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

Experience

Education

Contact

Email:

Offices

Denver District Office
600 Grant Street, Suite 202
Denver, CO 80203
Phone: (303) 844-4988
Fax: (303) 844-4996

Washington, DC Office
2111 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-4431
Fax: (202) 225-5657

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Diana Louise DeGette (/dɪˈɡɛt/; born July 29, 1957) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Colorado’s 1st congressional district since 1997. A member of the Democratic Party, her district is based in Denver. DeGette was a Chief Deputy Whip from 2005 to 2019 and is the dean of Colorado’s congressional delegation; she served as the Colorado State Representative for the 6th district from 1993 until her election to the U.S. House.

Early life, education and career

A fourth-generation Coloradan, DeGette was born in Tachikawa, Japan, the daughter of Patricia Anne (née Rose) and Richard Louis DeGette.[3] Her parents were American, and at the time of her birth her father was serving in the armed forces. She graduated from Colorado College, where she earned a B.A. in political science and was elected to the Pi Gamma Mu international honor society in 1979.[4] She earned a Juris Doctor degree from New York University School of Law in 1982. She then returned to Denver and began a law practice focusing on civil rights and employment litigation.[5]

Colorado Legislature

Long active in Denver politics, DeGette was elected to the Colorado House of Representatives in 1992. She was reelected in 1994 and chosen as assistant minority leader. She authored a law that guarantees Colorado women unobstructed access to abortion clinics and other medical care facilities, also known as the Bubble Bill. The United States Supreme Court found the Bubble Bill constitutional in Hill v. Colorado, 530 U.S. 703 (2000). DeGette also authored the state Voluntary Cleanup and Redevelopment Act, a model for similar cleanup programs.[citation needed]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

1996

Longtime 1st district Representative Pat Schroeder chose not to run for a 13th term in 1996, prompting DeGette to run. Her principal opponent in the primary election was former City Council member Tim Sandos, whom Denver Mayor Wellington Webb endorsed shortly before the primary. DeGette won the primary with 55% of the vote, all but assuring her of election in the heavily Democratic district (the 1st has been in Democratic hands for all but four years since 1933). Schroeder, who stayed neutral during the primary, endorsed DeGette once DeGette became the nominee. DeGette won with 57% of the vote and has been reelected 11 times since.

2006

DeGette defeated Green Party nominee Tom Kelly.

2008

DeGette defeated Republican nominee George Lilly, Libertarian nominee Martin Buchanan, and Independent Gary Swing.

2010

DeGette defeated Republican nominee Mike Fallon, Green nominee Gary Swing, American Constitutional Party nominee Chris Styskal, and Libertarian nominee Clint Jones.

2012

DeGette defeated Republican nominee Danny Stroud, Libertarian nominee Frank Atwood, and Green Party nominee Gary Swing. She won 68.23% of the vote.

2014

DeGette defeated Republican nominee Martin Walsh, Libertarian nominee Frank Atwood, UNA nominee Danny Stroud, and two write-in candidates. She won 65.81% of the vote.[6]

2016

DeGette defeated Republican nominee Charles “Casper” Stockham, and Libertarian nominee Darrell Dinges. She won 257,254 votes, 67.87% of the total.[7]

2018

DeGette defeated Republican nominee Charles Stockham and Libertarian nominee Raymon Doane. She won 272,886 votes, 73.8% of the total.

2020

DeGette defeated Republican nominee Shane Bolling, Libertarian nominee Kyle Furey, Unity nominee Paul Noel Fiorino, and Approval Voting nominee Jan Kok. DeGette won 331,621 votes, 73.6% of the total.

Tenure

DeGette serves as the co-chair of both the Congressional Diabetes Caucus and Pro-Choice Caucus, and she is Vice Chair of the LGBT Equality Caucus. With the Democrats’ victory in the 2006 midterm elections, DeGette briefly considered running for House Majority Whip, but bowed out in favor of Jim Clyburn of South Carolina.

DeGette sat as speaker pro tempore and presided over the debate on December 18, 2019, the day United States House of Representatives voted on the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

DeGette received national attention in 2005, when the House of Representatives passed legislation she cosponsored to lift President George W. Bush‘s limits on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. DeGette, who had been working on the measure since 2001, enlisted the support of Representative Michael N. Castle (Republican from Delaware), who became DeGette’s principal Republican cosponsor of the legislation. The DeGette-Castle bill passed the Senate on July 18, 2006. President Bush vetoed the bill the next day — his first veto.[citation needed]

In 2007, DeGette served as the House Democrats’ designated whip on the bill reauthorizing the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (HR 3162). Although President Bush announced his opposition to the legislation, the House passed the bill on August 1, 2007, by a vote of 225 to 204. The Senate adopted a different version of the legislation the next day.

DeGette was also a cosponsor for the Udall Amendment to the House Energy Bill, which the House approved by a vote of 220 to 190 on August 4, 2007. The Amendment creates a national Renewable Energy Standard that requires electric suppliers to produce 15 percent of their energy from renewable sources, 4 percent of which can come from efficiency, by the year 2020.[citation needed]

On September 12, 2007, DeGette announced that she would introduce the Colorado Wilderness Act of 2007 in Congress. The bill was unsuccessful and did not pass the committee level.[8] She reintroduced the bill in 2009.

DeGette is a cosponsor of legislation to provide the District of Columbia voting representation.[9]
On January 24, 2007, Speaker Nancy Pelosi appointed Representative DeGette to the House Page Board.

On November 26, 2007, DeGette announced her endorsement of Senator Hillary Clinton for president and was named national co-chair of Clinton’s Health Care Policy Task Force and adviser on stem-cell research.[10] DeGette was a superdelegate to the Democratic National Convention in Denver in August 2008.

DeGette was strongly critical of the Stupak-Pitts Amendment, which places limits on taxpayer-funded abortions (except in the case of rape, incest, or life of the mother) in the context of the November 2009 Affordable Health Care for America Act.

On January 12th 2021, Degette was named an impeachment manager for the second impeachment of President Trump. [11]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

  • Congressional Arts Caucus[12]
  • Arts Caucus
  • Pro-Choice Caucus (Co-Chair)
  • Privacy Caucus (Co-Chair)
  • Children’s Caucus
  • Congressional Brain Injury Caucus
  • Congressional Children’s Health Caucus
  • Congressional Cystic Fibrosis Caucus
  • Congressional Multiple Sclerosis Caucus
  • Diabetes Caucus (Co-Chair)
  • Down Syndrome Caucus
  • Food Safety Caucus
  • French Caucus
  • Internet Caucus
  • LGBT Equality Caucus (Vice-Chair)
  • National Landscape Conversation System (NLCS) Caucus
  • Natural Gas Caucus
  • Public Broadcasting Caucus
  • Recycling Caucus
  • Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucus
  • Women’s Caucus
  • Congressional Progressive Caucus[13]

Party leadership

Political positions

Abortion

Diana DeGette denouncing a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution to ban same-sex marriage, 2005

DeGette is pro-choice and the co-chair of the Pro-Choice Caucus. DeGette and her former fellow co-chair, Louise Slaughter, are the sponsors of the Prevention First Act.[14] This act aims to decrease the number of unintended pregnancies, abortions and sexually transmitted diseases through better women’s healthcare. The NARAL Pro-Choice America PAC endorsed DeGette and gave her a 100% approval rating based on her positions.[15][16] DeGette also received a 100% rating from Planned Parenthood.[16] The National Right to Life Committee gave her a 0% rating due to her strong pro-choice stance.[16]

Embryonic stem cell research

DeGette has consistently voted in favor of the use of embryonic stem cell research.[17] DeGette says “we must pass common-sense embryonic stem cell research legislation, placing these regulations into statute and once and for all, ensuring this critical life-saving research can be conducted for years to come, unimpeded by political whims or naysayers.”[18] DeGette and Charlie Dent introduced the bipartisan Stem Cell Research Act of 2011, which would provide lasting support for stem cell research.[19]

Gun control

DeGette supports bans on semi-automatic firearms like those used in the 2012 Aurora, Colorado shooting, which happened in a movie theater near her district. DeGette has stated that “the sole purpose of these guns and these magazines is to kill people.”[20] DeGette and Carolyn McCarthy introduced the Stop Online Ammunition Sales Act of 2012.[21] The Brady Campaign endorsed DeGette’s reelection in 2008, 2010, and 2012.

In 2013, DeGette drew national attention after making an erroneous statement at a public forum about firearm magazine restrictions.[22] She stated, “[t]hese are ammunition, they’re bullets, so the people who have those now, they’re going to shoot them, so if you ban them in the future, the number of these high-capacity magazines is going to decrease dramatically over time because the bullets will have been shot and there won’t be any more available.” (Id.) The comment, failing to take into account the fact that these magazines are designed to be reloaded, fueled long-running complaints by gun-rights groups that lawmakers trying to regulate firearms do not understand the issue. (Id.)

In June 2016, DeGette and other Democratic lawmakers, led by John Lewis (D-GA) took part in a sit-in on the floor of the House of Representatives to protest the Republican leadership’s decision to not put several proposed gun control bills up for a vote.[23]

Personal life

DeGette is married to attorney Lino Lipinsky. They live in Denver[24] and have two daughters together. DeGette sings in her church choir.[25]

Books

  • Diana DeGette, Sex, Science, and Stem Cells: Inside the Right Wing Assault on Reason, The Lyons Press (August 4, 2008), ISBN 978-1-59921-431-3

See also

References

  1. ^ “Our Campaigns – CO State House 06 Race – Nov 03, 1992”. www.ourcampaigns.com.
  2. ^ “Our Campaigns – CO State House 06 Race – Nov 08, 1994”. www.ourcampaigns.com.
  3. ^ “Degette”. Ancestry.com. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  4. ^ “Diana DeGette’s Biography”. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 23 December 2014.
  5. ^ “Diana DeGette”. Coloado Encyclopedia. 9 June 2020.
  6. ^ “Colorado Secretary of State”. Retrieved 2015-08-18.
  7. ^ “Colorado Secretary of State”. Retrieved 2017-07-19.
  8. ^ “H.R. 3756 [110th]: Colorado Wilderness Act of 2007”. GovTrack.us. Retrieved 2010-08-22.
  9. ^ H.R. 2043 (“To establish the District of Columbia as a Congressional district for purposes of representation in the House of Representatives, and for other purposes.”) Archived 2016-07-04 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ “Colorado Rep. Diana DeGette Endorses Clinton”. Archived from the original on 2008-03-18.
  11. ^ “Pelosi Names Impeachment Managers”. Speaker Nancy Pelosi. 2021-01-12. Retrieved 2021-01-13.
  12. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Arts Caucus. Archived from the original on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  13. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Retrieved 2021-03-29.
  14. ^ “Pro-Choice Caucus Co-Chairs U.S. Reps. Slaughter and DeGette Applaud Family Planning Funding in Obama’s Budget”. Degette.house.gov. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  15. ^ “Elections”. NARAL Pro-Choice America. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  16. ^ a b c “Diana DeGette – Ratings and Endorsements”. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  17. ^ “Representative Diana DeGette – Stem Cell Research Voting Records”. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  18. ^ “DeGette and Dent Introduce Stem Cell Legislation”. Degette.house.gov. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  19. ^ Lillis, Mike (2010-08-24). “DeGette calls for legislation overturning court’s stem cell ruling”. The Hill’s Healthwatch. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  20. ^ “Representative DeGette on Gun Control”. C-SPAN Video Library. 2012-08-02. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  21. ^ “DeGette and McCarthy Introduce Legislation to Effectively Ban Online Ammo Sales”. Degette.house.gov. Retrieved 2013-06-19.
  22. ^ “Representative DeGette on High-Capacity Magazines”. Denver Post. 2013-04-03. Retrieved 2017-04-27.
  23. ^ “Colorado Democrats Taking Part in House Sit-In”. Denverite. 2016-06-22. Retrieved 2017-06-12.
  24. ^ Helfrich, Jesse (25 October 2013). “DeGette”. The Hill.
  25. ^ “Diana Degette bio”. The Denver Post. 28 October 2006.

External links

Colorado House of Representatives
Preceded by

Jerry Kopel
Member of the Colorado House of Representatives
from the 6th district

1993-1997
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Colorado’s 1st congressional district

1997–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
36th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Diana DeGette (D)272,88673.8%
Casper Stockham (R)85,20723.0%
TOTAL358,093

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

DEGETTE, DIANA L has run in 6 races for public office, winning 5 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $6,247,451.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Committee on Energy and Commerce
Committee on Natural Resources

Subcommittees

Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources
Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands
Subcommittee on the Environment and Climate Change
Subcommittee on Communications and Technology

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Protecting Colorado’s Wilderness

To ensure that Colorado’s most treasured landscapes remain protected – and available for generations to enjoy – Rep. DeGette is working to pass legislation known as the Colorado Wilderness Act into law.

Combatting the Climate Crisis

Rep. DeGette has been leading the charge to cut our nation’s carbon emissions, curb methane waste and pollution, and promote environmental justice – all in an effort to avoid the most devastating effects of climate change.

Preventing Gun Violence

Rep. DeGette, whose district includes Columbine High School, has been an outspoken advocate for enacting new commonsense gun safety measures to help protect our communities.

Teen Vaping Epidemic

Rep. DeGette is working to protect our children from the dangers of tobacco and nicotine.

Developing New Cures

Rep. DeGette has led the historic effort to accelerate the pace of cures and medical breakthroughs in the United States. This work continues with Cures 2.0.

Price of Insulin

As co-chair of the Congressional Diabetes Caucus, Rep. DeGette is working to lower the cost of insulin.

Environment

Protecting Colorado’s Wilderness

To ensure that Colorado’s most treasured landscapes remain protected – and available for generations to enjoy – Rep. DeGette is working to pass legislation known as the Colorado Wilderness Act into law.

Combatting the Climate Crisis

Rep. DeGette has been leading the charge to cut our nation’s carbon emissions, curb methane waste and pollution, and promote environmental justice – all in an effort to avoid the most devastating effects of climate change.

Preventing Gun Violence

Rep. DeGette, whose district includes Columbine High School, has been an outspoken advocate for enacting new commonsense gun safety measures to help protect our communities.

Teen Vaping Epidemic

Rep. DeGette is working to protect our children from the dangers of tobacco and nicotine.

Developing New Cures

Rep. DeGette has led the historic effort to accelerate the pace of cures and medical breakthroughs in the United States. This work continues with Cures 2.0.

Price of Insulin

As co-chair of the Congressional Diabetes Caucus, Rep. DeGette is working to lower the cost of insulin.

X
Joe NeguseJoe Neguse – CO2

Current Position: US Representative for CO-02 since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Other positions:
Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship
Chair, National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands subcommittee

Quote:
Voting rights can’t wait. The Senate must pass the For the People Act & John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act — and exempt legislation on constitutional rights from the filibuster to make it happen. Let’s make the #JohnLewisRule a reality.  Aug. 1, 2021

Featured Video:
Rep. Neguse delivers closing remarks for Trump impeachment trial

U.S. Rep. Joe Neguse will hold a town-hall-style discussion of the affordable housing crisis online at noon-4 p.m. Thursday.

The event will include two public listening sessions focused on affordable housing and homelessness across Colorado.

“We are at an inflection point for affordable housing, and it’s critical that we find creative solutions that meet this moment,” Neguse said in a news release.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for CO-02 since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Other positions:
Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship
Chair, National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands subcommittee

Quote:
Voting rights can’t wait. The Senate must pass the For the People Act & John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act — and exempt legislation on constitutional rights from the filibuster to make it happen. Let’s make the #JohnLewisRule a reality.  Aug. 1, 2021

Featured Video:
Rep. Neguse delivers closing remarks for Trump impeachment trial

News

U.S. Rep. Joe Neguse will hold a town-hall-style discussion of the affordable housing crisis online at noon-4 p.m. Thursday.

The event will include two public listening sessions focused on affordable housing and homelessness across Colorado.

“We are at an inflection point for affordable housing, and it’s critical that we find creative solutions that meet this moment,” Neguse said in a news release.

Twitter

About

Joe Neguse 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Joe Neguse represents Colorado’s 2nd District in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was elected to his first term in November 2018, becoming the first African-American member of Congress in Colorado history. He serves as a member of the House Judiciary Committee, the House Natural Resources Committee and the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. Additionally, he serves as Chair of the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands and Vice Chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship.

Rep. Neguse was elected by his colleagues to serve as a member of House Democratic Leadership in the 117th Congress, as Co-Chair of the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee (DPCC). In his first term, Rep. Neguse served as Co-Freshman Representative to Leadership, representing first term members at the leadership table. He also serves as one of the Congressional Progressive Caucus Vice Chairs. In 2020, he was recognized as the most bipartisan member of Colorado’s congressional delegation by the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, and received the “Spirit of Service” award from the Town Hall Project for his successful Service Town Hall initiative. During his first term in Congress, he introduced more legislation than any freshman lawmaker in the country, and has had more legislation signed into law by the President than any member of Colorado’s congressional delegation. The Center for Effective Lawmaking recently ranked Congressman Neguse among the top 10 most effective lawmakers in Congress, including as the most effective for legislation on public lands.

Before his election, Rep. Neguse served in the Governor of Colorado’s Cabinet as the Executive Director of Colorado’s consumer protection agency. As one of the youngest people to serve as a state-Cabinet secretary at age 31, he achieved key victories, including the recovery of millions of dollars for consumers, investigations culminating in significant financial-fraud cases, the championing of legislation to combat financial fraud against seniors, and the launch of the state’s first online filing system for civil rights discrimination complaints.

Previously Rep. Neguse was elected to represent Colorado’s 2nd District on the University of Colorado Board of Regents, where he served a six-year term fighting to make higher education more affordable and accessible and building consensus on tough issues, including efforts to lower student health insurance costs, increase wages for the University’s lowest paid workers and make voter registration more accessible to students. He also worked in the Colorado House of Representatives, as a Commissioner at Boulder Housing Partners and co-founded New Era Colorado, the state’s largest youth voter registration and mobilization non-profit. He received his B.S. in Political Science and Economics from the University of Colorado-Boulder, where he graduated summa cum laude, and received his J.D. from the University of Colorado School of Law.

Over 40 years ago, Rep. Neguse’s parents immigrated to the United States from Eritrea. As hardworking immigrants and naturalized citizens, they never forgot nor took for granted the freedom and opportunities the United States gave them and their children. Their experience motivated Rep. Neguse to be an active participant in our democracy at an early age, and to give back through public service. Rep. Neguse’s public service is rooted in his firm belief that we should be expanding—not restricting—opportunities for all Americans, and he has spent his career doing the same. His priorities in Congress include lowering health care costs and prescription drug prices, raising workers’ wages, ensuring greater accountability in government, protecting our treasured public lands, and fighting the existential threat of climate change.

Rep. Neguse and his wife Andrea live in Lafayette, where they are raising their young daughter, Natalie.

Committees

Representative Joe Neguse serves on House Leadership as Co-Chair of the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee (DPCC), as a member of the House Judiciary Committee, the House Natural Resources Committee and the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. Congressman Neguse also serves as the Chair of the National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands Subcommittee. In addition, he holds a position as a Vice Chair on several key subcommittees and caucuses, including serving as a Vice Chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, a Vice Chair of the Medicare for All Caucus and a Vice Chair for the Immigration and Citizenship Subcommittee.

A full list of Neguse’s Committees and Caucuses is below:

Representative Joe Neguse is a member of the House Judiciary Committee

  • Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law
  • Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship (Vice Chair)
  • Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet

the House Natural Resources Committee

  • Chair of the National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands subcommittee

The Rules Committee and the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis.

  • Subcommitte on Legislative and Budget Process
  • Subcommittee on Rules and Organization of the House

Representative Neguse holds leadership roles on the following Subcommittees and Caucuses:

  • Vice Chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus 
  • Founder and Co-Chair of the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus
  • Co-Chair of the Congressional Caucus on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Co-Chair of the Refugee Caucus
  • Co-Chair of the Intellectual Property Caucus
  • Vice Chair of the House Gun Violence Prevention Taskforce
  • Vice Chair of the Medicare for All Caucus
  • Vice Chair for Housing and Transportation for the Poverty and Opportunity Task Force

Caucuses

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV

Offices

Boulder
2503 Walnut Street, Suite 300
Boulder, CO 80302
Phone (303) 335-1045

Fort Collins
1220 S. College Avenue, Unit 100A
Fort Collins, CO 80524
Phone: (970) 372-3971

Washington, DC
1419 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-2161

Experience

Education

Offices

Boulder
2503 Walnut Street, Suite 300
Boulder, CO 80302
Phone: (303) 335-1045

Fort Collins
1220 S. College Avenue, Unit 100A
Fort Collins, CO 80524
Phone: (970) 372-3971

Washington D.C.
1419 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-2161

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

 

Wikipedia entry

Joseph D. Neguse (/nəˈɡs/ nə-GOOS;[1][2] born May 13, 1984) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Colorado’s 2nd congressional district since 2019. The district is based in Boulder and includes many of Denver‘s northwestern suburbs, as well as Fort Collins. A member of the Democratic Party, he was a Regent of the University of Colorado from 2008 to 2015.[3] Neguse is the first Eritrean-American elected to the United States Congress and Colorado’s first black member of Congress.[4]

Early life

Neguse’s parents immigrated to the United States from Eritrea. They met while living in Bakersfield, California, where they married and had Joe and his younger sister.[5] The family moved to Colorado when he was six years old. After living in Aurora, Littleton, and Highlands Ranch, the family settled in Boulder.[6] Neguse graduated from ThunderRidge High School,[5] the University of Colorado Boulder with a bachelor’s degree in political science and economics summa cum laude in 2005, and the University of Colorado Law School with his Juris Doctor in 2009.[7]

Earlier career

While he was a student, Neguse founded New Era Colorado, an organization to get young people involved in politics. He worked at the Colorado State Capitol as an assistant to Andrew Romanoff when Romanoff was a member of the Colorado House of Representatives. In 2008 Neguse was elected to the Regents of the University of Colorado, representing Colorado’s 2nd congressional district.[8]

Neguse ran for Secretary of State of Colorado in 2014,[9][10][11] losing to Wayne W. Williams, 47.5% to 44.9%.[12] Governor John Hickenlooper appointed Neguse the executive director of the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies (DORA) in June 2015.[13]

In 2017, Neguse resigned from DORA to run in the 2018 elections for the United States House of Representatives in Colorado’s 2nd congressional district, seeking to succeed Jared Polis, who successfully ran for governor of Colorado.[14] He also joined the law firm Snell & Wilmer, working in administrative law.[15]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2018

On June 13, 2017, Neguse announced he would run for the Democratic nomination after incumbent U.S. Representative Jared Polis announced he would not run for reelection and would run for governor of Colorado.[16][17] In the June 26, 2018, Democratic primary—the real contest in this heavily Democratic district—Neguse faced businessman and former Boulder County Democratic Party chairman Mark Williams.[18] Neguse defeated Williams with 65.7% of the vote, winning all 10 counties in the district.[19][20]

Neguse then defeated the Republican nominee, businessman Peter Yu, in the November 6 general election, receiving 60.2% of the vote, and winning all but two counties.[21][22] Neguse became the first African-American to represent Colorado in the House.[23][24]

Tenure

Neguse voted for the impeachment of Donald Trump in 2019.[25] In 2020, he was named the most bipartisan member of the Colorado congressional delegation by the Lugar Center.[26]

On January 12, 2021, Neguse voted to impeach Trump a second time, and was named as a House impeachment manager for the second impeachment trial.[27]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Civil rights

Neguse supports the Equality Act.[25]

Racial equality

Neguse supports the Voting Rights Act and co-sponsored the Emmett Till Antilynching Act.[25]

Climate change

Neguse calls climate change an “existential threat.” He has introduced legislation to create an expansion of the Civilian Conservation Corps to focus on forest management and wildfire mitigation.[26] Neguse opposed the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. He supports the Green New Deal.[29]

Drugs

He supports the national legalization of cannabis.[29]

Energy

He supports efforts to increase fuel efficiency and federal incentives for renewable energy use.[29]

Environment

Neguse supports endangered wildlife protections, including sponsoring bills to support wildlife protections on the South Platte River. He also wants to expand the size of Arapaho National Forest.[25]

Health care

Neguse supports Medicare for All and a universal health care. He also supports mandatory coverage of preexisting conditions and opposes repealing the Affordable Care Act.[29]

COVID-19

He supports the national expansion of COVID-19 testing and voted in support of stimulus funding related to the pandemic. Neguse opposed the Trump administration’s decision to leave the World Health Organization during the pandemic.[29]

Government reform

Elections and voting rights

Neguse supports national mail-in voting.[29] He also supports the Voting Rights Act and has introduced legislation to allow people aged 16 and 17 to preregister to vote.[25]

Gun law

Neguse supports universal background checks and believes there are limitations to the Second Amendment.[29]

Immigration

Neguse supports a pathway for citizenship for undocumented immigrants in the US and the DREAM Act.[29][25]

Military

He opposes increased military spending.[29]

Law enforcement

Neguse supports police reform.[29]

Taxes

He opposes the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[29]

Electoral history

Democratic primary results, Colorado 2018[30]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Joe Neguse 76,829 65.74%
DemocraticMark Williams40,04434.26%
Total votes116,873 100%
Colorado’s 2nd congressional district results, 2018[31]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Joe Neguse 259,608 60.27%
RepublicanPeter Yu144,90133.64%
IndependentNick Thomas16,3563.80%
LibertarianRoger Barris9,7492.26%
Write-in1510.03%
Total votes430,765 100%
Democratic hold
Colorado’s 2nd congressional district results, 2020[32]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Joe Neguse (incumbent) 316,925 61.5%
RepublicanCharles Winn182,54735.4%
LibertarianThom Atkinson13,6572.6%
UnityGary Swing2,5340.5%
Total votes515,663 100%
Democratic hold

Personal life

Neguse is married to Andrea Jimenez Rael.[33] They met in Boulder County.[25] Their daughter[26] was born in August 2018.[4][34] They live in Lafayette, south of Boulder.[35]

See also

References

  1. ^ Rep. Joe Neguse [@RepJoeNeguse] (August 14, 2020). “Americans rely on #USPS to deliver medicine, paychecks, social security, ballots and more. The President’s attempt to sabotage and undermine these critical services in the middle of a pandemic is unconscionable and dangerous. We cannot let this stand” (Tweet). Retrieved November 8, 2020 – via Twitter.
  2. ^ Rep. Joe Neguse [@RepJoeNeguse] (October 26, 2020). “The terrible wildfires our state and community have experienced have taken a very heavy toll. But Coloradans are resilient. And I know that — working together — we will overcome these challenges. #ColoradoStrong #EastTroublesomeFire #CameronPeakFire” (Tweet). Retrieved November 8, 2020 – via Twitter.
  3. ^ “The Human Limits of Human Capital: An Overview of Noncompete Agreements and Best Practices for Protecting Trade Secrets from Unlawful Misappropriation” (PDF).
  4. ^ a b “Parents’ Journey Inspired US Congress’ 1st Eritrean-American”. VOA. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  5. ^ a b Swinnerton, Jamie (June 19, 2014). “Joe Neguse — “I go by Joe” — on his run for Secretary of State”. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  6. ^ Michael Roberts (August 31, 2018). “Joe Neguse Interview About Colorado Second District Congressional Run 2018”. Westword. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  7. ^ “2008 Candidate Profile: Joseph Neguse, Democrat”. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  8. ^ “Neguse, Fitz-Gerald assembly winners – Boulder Daily Camera”. Dailycamera.com. July 30, 2009. Archived from the original on October 11, 2018. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  9. ^ Daily, Boulder (June 24, 2013). “CU Regent Joe Neguse seeks Democratic nod for secretary of state – The Denver Post”. Denverpost.com. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  10. ^ “Democrat Joe Neguse files for SoS – Colorado Politics”. Coloradostatesman.com. June 27, 2013. Archived from the original on January 10, 2016. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  11. ^ Lynn Bartels (April 10, 2014). “Joe Neguse, son of immigrants, runs for Colorado secretary of state”. Blogs.denverpost.com. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  12. ^ “GOP sweeps statewide seats for second election in a row – Colorado Politics”. Coloradostatesman.com. November 7, 2014. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  13. ^ “Secretary Williams touts one-time rival, Joe Neguse, for cabinet post – Lynn Bartels on SOS.state.co.us”. bartels-on.sos.state.co.us. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  14. ^ Matthews, Mark K. (June 13, 2017). “Joe Neguse declares run for Jared Polis’ seat in Congress – The Denver Post”. Denverpost.com. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  15. ^ Paul, Jesse (August 29, 2017). “Joe Neguse joins Denver law office of Snell & Wilmer”. Denverpost.com. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  16. ^ “Joe Neguse declares run for Jared Polis’ seat in Congress”. The Denver Post. June 13, 2017. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  17. ^ “Neguse resigning as DORA executive director, running for Congress”. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  18. ^ “Congressional candidates want Medicare for all and to impeach Trump. Money divides them”. Coloradoan. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  19. ^ “Election Night Reporting”. results.enr.clarityelections.com. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  20. ^ “Colorado Primary Election Results: Second House District”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  21. ^ “Election Night Reporting”. results.enr.clarityelections.com. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  22. ^ “Colorado Election Results: Second House District”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  23. ^ “Joe Neguse Becomes First African-American To Represent Colorado In Congress”. November 6, 2018. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  24. ^ “Joe Neguse wins 2nd Congressional District seat, becomes Colorado’s 1st black congressman”. The Denver Post. November 7, 2018. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g “Joe Neguse”. Colorado Encyclopedia. July 6, 2020.
  26. ^ a b c Marmaduke, Jacy (October 14, 2020). “Colorado Congressional election: Q&A with U.S. Rep. Joe Neguse”. The Coloradoan.
  27. ^ “Pelosi Names Impeachment Managers”. Speaker Nancy Pelosi. January 12, 2021. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  28. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Retrieved March 29, 2021.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k “Colorado CD2 2020: Rep. Joe Neguse, Charlie Winn On The Issues”. Colorado Public Radio. October 12, 2020.
  30. ^ “2018 Colorado Democratic primary election results”. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  31. ^ “2018 Colorado general election results”. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  32. ^ “2020 General Election – Official Compiled Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  33. ^ Roy, Lisa (January 12, 2020). “Joseph (Joe) Neguse (1984- ) •”.
  34. ^ “2nd Congressional District candidates meet in quest to replace Jared Polis”. Broomfield Enterprise. August 29, 2018. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  35. ^ Lundquist, Paulette (November 28, 2018). “Neguse”. TheHill.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Colorado’s 2nd congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
335th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Joe Neguse (D)259,60860.3%
Peter Yu (R)144,90133.6%
TOTAL404,509

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

NEGUSE, JOE has run in 1 race for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $31,926.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Judiciary Committee
House Natural Resources Committee
Select Committee on the Climate Crisis

Subcommittees

Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law
Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship
Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife
Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Civil Rights

Economy

ECONOMY

A strong, stable economy rests on supporting businesses and working families. In order for positive economic growth to continue, Congress must pursue policies that allow employees to benefit from the financial gains of companies; promote job creation for small businesses; and build ladders of opportunity to create economic mobility.

Growing the Middle Class
Despite recent growth in the stock market, we continue to see stagnated wages and growing economic inequality. The rising costs of child-care, increasing housing costs, lack of paid sick and family leave, as well as the inability for many workers to invest in retirement plans, creates significant barriers to growing wealth. Representative Neguse is fighting to ensure that American workers have basic workplace protections and fair wages that families need in order to pursue their economic goals. Representative Neguse supports fair wage policies such as the Paycheck Fairness Act and Raise the Wage legislation to increase the minimum wage to $15 to ensure that we build out an economy that works for everyone.

Housing
Access to affordable housing is the cornerstone to helping communities, families, and businesses thrive. A healthy housing market provides a mix of housing options – both homeownership and affordable apartments – for all households on the income spectrum. Numerous studies have proven that stable housing has benefits beyond putting a roof over one’s head, including improved early childhood education outcomes and reducing chronic health conditions. However, many Coloradans find themselves dedicating more of their income on housing costs as rental markets have tightened and housing sale prices have soared. Representative Neguse is working to balance the housing system to help Colorado families have access to housing that best meets their needs and financial goals while ensuring salaries can keep pace with the higher costs.

Small Businesses, Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Small businesses form the engine of our economy, making up nearly half of private-sector employment. Fostering an environment for entrepreneurs to pursue their business goals, enabling small businesses to grow and allowing employees to partake in the growth of a company not only builds a strong economy, but also creates a sustainable one.

Tax Reform
The success of businesses and workers depends on fundamentally reforming the tax code. By limiting deductions and eliminating special interest loopholes we can support job creation, encourage investments in small businesses and help working families keep more money in their pockets. We need a simple and fair tax code that ensures predictability for businesses, individuals and our federal budget.

Consumer Protection
Having served as director of Colorado’s consumer protection agency, Representative Neguse is committed to protecting the civil rights of every Coloradan and strengthening consumer protections and safeguards. As Vice Chair of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law, Representative Neguse will continue to champion legislation on behalf of consumers.

Environment

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT

Colorado’s lands, air and water are the heart of our state’s character, and sustain our livelihoods. Visitors from across the globe come to Colorado year-round to get a taste of what we’re surrounded by every day. In Colorado, we see first-hand that the health of our environment directly relates to the health of our citizens and the health of our economy. We owe it to future generations to protect everything around us that we love.

America is a beautiful, innovative country, but for too long, we have ignored the poisonous pollution leaking into our skies and rivers. It’s past time to act. Representative Neguse is committed to the fight for clean air, clean water, and preservation of our public lands and natural resources. He supports bold action to combat climate change by increasing investments in renewable energy, supporting the research of Federal research labs throughout Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District and drastically reducing carbon emissions by eliminating subsidies for fossil-fuel companies. We must reject the false choice between a clean planet and economic prosperity. As a member of the Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC), an action-based caucus in the U.S. House of Representatives, Representative Neguse is working with his colleagues in the Congress and the Administration to advance policies that recognize these important priorities.

Climate Change
Climate change is an existential threat that we need to begin tackling head on. In Colorado, we already see the first-hand effects of a changing climate and its impact on our ecosystems including flooding, droughts, and more intense storms. Our state’s recreation-based industries have a lot to lose as well: threatening skiing, hiking and backpacking, rafting, fishing, and wildlife dependent activities. Backcountry enthusiasts flock to Colorado to enjoy our natural wonders; global climate change could damage this important sector of Colorado’s economy. Simply put, Colorado has a vested stake in the health of our world’s climate.

As one of 15 members appointed to serve on the House Select Committee on Climate Change, Representative Neguse plans to fight for bold action on climate change. We must put science before special interests as we shape public policy. Together, we must change our attitudes and behavior to slow the dangerous pattern of global climate change.

Public Lands
Over 50% of Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District is designated public lands. Colorado’s landscape goes hand in hand with its people and its character, and we are lucky to have so many beautiful places set aside as public lands. Colorado’s economy relies on the health of those public lands and draws masses of visitors every year to explore everything from Rocky Mountain National Park to the Indian Peaks Wilderness, from hiking the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness to skiing on our world-class slopes in the White River National Forest.

It is imperative that we keep these lands pristine. Environmental protection and lands stewardship where necessary directly affects our public health, our local economies and the world our children will encounter.

Representative Neguse is working with his colleagues to ensure that our public lands continue to be protected not only for our future generations but also for the sake of maintaining their natural state and the wildlife and vegetation that depend on it.  He is also supporting new wilderness areas that will protect these lands while never forgetting the people that live on their boundaries and enjoy recreating in them.

Already in the 116th Congress, Representative Neguse has seen passage of two of his first pieces of legislation, the Bolts Ditch Use and Access Act and the Arapaho National Forest Boundary Adjustment (WEDGE) Act, both of which directly impact the public lands in Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District.

Rocky Mountain National Park

Arapaho National Forest and Roosevelt National Forest

Wildland Fire Management

White River National Forest

Pike and San Isabel National Forest and Cimarron and Comanche National Grasslands (PSICC)

Energy Development
It is now time to think about energy in a holistic, sustainable and long-term way. By encouraging long-term investments in renewable, clean energy, we can create millions of jobs, and we can make a rapid change for the better.

Our nation’s energy future won’t be found under Colorado’s mountains, in Canada’s oil sands, Alaska’s wildlife refuges or on the Outer Continental Shelf.  We have to secure a long term Production Tax Credit that will grow rapid investment in green jobs workforce training that will help drive down costs and we must form a responsible carbon pricing policy that will help spur innovation, invest in new technologies, and sustainable communities that save our planet.

Department of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Find Alternative Fuel Stations

Find Grants and Financial Assistance

Games and Tips for Kids

Education Resources

Energy Star

Health Care

HEALTHCARE

Representative Neguse believes that all Americans have the right to high-quality, affordable health care. He is committed to defending against efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, fighting for Medicare-For-All and lowering prescription drug prices. One of the first pieces of legislation he co sponsored in the 116th Congress was a legislative package to provide sweeping cost relief to American consumers purchase of prescription drugs and he seeks to make affordable healthcare one of his priority issues in the 116th Congress.

Medicare for All
The Affordable Care Act was a critically important step towards the goal of universal healthcare, allowing for 22 million Americans to gain health insurance for the first time, young adults to stay on their parent’s health plans until they’re 26 and individuals with pre-existing conditions to benefit from increased protections. As we move forward, though, we must continue to build on the success of the ACA to achieve the goal of universal health care.

Twenty-nine million Americans today still do not have health insurance and millions more are underinsured and cannot afford the high copayments and deductibles charged by private health insurance companies that put profits before people. Healthcare must be recognized as a right, not a privilege. The only long-term solution to America’s health-care crisis is a single-payer national health care program. Representative Neguse supports the Medicare for All Act which would reduce overhead and administration costs in our healthcare system, focus federal investments on training health care providers, build on the strength of the 50 years of success of the Medicare program and finally separate health insurance from employment. He is also a Vice Chair of the Medicare for All caucus.

Lowering the Cost of Prescription Drugs
Today, American consumers pay far more for drugs than it costs to manufacture them. The government is giving exclusive monopoly to pharmaceuticals, and it has to stop. Lowering prescription drug prices and providing cost relief to Americans has to be a priority. A life-saving drug does no good if the people who need it cannot afford that drug. Representative Neguse supports efforts to allow for Medicare to negotiate for lower prescription drug prices with prescription drug companies, as the Veterans Administration currently does. He also supports efforts to allow American consumers and pharmacies to import drugs from Canada and other major countries. Fundamentally, Representative Neguse believes we must get the profit motive out of our healthcare system, this begins with putting a check on the pharmaceutical companies’ reckless price hikes and lowering prescription drug prices across the board.

Medicare
Representative Neguse views Medicare as an indispensable social safety net. Approximately 50 million Americans receive coverage through the program each year, including nearly 900,000 Colorado seniors. Representative Neguse is committed to ensuring the long-term sustainability of the program for future generations, and will oppose any legislation that undermines the opportunity for our seniors to maintain a healthy and productive standard of living after they retire.

X
Lauren BoebertLauren Boebert – CO3

Current Position: US Representative for CO-02 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
Vice-Chair, Congressional Western Caucus

Quote: 
Here are my thoughts on mask mandates politicians and bureaucrats are making for school children. If you agree, please join me at LaurenForFreedom.com.

Featured Video:
Rep. Boebert: “Democrats need to keep their dirty, filthy, corrupt, greedy hands off of our rights”

Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., called for the immediate removal of President Joe Biden and replacing him with “righteous men and women of God.”

The Colorado Republican spoke Saturday at a conference hosted by the right-wing Truth & Liberty Coalition at Charis Bible College, where she called for the impeachment of Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris as part of a conservative Christian revolution against democratically elected leaders, reported Right Wing Watch.

“When we see Biden address the nation and the world and show more contempt and aggravation and aggression towards unvaccinated Americans than he does terrorists, we have a problem,” Boebert said, “and that’s why I have articles of impeachment to impeach Joe Biden, Kamala Harris.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for CO-02 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
Vice-Chair, Congressional Western Caucus

Quote: 
Here are my thoughts on mask mandates politicians and bureaucrats are making for school children. If you agree, please join me at LaurenForFreedom.com.

Featured Video:
Rep. Boebert: “Democrats need to keep their dirty, filthy, corrupt, greedy hands off of our rights”

News

Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., called for the immediate removal of President Joe Biden and replacing him with “righteous men and women of God.”

The Colorado Republican spoke Saturday at a conference hosted by the right-wing Truth & Liberty Coalition at Charis Bible College, where she called for the impeachment of Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris as part of a conservative Christian revolution against democratically elected leaders, reported Right Wing Watch.

“When we see Biden address the nation and the world and show more contempt and aggravation and aggression towards unvaccinated Americans than he does terrorists, we have a problem,” Boebert said, “and that’s why I have articles of impeachment to impeach Joe Biden, Kamala Harris.”

Twitter

About

Lauren Boebert 1

Source: Government page

U.S. Congresswoman Lauren Boebert is serving her first term as the Representative for Colorado’s Third Congressional District. A citizen legislator, Congresswoman Boebert had never held public office prior to her 2020 Congressional victory.

She is the Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus, Vice-Chairman of the Congressional Western Caucus, an Ex-Officio Steering Member on the Republican Study Committee, and an active member of the House Freedom Caucus.

Congresswoman Boebert is 35 years old and is from Rifle, Colorado. She is the first woman, first mother, and youngest ever to represent Colorado’s Third District. She is the owner and operator of Shooters Grill, a Western-themed restaurant where staff open-carry.

Representative Boebert was raised in a Democrat household on welfare. Her senior year of high school, she earned an opportunity to serve as an assistant manager at her local McDonald’s. She made the difficult decision to drop out of school to help put food on her family’s table, realizing she could provide better for herself than the government ever could.

Congresswoman Boebert is active in her church and spent years as a volunteer, counseling and assisting at-risk women at the local jail with reentering society and becoming contributing members in their communities.

She has worked as a natural gas product technician, GIS technician, and pipeline integrity coordinator. Congresswoman Boebert is married to a natural gas drilling foreman who has worked his entire adult life in the oil and gas fields.

Congresswoman Boebert ran because Washington is broken and she was tired of career politicians failing to uphold their promises and serve the people they were supposed to represent.

Representative Boebert is a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, first gaining national notoriety when she confronted then-presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke and told him “hell no, you aren’t taking our guns”. When 21 Democrats petitioned Nancy Pelosi to stop Congresswoman Boebert from carrying on Capitol Hill, she led the charge to defeat this unconstitutional overreach and earned the support of 82 of her colleagues who joined her in fighting this gun grab.

America needs more bold, conservative, young, female leaders. Rep. Boebert will challenge the status quo and change Washington, not let Washington change her.

Congresswoman Boebert supports legislation that allows for more individual liberty, more freedom and less government intrusion into our daily lives. She will always defend the Constitution and protect our Republic.

Representative Boebert is a fiscal hawk, fighting to eliminate waste, fraud and abuse wherever she can. She is focused on policies that foster an environment for economic growth and job creation.

Congresswoman Boebert is working to secure the border, terminate amnesty policies and build the wall. She is focused on improving care for our nation’s veterans and ensuring our men and women in uniform have the resources necessary to safely accomplish their missions.

Congresswoman Boebert believes in empowering We the People. The priorities of the citizens living in Colorado’s Third Congressional District are her priorities.

Committees

Committee on Natural Resources, the Subcommittee on Indigenous Peoples of the United States, the Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife, and the Committee on the Budget.

Caucuses

Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
House Freedom Caucus
Vice-Chairman of the Congressional Western Caucus
Ex-Officio Steering Member on the Republican Study Committee
Values Action Team

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV

Offices

1609 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-4761
503 N. Main
Suite 426

Pueblo, CO  81003

Phone: (719) 696-6970
743 Horizon Court
Suite 112

Grand Junction, CO  81506

Phone: (970) 208-0460
835 E. 2nd Ave.
Suite 204

Durango, CO  81301

Phone: (970) 317-6130

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Wikipedia, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Lauren Opal Boebert (/ˈbbərt/ BOH-bərt; née Roberts, December 15, 1986) is an American politician, businesswoman, and gun-rights activist. A member of the Republican Party, she has served as the U.S. Representative for Colorado’s 3rd congressional district since 2021.

Boebert owns Shooters Grill, a restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, where staff members are encouraged to openly carry firearms. She ran as a Republican for Colorado’s 3rd congressional district in 2020; Boebert defeated incumbent U.S. Representative Scott Tipton in the primary election and the Democratic nominee, former state Representative Diane Mitsch Bush, in the general election. She has close connections to militia groups such as the Oath Keepers and Three Percenters.[1][2]

Early life and business career

Boebert was born in Altamonte Springs, Florida, on December 15, 1986.[3][4] When she was 12, she and her family moved to the Montbello neighborhood of Denver and later to Aurora, Colorado, before settling in Rifle, Colorado, in 2003.[5][6]

Boebert has said that she “grew up in a Democratic home”[7] and that her mother received welfare in Denver.[8] By 2001, when Boebert was 14, her mother registered as a Republican.[9] Boebert credits her first job at 15 years old, at a McDonald’s restaurant, for changing her views about whether government assistance is necessary.[5][10]

Boebert dropped out of high school during her senior year (she would have graduated in 2004) because she had a child, and took a job as an assistant manager at a McDonald’s in Rifle.[11][12] She later got a job filing for a natural gas drilling company and then became a pipeliner, a member of a team that builds and maintains pipelines and pumping stations.[13] She obtained her GED in 2020, about a month before her first election primary.[11][14]

In 2015, Boebert was arrested in Mesa County for making a public disturbance at a music festival. In 2016, she pleaded guilty to an unsafe vehicle charge after rolling her car into a ditch late at night. In 2017, her restaurant was responsible for over 80 cases of food poisoning at the Garfield County Rodeo after serving food without a license.[15]

Small business ownership

Boebert at Shooters Grill

Boebert and her husband opened Shooters Grill in Rifle, west of Glenwood Springs, in 2013. Boebert claims she obtained a concealed carry permit after a man was “beat to death by another man’s hands … outside of [her] restaurant”, and began encouraging the restaurant’s servers to open carry firearms.[16][17][18] The claim about the man was false: in 2013, a man who had reportedly engaged in a fight blocks away ran to within about a block of Boebert’s restaurant and collapsed and died from a methamphetamine overdose.[18][19]

The Boeberts also owned the since-closed Smokehouse 1776 restaurant across the street from Shooters Grill.[20][21] In 2015, Boebert opened Putters restaurant on Rifle Creek Golf Course.[22] She sold it in December 2016.[23]

In 2017, 80 people who attended a Garfield County fair became ill from food poisoning after eating pork sliders from a temporary location set up by Shooters Grill and Smokehouse 1776. They did not have the required permits to operate the temporary location, and the Garfield County health department determined that the outbreak was caused by unsafe food handling at the event.[20][24][5]

According to The Guardian, “Boebert made a name for herself after loudly protesting against the Democratic state governor Jared Polis‘s orders to close businesses to fight the coronavirus pandemic.”[25] In mid-May 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, Boebert violated the state’s stay-at-home order by reopening Shooters Grill for dine-in service.[26] She received a cease and desist order from Garfield County but said she would not close her business.[27] The next day she moved tables outside, onto the sidewalk, and in parking spaces.[28] The following day, Garfield County suspended her food license.[29] By late May, with the state allowing restaurants to reopen at 50% capacity, the county dropped its temporary restraining order.[30]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

Boebert speaking at Turning Point USA‘s December 2020 Student Action Summit in Palm Beach, Florida[31]

Boebert with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis in 2021

In September 2019, Boebert made national headlines when she confronted Beto O’Rourke, a candidate in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, at an Aurora town hall meeting over his proposal for a buy-back program and a ban on assault-style rifles like AR-15s.[32][33][12][34] Later that month, she opposed a measure banning guns in city-owned buildings at a meeting of the Aspen City Council.[35][34] The ordinance passed unanimously a month later.[36]

Boebert was an organizer of the December 2019 “We Will Not Comply!” rally opposing Colorado’s red flag law that allows guns to be taken from people deemed a threat. The American Patriots Three Percent militia, affiliated with the Three Percenters, provided security, and members of the Proud Boys attended the rally.[37][38] On Twitter, Boebert has used rhetoric friendly to the Three Percenters and deleted a 2019 tweet in which she posed with members of the group after being asked about it. She tweeted “I am the militia” during her congressional campaign.[39][40]

In December 2019, Boebert announced her candidacy for Colorado’s 3rd congressional district of the United States House of Representatives in the 2020 elections, beginning with a challenge to five-term incumbent Scott Tipton in the Republican primary.[41] During her campaign, Boebert criticized Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and other members of “The Squad“, positioning herself as a conservative alternative to Ocasio-Cortez.[42][43][44] Seth Masket, a political science professor at the University of Denver, suggested that Boebert wanted to motivate Republican voters to participate in the primary during a slow election cycle by stirring up their anger at Ocasio-Cortez and others.[42]

Boebert criticized Tipton’s voting record, which she said did not reflect the 3rd district. Before the primary, President Donald Trump endorsed Tipton.[45] During the campaign, Boebert characterized Tipton as unsupportive of Trump.[42] She accused Tipton of supporting amnesty for undocumented immigrants by voting for H.R. 5038, the Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2019, saying that the act has a provision that leads to citizenship and also provides funding to undocumented farm workers for housing.[46] Boebert criticized Tipton’s efforts on funding for the Paycheck Protection Program, saying that he did not fight hard enough for more money for the program, which ran out of money within two weeks.[47] In her campaign against Tipton, Boebert raised just over $150,000 through the June 30 primary.[48]

In a May 2020 interview on SteelTruth, a QAnon-supporting web show, Boebert said she was “very familiar with” the conspiracy theory: “Everything I’ve heard of Q, I hope that this is real because it only means America is getting stronger and better.”[49][50][51][52][53] QAnon, which the FBI has classified as a domestic terrorism threat and which has been called a cult, is a far-right conspiracy network.[54][55] Six days after winning the June 2020 Republican primary, Boebert said of QAnon, “I’m not a follower. QAnon is a lot of things to different people. I was very vague in what I said before. I’m not into conspiracies. I’m into freedom and the Constitution of the United States of America. I’m not a follower.”[56][57]

In September 2019, Boebert aide and future campaign manager Sherrona Bishop published a video on her Facebook page in which she interviewed a self-proclaimed member of the white nationalist group Proud Boys, which Bishop called “pro-everything that makes America great”, adding “thank God for you guys and the Proud Boys”. Bishop left the Boebert campaign shortly after Boebert won the Republican nomination in June 2020. In October 2020, the Boebert campaign denied any connection to the Proud Boys and said Boebert did not share Bishop’s views.[58][59]

2020 primary election

On June 30, 2020, Boebert won the Republican nomination with 54.6% of the vote to Tipton’s 45.4%.[60] The result gained national attention and surprised political commentators. Both CNN and Politico called it a “stunning upset”;[34][61] The Hill made a similar statement.[62] Tipton conceded defeat on election night, and Trump congratulated Boebert in a tweet.[63] Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chair Cheri Bustos said in a statement that national Republicans should disavow Boebert for her support of QAnon.[61]

Boebert was the first primary challenger to defeat a sitting U.S. Representative in Colorado in 48 years, since Democratic Representative Wayne Aspinall lost to Alan Merson.[64][65] She pledged to join the Freedom Caucus upon taking office.[45]

2020 general election

Boebert faced Democratic former state representative Diane Mitsch Bush, a retired sociology professor from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, in the November general election. Boebert said that she believed Mitsch Bush’s “platform is more government control” and that Mitsch Bush had a “socialist agenda”.[64] In late July, Boebert was considered the front-runner.[5] A survey taken in September and paid for by Michael Bloomberg‘s Democratic-leaning House Majority PAC had Mitsch Bush ahead by one percentage point.[66] On November 3, Boebert defeated Mitsch Bush, 51.27% to 45.41%. Boebert raised $2.4 million and Mitsch Bush $4.2 million.[67] Republican groups spent more than $5 million. Democratic groups spent nearly $4 million.[67] Boebert focused her general election campaign on gun rights, energy, and the Constitution.[68][69]

Boebert reimbursed herself $22,259 for mileage costs in 2020 from her campaign’s finances, which legally would require her to have driven 38,712 miles (62,300 km). The Denver Post reported in early February 2021 that three ethics experts said that the high figure was suspicious. Boebert’s campaign attributed the figure to Boebert’s “aggressive travel schedule”, but members of her campaign did not provide evidence for the amount of travel.[70] CPR News calculated that it was plausible that Boebert had driven 30,000 miles based on her visits to 129 events.[71] Boebert said in a mid-February interview that she “drove tens of thousands of miles … I had to make those connections, and really, I underreported a lot of stuff.”[72] In late February 2021, Boebert’s campaign updated its campaign finance filing, reclassifying $3,053 claimed for mileage to “hotels”, and $867 claimed for mileage to Uber rides, thus claiming a mileage of around 30,000 miles.[72]

Despite campaign finance laws and ethics laws requiring Congressional candidates to reveal their immediate family’s income sources to show potential conflicts of interest, Boebert did not report her husband’s income in her 2020 filing, instead belatedly revealing it in August 2021,[73] the same day the Federal Election Commission sent her a letter investigating her campaign expenses.[74] The filing, while misnaming the company involved, stated that her husband Jayson earned $460,000 in 2019 and $478,000 in 2020 as a consultant for Terra Energy, one of Colorado’s largest natural gas producers and fourth nationwide in methane emissions.[73][75] The company told The Daily Beast that Jayson was a contracted shift worker for the company who was not paid directly but through another company, Boebert Consulting.[76] As of 2021, Colorado classified Boebert Consulting as a delinquent company due to the lack of filings or registered agent with the state.[74] Boebert oversees the energy industry via her position on the House Committee on Natural Resources.[76]

2022 campaign

In August 2021, the FEC investigated the apparent use of more than $6,000 of funds from Boebert’s 2022 reelection campaign for Boebert’s personal expenses.[77] The funds were used between May 2021 and June 2021 via four Venmo payments.[77] Boebert’s communications director said that these were indeed personal expenses, “billed to the campaign account in error”, and that the “reimbursement has already happened”.[77] In September 2021, Boebert submitted documents to the FEC declaring that the campaign money had been used to settle rental and utilities bills, and had since been reimbursed.[78]

Tenure

In March 2021, Boebert was one of 14 House Republicans, most of them members of the right-wing Freedom Caucus,[79] who voted against a measure condemning the Myanmar coup d’état that passed overwhelmingly.[80][79]

In June 2021, the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant was first detected in Colorado in Mesa County, in Boebert’s congressional district. As the variant spread to make up 50% of Mesa County’s COVID-19 cases, Boebert’s Twitter account posted: “The easiest way to make the Delta variant go away is to turn off CNN. And vote Republican.” The tweet was quickly deleted amid public criticism.[81][82]

Opposition to Capitol Hill firearms regulations

On January 1, 2021, Boebert asked House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy in a letter co-signed by more than 80 Republicans to uphold the 1967 law exempting members of Congress from a Capitol Hill ban on firearms, which allowed them to keep arms in their offices.[83]

Having said in November 2020 that she planned to carry a gun while working on Capitol Hill,[13][84] Boebert published a viral video advertisement on January 4, 2021, showing her placing a handgun in a hip holster and walking through Capitol Hill, near federal buildings and through alleys. Her spokesman later said that she had not been carrying a gun during the walk.[83] The video was made by the same consulting firm that produced the viral August 2020 campaign video for House candidate Kimberly Klacik.[85]

On January 5, Boebert refused a bag check after she set off the newly installed Capitol Hill metal detectors, and entered the Capitol. She did the same on January 6, refusing to stop for a wand check after she set off the metal detector. Boebert called the metal detectors “just another political stunt by Speaker Pelosi”.[86][87] A New York Times profile of Boebert characterized her actions as “a made-for-Twitter moment that delighted the far right” The article said that although she had only been in Congress for a few days, she has “already arranged several episodes that showcased her brand of far-right defiance as a conspiracy theorist” and that she “represents an incoming faction of the party for whom breaking the rules—and gaining notoriety for doing it—is exactly the point.”[88]

Role in storming of the Capitol

On January 5, the day before the storming of the United States Capitol, Boebert tweeted, “Remember these next 48 hours. These are some of the most important days in American history.”[89] On January 6, in the hours before the Capitol was attacked, Boebert tweeted, “Today is 1776,” a reference to the American Revolutionary War.[90] During the counting of the Electoral College votes, Boebert objected to counting Arizona‘s votes in a speech to the joint session of Congress. She said, “The members who stand here today and accept the results of this concentrated, coordinated, partisan effort by Democrats—where every fraudulent vote canceled out the vote of an honest American—have sided with the extremist left.”[91]

On the morning of January 6, Boebert said during a House floor speech, “Madam Speaker, I have constituents outside this building right now.”[92] Numerous members and associates of Three Percenters and similar far-right groups were subsequently indicted on conspiracy charges for involvement in the attack.[93][94]

Democratic politicians in Colorado accused Boebert and her colleague Doug Lamborn of “helping incite violence” during the storming of the Capitol.[95][96] While the Capitol was being stormed, Boebert posted information on Twitter about the police response and pinpointed the location of other members, including that Speaker Nancy Pelosi had left the chamber. She faced calls to resign for endangering members’ safety.[97][98][99] On January 13, 2021, Twitter blocked Boebert’s account until after January 20 because she had violated Twitter’s rules.[100] Hours later, Twitter unblocked Boebert’s account, saying its staff “took the incorrect enforcement action”.[101]

Boebert’s communications director resigned on January 16 in response to the events of January 6.[102]

In June 2021, Boebert was one of 21 House Republicans to vote against a resolution to give the Congressional Gold Medal to police officers who defended the U.S. Capitol.[103]

Conservative Political Action Conference attendance

In late February 2021, Boebert and a dozen other Republican House members skipped votes and enlisted others to vote for them, citing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, while actually attending the Conservative Political Action Conference, which was held at the same time as their absences.[104] In response, the Campaign for Accountability, an ethics watchdog group, filed a complaint with the House Committee on Ethics and requested an investigation into Boebert and the other lawmakers.[105]

Support for conspiracy theories

During a March 15, 2021, town hall in Montrose, Colorado, announced only to local Republicans who were asked to not disclose it publicly, Boebert was asked when Hillary Clinton and other former officials would be arrested, a recurring theme of the QAnon conspiracy theory. Boebert responded that she knew an individual involved with documents declassified by Trump during the closing days of his presidency, that the documents would reveal corruption and that “I believe we will see resignations begin to take place” that will allow Republicans to retake the House and Senate before 2022, echoing a theory promoted by The Epoch Times. Boebert added, “So anyone who tries and tells you that this is a fringe newspaper, don’t listen to them. I have very good sources that tell me this is very good information.”[106][107][108] She also appeared to defend the January 6 attackers on the Capitol, saying, “We already see in Washington, D.C. You can’t petition your government. You’re an insurrectionist if you do that!” She later claimed that her remarks were “in reference to the ongoing security measures in place around the Capitol complex”.[109]

Foreign policy

In June 2021, Boebert was one of 49 House Republicans to vote to repeal the authorization of military force against Iraq.[110][111]

In July 2021, Boebert voted against the bipartisan ALLIES Act, which would increase by 8,000 the number of special immigrant visas for Afghan allies of the U.S. military during its invasion of Afghanistan, while also reducing some application requirements that caused long application backlogs; the bill passed the House 407–16.[112] In August 2021, after the Afghan government fell to the Taliban, Boebert tweeted: “The Taliban are the only people building back better”, reusing Biden’s “Build Back Better” slogan.[113][114]

In September 2021, Boebert was among 75 House Republicans to vote against the National Defense Authorization Act of 2022, which contains a provision that would require women to be drafted.[115][116]

Energy industry

Boebert has supported the energy industry.[73] In December 2020, she declared support for uranium extraction.[74] In February 2021, she proposed a bill to ban executive moratoriums on oil and gas leasing and permitting on certain federal land.[74]

Agriculture, forestry, and land issues

Boebert, who represents a primarily rural district, has introduced legislation in the House to keep the Bureau of Land Management headquarters in Grand Junction, Colorado.[117] She has also introduced a forest management bill, the Active Forest Management, Wildfire Prevention and Community Protection Act, which would attempt to prevent wildfires through several mitigation measures, such as removing trees killed by bark beetles, making it harder for groups to go to court to stop forest thinning, and requiring the United States Forest Service to harvest six billion board feet of lumber annually.[118][119]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Boebert is a gun-rights advocate and opposes expanding gun control regulations.[124] She opposes Colorado’s red flag law, which the Colorado General Assembly passed in 2019.[10][16]

Boebert opposes COVID-19 restrictions[26] and supports repealing the Affordable Care Act.[125] She opposes a single-payer healthcare system, saying it would put small businesses like hers out of business because of the prohibitive cost.[126] She also opposes abortion,[16] comprehensive sex education, and federal funding of Planned Parenthood.[16]

Boerbert opposes the Equality Act, saying it promotes “supremacy of gays”,[127][128] and writes on her campaign website that she is against “efforts to redefine marriage as anything other than the union of one man and one woman”.[129]

During her 2020 campaign, Boebert pledged that she would not support any federal budget that resulted in additional debt[33] and that she would support a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.[130] This commitment does not extend to tax rates.[131] She supports eliminating the U.S. Department of Education.[33] She opposes the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, which would elect the president by popular vote.[16]

Boebert supports an “all-of-above energy” policy, which refers to developing and using a combination of resources to meet energy demand. The resources would include nonrenewable resources (e.g., crude oil) and renewable resources (e.g., solar power).[132]

She opposes the Green New Deal, claiming that the plan would cost $93 trillion and lead to bankruptcy for the U.S.;[133] a figure disputed by Factcheck.org.[134]

Boebert supports the construction of a Mexico–United States border wall and opposes giving amnesty to undocumented immigrants residing in the United States.[33]

Personal life

Boebert and her husband Jayson live in Silt, Colorado.[135] Before they opened a restaurant, Jayson Boebert worked in oil and gas fields, a sector he still consults in.[7][136] They have four sons.[16] She became a born-again Christian in 2009.[17]

In 2015, Boebert was cited for misdemeanor disorderly conduct at a music festival for telling officers that their arrest of a couple of underage drinkers was unconstitutional because the teenagers had not received Miranda warnings. As she was being handcuffed, according to deputies’ reports, Boebert tried to twist away from police, saying that “she had friends at Fox News” and that the arrest would be “national news”. She twice failed to appear in court on the charge. The petty offense was dismissed because the Mesa County district attorney‘s office believed a jury would not convict her.[137]

In 2016, Boebert was cited for careless driving and operating an unsafe vehicle. On February 13, 2017, she was arrested and booked in Garfield County Jail for failure to appear in court on these charges. She pleaded guilty to the unsafe vehicle charge.[138][139]

Electoral history

2020 Colorado’s 3rd congressional district Republican primary[140]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanLauren Boebert58,67454.6
RepublicanScott Tipton (incumbent)48,79945.4
Total votes107,473 100%
2020 Colorado’s 3rd congressional district[141]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanLauren Boebert215,27951.27
DemocraticDiane Mitsch Bush190,69545.41
LibertarianJohn Keil9,8412.34
UnityCritter Milton4,1040.98
Total votes419,919 100.0

References

  1. ^ Broadwater, Luke; Rosenberg, Matthew (January 29, 2021). “Republican Ties to Extremist Groups Are Under Scrutiny”. The New York Times.
  2. ^ Silverii, Ian (April 18, 2021). “Silverii: Boebert’s crusade for Twitter “likes” and Newsmax appearances”. The Denver Post.
  3. ^ “Rep.-elect Lauren Boebert (R-Colo.-03)”. The Hill. November 30, 2020. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021.
  4. ^ Lofholm, Nancy (September 14, 2020). “How Lauren Boebert rose from unknown to a candidate for Congress to someone in Donald Trump’s orbit”. The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d Wingerter, Justin (July 27, 2020). “Lauren Boebert beat a Colorado congressman. Is she the next GOP star?”. Denver Post. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved July 27, 2020. The political novice is now the front-runner to win Nov. 3 over Democrat Diane Mitsch Bush in this Republican-leaning district.
  6. ^ Rice, Heidi (July 14, 2014). “Regional: Shooters in Rifle serves a big helping of Second Amendment”. Glenwood Springs Post Independent. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  7. ^ a b Kim, Caitlyn (July 1, 2020). “Who Is Lauren Boebert?”. Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  8. ^ Armijo, Patrick (September 15, 2020). “Lauren Boebert discusses, defends her past during Durango visit”. The Durango Herald. Archived from the original on September 30, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  9. ^ Ashby, Charles (September 21, 2020). “Boebert’s Democratic upbringing questioned”. Daily Sentinel. Archived from the original on October 4, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  10. ^ a b Roberts, Michael (January 14, 2020). “Lauren Boebert on Her Fully Loaded Campaign Against Scott Tipton”. Westword. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b “Just How Unqualified Is Lauren Boebert, Really?”. Colorado Pols. September 18, 2020. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020.
  12. ^ a b Vincent, Robyn (January 27, 2021). “Boebert Brandishes Bombast, Extremism In Representing Diverse Colorado District”. KUNC. Retrieved February 19, 2021.
  13. ^ a b Schultz, Marisa (November 25, 2020). “Colo. Rep.-elect Lauren Boebert plans Thanksgiving ‘funeral’ for dead turkey in defiance of local guidelines”. Fox News. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021.
  14. ^ Ashby, Charles (September 18, 2020). “Boebert’s Democratic Upbringing Questioned”. The Daily Sentinel. Retrieved February 19, 2021.
  15. ^ “How Lauren Boebert rose from unknown to a candidate for Congress to someone in Donald Trump’s orbit”. The Colorado Sun. September 14, 2020.
  16. ^ a b c d e f Turner, Nikki (January 3, 2020). “Shooters Grill owner enters US House race”. Rio Blanco Herald Times. Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  17. ^ a b Sauer, Rachel (August 10, 2014). “Burger with a side arm: Gun-packing service draws spotlight, more customers to Rifle restaurant”. Daily Sentinel. p. 1D. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ a b Kessler, Glenn (March 12, 2021). “Lauren Boebert’s tall tale about a man’s death that led her to pack heat”. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 20, 2021.
  19. ^ MacGuill, Dan (March 11, 2021). “Was a Man ‘Beaten to Death’ Outside Rep. Lauren Boebert’s Restaurant?”. Snopes. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
  20. ^ a b Ashby, Charles (September 21, 2020). “Boebert’s Democratic upbringing questioned”. The Daily Sentinel, Grand Junction, Colorado. Archived from the original on January 11, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  21. ^ Markay, Lachlan (July 8, 2020). “QAnon-Curious House Candidate Gave Her Customers Diarrhea”. The Daily Beast. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  22. ^ Rice, Heidi (March 12, 2015). “Shooters makes transition from guns to golf clubs”. Glenwood Springs Post Independent. Archived from the original on September 21, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  23. ^ “Affidavit of Transfer and Statement of Compliance”. Garfield County. December 1, 2016. Retrieved June 3, 2021.
  24. ^ “Rifle Rodeo 06/05/17 Outbreak Report”. Archived from the original on November 28, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  25. ^ Walters, Joanna (July 1, 2020). “Who is Lauren Boebert, the QAnon sympathizer who won a Republican primary?”. The Guardian. Archived from the original on August 13, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  26. ^ a b Corey, Calvin (May 13, 2020). I’m not going to wait on the government to tell me what to do.” Lauren Boebert says Shooter’s Grill in Rifle is open for business”. KKCO. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  27. ^ Sieg, Stina (May 14, 2020). “Shooters Grill In Rifle Defies Cease-And-Desist Order”. Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on June 16, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  28. ^ “Shooters Grill Moves Tables Outside To Serve Customers After Cease & Desist Order”. CBSN Denver. May 15, 2020. Archived from the original on July 21, 2020. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  29. ^ Tabachnik, Sam (May 16, 2020). “Shooters Grill in Rifle has food license suspended, owner says”. The Denver Post. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  30. ^ Stroud, John (May 27, 2020). “Court case against Shooters Grill dismissed, but license still suspended as county, owner negotiate reopening”. www.aspentimes.com. Archived from the original on July 9, 2020. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  31. ^ Maulbetsch, Erik (December 31, 2020). “Boebert: “Second Amendment Isn’t About Hunting, Except Hunting Tyrants, Maybe. Colorado Times Recorder. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  32. ^ “A fluke or the future? Boebert shakes up Colorado district”. KSAT.com. Associated Press. February 6, 2021. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  33. ^ a b c d Cummings, William. 5-term Rep. Tipton backed by Trump loses in Colorado primary, upset by businesswoman Lauren Boebert Archived July 16, 2020, at the Wayback Machine, Detroit Free Press, July 1, 2020.
  34. ^ a b c Oldham, Jennifer (September 13, 2020). “The Gun-Toting, Millennial Restaurant Owner Trying to Ride the Covid Backlash to Congress”. Politico. Archived from the original on January 12, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  35. ^ Sackariason, Carolyn (September 24, 2019). “Garfield County gun advocates take aim at Aspen’s proposed prohibition of deadly weapons in city buildings”. Glenwood Springs Post Independent. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  36. ^ Sackariason, Carolyn (October 23, 2019). “Aspen Council unanimously passes ordinance to ban guns in city buildings”. Glenwood Springs Post Independent. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  37. ^ Maulbetsch, Erik (December 9, 2020). “Colorado Legislators Joined Extremist Groups for a “We Will Not Comply” Rally Against Red Flag Law”. Colorado Times Recorder. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  38. ^ Hananoki, Eric (July 1, 2020). “GOP-backed QAnon congressional candidate Lauren Boebert rallied with far-right militia at Colorado gun event”. Media Matters for America. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  39. ^ Staeger, Steve (January 18, 2021). “New Colorado congresswoman has history of associating with militias”. KUSA.com. Retrieved March 8, 2021.
  40. ^ Broadwater, Luke; Rosenberg, Matthew (January 29, 2021). “Republican Ties to Extremist Groups Are Under Scrutiny”. The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2021.
  41. ^ Kim, Caitlyn (June 22, 2020). “Lauren Boebert Questions If Rep. Scott Tipton Is Trump Enough”. Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  42. ^ a b c Bowman, Bridget (July 1, 2020). “Lauren Boebert ran against AOC and the ‘squad,’ and beat Rep. Scott Tipton in the process”. Roll Call. Archived from the original on July 8, 2020.
  43. ^ Panetta, Grace (June 30, 2020). “GOP Congressman Scott Tipton was defeated by right-wing primary challenger Lauren Boebert in Colorado’s 3rd congressional district”. Business Insider. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  44. ^ Tackett, Megan (December 10, 2019). “Owner of Shooters Grill challenges Tipton in primary”. Aspen Daily News. Archived from the original on July 7, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  45. ^ a b Kim, Caitlyn (June 22, 2020). “Lauren Boebert Questions If Rep. Scott Tipton Is Trump Enough”. Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  46. ^ Ashby, Charles (January 7, 2020). “Republican candidate and owner of gun-toting grill accuses Tipton of supporting amnesty bill”. The Daily Sentinel. Archived from the original on July 10, 2020.
  47. ^ Armijo, Patrick (April 20, 2020). “Restaurant owner gets top line on Republican primary ballot”. Durango Herald. Archived from the original on May 17, 2020.
  48. ^ Luning, Earnest (August 6, 2020). “National GOP congressional group names Lauren Boebert to ‘Young Guns’ program”. Colorado Politics. Denver, Colorado: Clarity Media Corporation. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  49. ^ Kurtzleben, Danielle (July 1, 2020). “GOP Candidates Open To QAnon Conspiracy Theory Advance In Congressional Races”. NPR. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  50. ^ Walters, Joanna (July 1, 2020). “Who is Lauren Boebert, the QAnon sympathizer who won a Republican primary?”. The Guardian. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  51. ^ Peters, Cameron (July 3, 2020). “The QAnon supporters winning congressional primaries, explained”. Vox. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  52. ^ Hulse, Carl (June 30, 2020). “Lauren Boebert, Gun-Rights Activist, Upsets House G.O.P. Incumbent in Colorado”. The New York Times. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  53. ^ Kaplan, Alex (July 1, 2021). “Here are the QAnon supporters running for Congress in 2020”. Media Matters for America. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  54. ^ Dickson, E.J. (August 2, 2019). “The FBI Declared QAnon a Domestic Terrorism Threat — and Conspiracy Theorists Are Psyched”. Rolling Stone. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  55. ^ LaFrance, Adrienne (May 13, 2020). “The Prophecies of Q: American conspiracy theories are entering a dangerous new phase”. The Atlantic. Archived from the original on August 29, 2020. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  56. ^ Harsha, Keagan (July 7, 2020). “Colorado primary winner Lauren Boebert meets President Trump, distances herself from QAnon”. FOX31 Denver. Archived from the original on August 4, 2020. Retrieved July 26, 2020.
  57. ^ Anderson, Jim; Riccardi, Nicholas; Fram, Alan (July 2, 2020). “GOP candidate is latest linked to QAnon conspiracy theory”. Associated Press. New York City. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 29, 2020.
  58. ^ Cook, Jeffrey. “GOP candidate’s former campaign chief: Thank God for Proud Boys”. ABC News.
  59. ^ Bye, Gabrielle (February 25, 2021). “Boebert Appears to Embrace Aide Who Left Her Campaign After Thanking God for Proud Boys”. Colorado Times Recorder.
  60. ^ “June 30, 2020 Primary Election – Official Results”. Colorado Secretary of State.
  61. ^ a b LeBlanc, Paul (July 1, 2020). “Trump-backed five-term Republican lawmaker loses primary to challenger who praised QAnon conspiracy”. CNN. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  62. ^ Axelrod, Tal (June 30, 2020). “Colorado GOP Rep. Scott Tipton defeated in primary upset”. The Hill. Retrieved March 8, 2021.
  63. ^ “Colorado Rep. Scott Tipton ousted in primary by gun rights activist”. Roll Call. June 30, 2020. Retrieved March 8, 2021.
  64. ^ a b Webb, Dennis (July 12, 2020). “Around Boebert’s hometown, her victory greeted by GOP with joy, apprehension”. Grand Junction Daily Sentinel. Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  65. ^ Luning, Ernest (July 4, 2020). “Boebert rockets to fame — and controversy — in primary upset in Colorado congressional race”. Colorado Springs Gazette.
  66. ^ “Local political leaders react to a recent poll for CO District 3”. Westernslopenow. September 21, 2020. Archived from the original on September 22, 2020.
  67. ^ a b Paul, Jesse; Lofholm, Nancy (November 3, 2020). “Lauren Boebert beats Democrat Diane Mitsch Bush in Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District”. Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021.
  68. ^ Stabile, Angelica (November 9, 2020). “13 GOP women join the House, dominating congressional elections, making history”. FOX News. Archived from the original on November 22, 2020. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  69. ^ Robillard, Kevin (July 1, 2020). “A QAnon Supporter Just Beat A Republican Congressman in Colorado”. HuffPost. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  70. ^ Wingerter, Justin (February 2, 2021). “Rep. Lauren Boebert’s mileage reimbursement “raises red flags,” ethics experts say”. The Denver Post. Archived from the original on February 2, 2021. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
  71. ^ Kim, Caitlyn; Kenney, Andrew (February 7, 2021). “What We Know About Lauren Boebert’s Campaign Payments To Herself For Driving 38,000 Miles”. CPR News. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  72. ^ a b Kim, Caitlyn; Kenney, Andrew (February 24, 2021). “Rep. Lauren Boebert Subtracts 7,000 Miles From Her Campaign Claim, Saying She Spent Money At Hotels Instead”. CPR News. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  73. ^ a b c Riccardi, Nicholas (August 19, 2021). “Colorado’s Boebert discloses husband’s work for energy firm”. Associated Press. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  74. ^ a b c d Stanley-Becker, Isaac (August 19, 2021). “Boebert pushed to loosen drilling rules. She failed to disclose her husband’s income from energy consulting”. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 19, 2021. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  75. ^ Tabuchi, Hiroko (June 2, 2021). “Here Are America’s Top Methane Emitters. Some Will Surprise You”. The New York Times. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  76. ^ a b Sollenberger, Roger (August 23, 2021). “Lauren Boebert May Have Violated Financial Disclosure Laws”. The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on August 24, 2021. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  77. ^ a b c Schwartz, Brian (August 18, 2021). “Federal officials press GOP Rep. Lauren Boebert over apparent personal use of campaign funds”. CNBC. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  78. ^ Swanson, Rad (September 22, 2021). “Lauren Boebert paid rent and utilities with campaign funds, FEC filings show”. The Denver Post. Archived from the original on September 23, 2021. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  79. ^ a b Solender, Andrew (March 19, 2021). “14 House Republicans Vote Against Condemning Myanmar Military Coup”. Forbes. Retrieved March 26, 2021.
  80. ^ Diaz, Daniella; Wilson, Kristin (March 19, 2021). “14 House Republicans vote against a measure condemning military coup in Myanmar”. CNN. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  81. ^ Clark, Kyle (June 30, 2021). “Now-deleted tweet from Boebert suggests Delta variant isn’t real”. . Retrieved July 2, 2021.
  82. ^ Thalen, Mikael (July 1, 2021). Stupidity has a champion in Colorado’: Lauren Boebert posts, quickly deletes, tweet downplaying COVID Delta variant”. The Daily Dot. Retrieved July 2, 2021.
  83. ^ a b Flynn, Meagan (January 4, 2021). “In ad, lawmaker vows to carry her Glock around D.C. and on Hill”. The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  84. ^ “Republican Lauren Boebert vows to carry handgun to Congress”. BBC News. January 5, 2021. Archived from the original on January 5, 2021. Retrieved January 5, 2021.
  85. ^ Flynn, Meagan; Scherer, Michael (March 3, 2021). “Donors gave a House candidate more than $8 million. A single firm took nearly half of it”. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  86. ^ Brodsky, Rachel (January 12, 2021). “Congresswoman Lauren Boebert ‘was in stand-off on Capitol Hill after refusing bag search. The Independent. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  87. ^ Wingerter, Justin (January 12, 2021). “Lauren Boebert causes holdup at U.S. House security, refuses to turn over her bag”. Denver Post. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  88. ^ Rogers, Katie; Philipps, Dave (January 14, 2021). “A Republican Lawmaker for Whom the Spectacle Is the Point”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 14, 2021. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  89. ^ Silverii, Ian (January 17, 2021). “Silverii: U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert should resign or be expelled”. The Denver Post. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  90. ^ Edmondson, Catie; Broadwater, Luke (January 12, 2021). “Before Capitol Riot, Republican Lawmakers Fanned the Flames”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  91. ^ Wingerter, Justin (January 6, 2021). “Lauren Boebert and Joe Neguse debate Biden’s win on the House floor”. The Denver Post. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021.
  92. ^ “Rep. Boebert under scrutiny for tweets relaying ‘intel’ during Capitol attack”. January 11, 2021.
  93. ^ Hsu, Spencer (June 10, 2021). “Alleged supporters of right-wing Three Percenters group charged in new Jan. 6 Capitol riot conspiracy”. The Washington Post.
  94. ^ Wedell, Katie; Johnson, Kevin (March 24, 2021). “Oath Keeper planned with Proud Boys, Three Percenters before Capitol attack, prosecutors say”. USA Today.
  95. ^ Goodland, Marianne (January 7, 2021). “State and local Democrats, others, demand Reps. Boebert, Lamborn resign over Wednesday’s Washington, D.C. riot”. Colorado Politics. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021.
  96. ^ Goodland, Marianne (January 7, 2021). “Elected officials and others demand Reps. Boebert, Lamborn resign over Wednesday’s Washington, D.C. riot”. KUSA. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  97. ^ Graziosi, Graig (January 12, 2021). QAnon Congresswoman’ Lauren Boebert faces calls to resign after tweeting information about Nancy Pelosi during Capitol riot”. Independent. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  98. ^ Rogers, Katie (January 13, 2021). “A Republican Lawmaker for Whom the Spectacle Is the Point”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 14, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  99. ^ Edwards, David (January 11, 2021). “QAnon congresswoman who live-tweeted Nancy Pelosi’s location to rioters now facing calls for arrest”. Salon. Archived from the original on January 12, 2021. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  100. ^ Aedo, Zachary (January 13, 2021). “Rep. Lauren Boebert says Twitter account locked until Inauguration Day”. KRDO. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  101. ^ Canales, Katie (January 13, 2021). “Twitter says it has reversed its ‘incorrect’ decision to lock Rep. Lauren Boebert’s account”. Business Insider. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  102. ^ Markay, Lachlan (June 16, 2021). “Communications director for gun-toting congresswoman quits”. Axios. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  103. ^ Grayer, Annie; Wilson, Kristin (June 16, 2021). “21 Republicans vote no on bill to award Congressional Gold Medal for January 6 police officers”. CNN. Retrieved June 16, 2021.
  104. ^ Bash, Dana; Raju, Manu; Diaz, Daniella; Fox, Lauren; Warren, Michael (February 26, 2021). “More than a dozen Republicans tell House they can’t attend votes due to ‘public health emergency.’ They’re slated to be at CPAC”. CNN. Retrieved March 10, 2021.
  105. ^ Grayer, Annie; Diaz, Daniella (March 10, 2021). “First on CNN: Watchdog group requests investigation into 13 GOP lawmakers for misusing proxy voting”. CNN. Retrieved March 10, 2021.
  106. ^ Maulbetsch, Erik (March 19, 2021). “Promoting QAnon-linked Conspiracy, Boebert Says Resignations Will Soon Allow GOP to Control Congress”. Colorado Times Recorder. Retrieved March 20, 2021.
  107. ^ Bump, Philip (March 19, 2021). “The emerging far-right ‘no’ caucus in the House”. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 20, 2021. It’s also worth noting that the coup in Myanmar has been viewed with approval by adherents of the QAnon conspiracy theory, a movement to which both Greene and Boebert have been linked.
  108. ^ “Lauren Boebert Pushes Deranged Conspiracy About Dems, 2022”. March 19, 2021.
  109. ^ Maulbetsch, Erik (March 16, 2021). “Boebert: Dems Call Those Who Try To Petition Gov’t Insurrectionists”. Colorado Times Recorder. Retrieved March 20, 2021.
  110. ^ Shabad, Rebecca (June 17, 2021). “House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq War authorization”. NBC News.
  111. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 172”. clerk.house.gov. Washington, D.C.: U.S. House of Representatives. June 17, 2021.
  112. ^ Quarshie, Mabinty (August 17, 2021). “These 16 Republicans voted against speeding up visas for Afghans fleeing the Taliban”. USA Today. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  113. ^ Wilson, Sara (August 19, 2021). “Rep. Lauren Boebert defends tweet about Taliban takeover of Afghanistan”. The Pueblo Chieftain. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  114. ^ Dapcevich, Madison (August 20, 2021). “Did Boebert Praise Taliban for ‘Building Back Better’?”. Snopes. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  115. ^ “House passes sweeping defense policy bill”. September 23, 2021.
  116. ^ “H.R. 4350: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 — House Vote #293 — Sep 23, 2021”.
  117. ^ Webb, Dennis (March 23, 2021). “Boebert bill would keep BLM HQ in Grand Junction”. Grand Junction Daily Sentinel. Archived from the original on March 23, 2021. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  118. ^ Kim, Caitlyn (July 3, 2021). “Boebert Proposes Wildfire Prevention Bill That Draws On Ideas From Colleagues On Both Sides Of The Aisle”. Colorado Public Radio News. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  119. ^ Roeder, Kaela (July 10, 2021). “Boebert introduces bill to pay for logging, raise timber revenue”. The Journal. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  120. ^ a b “Lauren Boebert appointed to U.S. House Natural Resources, Budget committees”. Vail Daily. January 26, 2021. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  121. ^ “Committees and Caucuses | Representative Lauren Boebert”. boebert.house.gov. January 3, 2021. Retrieved February 28, 2021.
  122. ^ Keith, Tony (January 5, 2021). “Colorado’s newest congresswoman to co-chair 2nd Amendment Caucus in Congress”. KKTV. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  123. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  124. ^ “Lauren Boebert upsets 5-term congressman Scott Tipton in Colorado primary”. PBS NewsHour. July 1, 2020. Archived from the original on July 7, 2020. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  125. ^ Paul, Jesse (June 28, 2020). “Want to understand U.S. politics? Look at Colorado’s 3rd Congressional race”. The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on June 27, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  126. ^ Hayes, Emily (August 16, 2020). “Boebert rally in Cortez draws dozens concerned about individual liberty”. The Durango Herald. Durango, Colorado: Ballantine Communications, Inc. Archived from the original on August 16, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  127. ^ “Boebert’s stance on Equality Act raises concern among LGBTQ in her district”.
  128. ^ “Lauren Boebert criticised for calling Equality Act ‘supremacy of gays. March 4, 2021.
  129. ^ “Pro-Life and Family Values”. April 15, 2021.
  130. ^ Wiggins, Mike (August 5, 2020). “Boebert fires up Ouray County crowd”. Ouray County Plaindealer. Archived from the original on September 15, 2020. Retrieved August 6, 2020.
  131. ^ “Lauren Boebert”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
  132. ^ Kim, Cailyn (August 24, 2020). “The Race Is On: Colorado’s 3rd District Candidates Stump From Pickup Trucks And Through Computer Screens”. Colorado Public Radio News. Archived from the original on August 29, 2020.
  133. ^ Boebert, Lauren (July 24, 2020). “Rifle restaurateur Lauren Boebert ready for a showdown in 3rd Congressional District”. Complete Colorado – Page Two. Denver, Colorado. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  134. ^ McDonald, Jessica (March 14, 2019). “How Much Will the ‘Green New Deal’ Cost?”. FactCheck.org. Archived from the original on November 1, 2020. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  135. ^ Stroud, John (July 20, 2009). “Silt couple discovers that childbirth can be one wild ride”. Vail Daily. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  136. ^ “Colorado’s Boebert discloses husband’s work for energy firm”. AP NEWS. August 18, 2021. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  137. ^ Miller, Faith (August 13, 2020). “Report: Lauren Boebert warned arresting deputies she had ‘friends at Fox News. Colorado Newsline. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 4, 2021. The Mesa County district attorney’s office dismissed a class 1 petty offense charge against Boebert “in the interest of justice,” writing that there was “no reasonable likelihood of conviction should (the) case go to trial.
  138. ^ Wingerter, Justin (August 27, 2020). “Congressional candidate Lauren Boebert has a history of minor arrests, court no-shows”. The Denver Post. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  139. ^ Hulse, Carl (September 26, 2010). “In Colorado, Fiery Political Novice Aims for a Seat in the House”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 3, 2020. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  140. ^ “Colorado Election Results — Representative to the 117th United States Congress – District 3 – Republican Party”. Colorado Secretary of State. June 30, 2020. Archived from the original on July 9, 2020. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  141. ^ Kim, Cailyn (November 4, 2020). “Lauren Boebert Wins In Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District”. Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on November 5, 2020. Retrieved November 7, 2020.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Colorado’s 3rd congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
375th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Agriculture

I work tirelessly to protect the interests of our farmers and ranchers and ensure they are able to thrive off Colorado’s soil.

Back the Blue

Rural law enforcement officers serve as our courageous thin blue line, often without backup. They are the heroes that run towards danger while others run away.


Border Security

A government’s first responsibility is to protect its people.


More freedom, less government. I will work tirelessly to get our Nation back to its constitutional roots.

Defense and Veterans

Our men and women in uniform represent the best of America, so they deserve the best that America has to offer.


Draining the Swamp

I was elected to office because the American people are tired of the D.C. way. I brought my work boots because I am here to drain the swamp.


Economy and Jobs

Economic strength and job growth result from policies that build up Americans and provide them endless opportunities to succeed.

Education

As a mom raising four kids, I understand the needs of families across this country who are desperate to have their concerns about education heard.

Election Integrity

I will always stand for free and fair elections that are secure, lawful, and constitutional.


Energy and Natural Resources

Responsible land stewardship and freedom make up the foundation of rural Colorado, and I will work to protect our lands, waters, jobs, and natural resources from federal overreach.

Foreign Policy

President Trump’s America First policies worked and helped restore this Nation.


Health

As a resident of rural Colorado, I understand the unique challenges that our District faces accessing quality healthcare.


Infrastructure and Transportation

Colorado is the nation’s 8th largest state, extending nearly 300 miles from north to south and nearly 400 miles from east to west.


Pro-Life and Family Values

As a mother of four children, I believe that human life begins at conception, and I will always defend the right to life.


Second Amendment

When I was sworn into Congress, I pledged to support and defend the Constitution of the United States—including the Second Amendment.


Standing up for Local Communities

Living in rural Colorado, I understand the unique challenges that our communities face.


Taxes and Spending

Americans deserve to keep more of their hard-earned money without the government forcing them to pay into a system that has failed them.

Immigration

Border Security

A government’s first responsibility is to protect its people. President Trump put the American people first by building a wall on the southern border, and I support legislation that keeps construction efforts moving forward.

The Biden administration’s failure to enforce the rule of law created a humanitarian and national security crisis at the southern border. I oppose legislation that advances misguided policies that incentivize illegal immigration like amnesty and open borders. The U.S. is a nation of immigrants and a nation of laws, so I champion policies that will reform our broken immigration system and support immigrants who come here the legal way.

The reason that so many people desire to immigrate to the United States is because we are a nation of laws established upon a strong Constitution that protects the freedom of speech, the freedom of religion, and the freedom to build a life through hard work on a level playing field. Without the rule of law, Americans lose these freedoms we hold dear, and America would become just like the countries where so many immigrants have fled from violence and persecution.

We need to remove loopholes in our immigration laws that encourage people to come here illegally. These loopholes support an evil empire of human trafficking where nearly one-third of young women illegally traveling to our southern border are sexually assaulted and 70 percent of all illegal immigrants are victims of violence. I have seen firsthand the devastation that human trafficking causes, and we have a moral duty to completely secure the border and stop incentivizing human trafficking.

We need to build the wall, secure our border, enforce our immigration laws, and send a strong message that if you want to come to the U.S., you must do so legally. The crisis at the border needs real solutions, not amnesty or phony tree planting initiatives like the Biden administration has recommended, which is why I introduced the No Amnesty Act and the Secure the Southern Border Act to restore President Trump’s effective border security policies.

Our nation has always welcomed—and will continue to welcome—newcomers who embrace our values, assimilate into our society, pledge allegiance to our flag, and strive after the American dream. By supporting law and order in our immigration system, I am committed to ensuring that the dream continues.

Safety

Back the Blue

Rural law enforcement officers serve as our courageous thin blue line, often without backup. They are the heroes that run towards danger while others run away. The courageous men and women of law enforcement who work tirelessly every day to protect our communities have my full and unwavering support.

As Democrats defund the police, I’m working to ensure they have the resources and staff to protect our communities, accomplish their missions, and protect themselves. I will not let rural Colorado get left behind by career politicians in D.C. My MORE PILT Act will help ensure that rural law enforcement, search and rescue, and firefighting operations are supported by the federal lands they help protect.

The skyrocketing crime rate that plagues our great American cities is being fueled by the left’s calls to defund our brave law enforcement officers. Democrat-run Minneapolis, Seattle, New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Washington D.C. have all defunded the police, and the results speak for themselves, with shootings, homicides, and other violent crimes on the rise. Instead of fixing the cities they already control, Democrats are trying to turn the rest of the country into Chicago.

I will not stand for it. I will however stand firm with both feet planted in defense of our men and women in blue.

I will always back the blue. I reject the policies that deprive the American people of their safety and liberty. I reject the myth that police are racist. Now more than ever, they deserve our admiration and support. The people of rural Colorado want more good and effective policing, not less.

Agriculture

Colorado’s Third Congressional District is filled with hardworking farmers and ranchers that help feed the nation. Farms and ranches comprise 31.8 million acres in Colorado, many of which are in CO-03. Agriculture generates $40 billion annually for our state’s economy and supports more than 115,000 jobs. Colorado has the 2nd-highest milk production per dairy cow in America. Colorado is home to more than 275 breweries. Colorado is home to nearly 3 million head of cattle and more than 400,000 head of goats and sheep. Colorado is 5th in the U.S. in beef exports. I want to build on this progress and will continue to support Colorado’s agriculture industry however I can.

Farmers and ranchers know that property rights are the foundation of their livelihoods and the American dream. The Endangered Species Act and the Sage-Grouse were both weaponized by extremists and the Obama/Biden Administration to trample on private property rights. Unfortunately, our property and water rights are also under attack by the Biden administration’s 30 x 30 program, which aims to lock up 30% of our lands and waters in a massive federal land-grab. I introduced the 30 x 30 Termination Act to protect ranching, grazing and multiple-use and block this radical initiative. I will always stand up for private property rights and will oppose encroachments by the federal government.

One of the biggest issues always facing agriculture is water. In Colorado, water rights are paramount to our economy, our environment, and our way of life. I introduced the Western Water Security Act to protect private property rights, prevent federal water grabs, and help ensure an abundant supply of clean water for future generations. We suffer from drought on a constant basis, which is why I also support effective water storage and delivery projects that will supply clean water in dry times.

I cosponsored legislation to prevent the return of 2015 WOTUS rule, a land and water grab that sought to assert Clean Water Act and federal jurisdiction over areas with the slightest connection to water resources. Farmers, ranchers, and property owners will all suffer if the Biden administration attempts to reinstate WOTUS.

I submitted an appropriations request asking for language to be included in the appropriations bill that would provide a one-year delay on the implementation of Electronic Logging Devices for livestock haulers. I also support a full repeal of the Estate or “Death Tax.” Americans are taxed enough already on their earnings and holdings and there is no reason they should be taxed again when they try to leave their kids the family farm. When Colorado’s Governor attacked the meat industry, I stood with our ranchers and ag industry by supporting Meat In Day.

I will work tirelessly to protect the interests of our farmers and ranchers and ensure they are able to thrive off Colorado’s soil.

More on Agriculture

X
Ken BuckKen Buck – CO4

Current Position: US Representative for CO-04 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Ranking Member , Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee

Quote:
I continue to stand with the people of Hong Kong as Communist China continues its efforts to infiltrate and ultimately control their government, as well as their way of life.  Sept. 20, 2021

Featured Video:
Rep. Buck: Amazon may have improperly influenced the largest federal contract in history

Affordable housing in rural communities is central to preventing economic stagnation in less densely populated areas of the country, U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, R-Windsor, wrote Wednesday in a letter to President Joe Biden.

Housing supply in rural areas declined 44 percent year over year, a January 2021 study by Redfin found. The housing shortage drove prices up 16 percent and resulted in an average home sell a month sooner than the previous year, the report read.

“This is an extreme change with several causes, but it reflects a long-term trend of low housing stock and high demand,” Buck wrote to Biden. “The housing stock for all types of homes in rural areas lags far behind demand, and unlike many urban areas, rural areas struggle to attract developers willing to make the initial investment to get construction off the ground.”

The Biden Administration has recently announced a plan to expand the stock of affordable housing across the country, and Buck’s communication was intended to persuade an attention to rural America, where he says communities face economic stagnation not because of lack of workers but instead a lack of affordable housing inventory.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for CO-04 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Ranking Member , Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee

Quote:
I continue to stand with the people of Hong Kong as Communist China continues its efforts to infiltrate and ultimately control their government, as well as their way of life.  Sept. 20, 2021

Featured Video:
Rep. Buck: Amazon may have improperly influenced the largest federal contract in history

News

Affordable housing in rural communities is central to preventing economic stagnation in less densely populated areas of the country, U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, R-Windsor, wrote Wednesday in a letter to President Joe Biden.

Housing supply in rural areas declined 44 percent year over year, a January 2021 study by Redfin found. The housing shortage drove prices up 16 percent and resulted in an average home sell a month sooner than the previous year, the report read.

“This is an extreme change with several causes, but it reflects a long-term trend of low housing stock and high demand,” Buck wrote to Biden. “The housing stock for all types of homes in rural areas lags far behind demand, and unlike many urban areas, rural areas struggle to attract developers willing to make the initial investment to get construction off the ground.”

The Biden Administration has recently announced a plan to expand the stock of affordable housing across the country, and Buck’s communication was intended to persuade an attention to rural America, where he says communities face economic stagnation not because of lack of workers but instead a lack of affordable housing inventory.

Twitter

About

Ken Buck 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Ken Buck is a Republican from Windsor, representing Colorado’s 4th Congressional District. He was first elected to Congress on November 4, 2014, and is currently serving his fourth term in the United States House of Representatives.

Ken serves on the House Judiciary Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee.  He serves as the Ranking Member on the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law, and he also serves on the Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship. He also serves on the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, The Pacific, and Nonproliferation.

Ken Buck learned the value of hard work from his grandfather, who opened a shoe repair store in Greeley in the 1930s. One of three brothers, Ken worked his way through high school, college, and law school as a janitor, truck driver, furniture mover, and ranch hand.

After law school, Ken worked for Congressman Dick Cheney (R-WY) on the Iran-Contra Investigation and then became a prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice. In 1990, Ken joined the Colorado U.S. Attorney’s Office where he became the Chief of the Criminal Division.

In 2002, Ken joined Hensel Phelps Construction Co. in Greeley as a business executive.

Starting in 2004, Ken Buck was elected Weld County District Attorney three times. He led a staff of more than sixty people with a strong record of criminal prosecution and crime prevention. Under Ken’s leadership, the crime rate in Weld County dropped 50%, one of the best records in the country.

Ken is a Christian and a leader in his profession and community. Ken has volunteered and served on the boards of many important community groups. As District Attorney, Ken brought together community leaders to create the Juvenile Assessment Center. The Center has helped more than two thousand kids and their families get back on the right path in life.

Ken’s son Cody graduated from West Point and served in the U.S. Army. Ken’s daughter Kaitlin works as a business executive in Colorado.

Committees

Rep. Ken Buck (CO-04) serves on the House Judiciary Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee.  He serves as the Ranking Member on the House Judiciary Subcommittee of Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law.

Caucuses

  • Article I Caucus (founder)
  • Reformers Caucus (founder)
  • Taiwan Caucus
  • Western Caucus
  • Diabetes Caucus
  • Semiconductor Caucus
  • Sportsmen’s Caucus
  • Beef Caucus
  • Fertilizer Caucus
  • Internet Caucus
  • Singapore Caucus
  • Armenia Caucus
  • Friends of Denmark Caucus

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

Experience

Education

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Kenneth Robert Buck (born February 16, 1959) is an American lawyer and politician who represents Colorado’s 4th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives as a Republican. Since March 30, 2019, Buck has served as chair of the Colorado Republican Party, having replaced Jeff Hays.[4]

Formerly the District Attorney for Weld County, Colorado, Buck ran unsuccessfully for U.S. Senate in 2010, narrowly losing to Democrat Michael Bennet. In Congress, Buck has emerged as one of the foremost proponents of antitrust enforcement in the Republican Party.[5][6][7]

Early life and education

Buck was born in Ossining, New York in 1959.[8] He and his two brothers were encouraged by their parents, both New York lawyers, to attend Ivy League colleges.[9] Buck earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in politics from Princeton University in 1981 and completed a 75-page long senior thesis titled “Saudi Arabia: Caught Between a Rock and a Hard Place”.[10] Buck later said that the Princeton degree was “more important to [my father] than me”.[9]

At Princeton, Buck played four years of football on the Princeton Tigers football team, including one year as a defensive back/punter/kicker and three years as a punter, earning All-Ivy League honors as a punter his senior year.[11] After college Buck moved west and worked in Wyoming at the state legislative services office and received a Juris Doctor from the University of Wyoming College of Law in 1985. He was also an instructor at the University of Denver Law School and for the National Institute for Trial Advocacy in Colorado.

Career

U.S. Attorney’s Office

In 1986, he was hired by Congressman Dick Cheney to work on the Iran-Contra investigation. Following that assignment, he worked as a prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington D.C.[12]

In 1990 Buck joined the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Colorado where he became Chief of the Criminal Division. Buck was formally reprimanded and required to take ethics classes in 2001 for a meeting he had with defense attorneys about a felony case he thought should not be pursued.[9][13] Only one of the three men initially indicted on felony charges was convicted, for a misdemeanor offense.[13] Buck said he is “not proud” of the incident that effectively ended his career with the Justice Department,[13] but says he felt it was “unethical” to prosecute such a “weak” case against the three men.[14] One of the three men donated $700 to Buck’s 2010 Senate campaign.[13]

Weld County District Attorney

Buck was elected the District Attorney for Weld County, Colorado in 2004. When he suspected that Social Security numbers were being stolen by undocumented immigrants, he raided a tax service in Greeley, Colorado and seized more than 5,000 tax files. The American Civil Liberties Union sued Buck’s office for violating the privacy of the service’s clients and after an appeal to the Colorado Supreme Court, costing the county approximately $150,000, the raid was deemed unconstitutional.[9] Buck has said that his time enforcing laws for the Justice Department and Weld County stoked his desire to become a lawmaker himself.[9]

Rape case controversy

During the 2010 Senate race, The Colorado Independent ran an article entitled “Suspect in 2005 Buck rape case said he knew it was rape,”.[15] The article, about a case Buck refused to prosecute in 2006, included a complete transcript of a tape between the victim and her attacker, including the following dialogue:
Victim: “You do realize that … it’s rape.”
Suspect: “Yeah, I do.”
Victim: “Like in a number of different ways, because I didn’t want to do it and because I was intoxicated and because I was afraid.”
Suspect: “Yes I do. I know.”
The tape, which Greeley police had the victim record during their investigation, was available before Buck made his decision not to prosecute the woman’s admitted rapist.
According to a following article in the Independent, “Buck’s refusal to prosecute 2005 rape case reverberates in U.S. Senate race,”[16] the reporter provides a transcript of another tape of a conversation between the woman and Buck, in which “Buck appears to all but blame her for the rape and tells her that her case would never fly with a Weld County jury.”
“A jury could very well conclude that this is a case of buyer’s remorse,” Buck told the Greeley Tribune in 2006.[17]
“That comment made me feel horrible,” the victim told the Colorado Independent in 2010. “The offender admitted he did it, but Ken Buck said I was to blame. Had he (Buck) not attacked me, I might have let it go. But he put the blame on me, and I was furious. I still am furious, she said.
According to the Independent, “A man entered the alleged victim’s apartment and had sex with her while she was drunk, she says. As she passed in and out of consciousness, she says she told him “no” and tried to push him away. If he had been a stranger, the case may have played out differently, but he was a former lover, and she had invited him over.”
In the meeting that she recorded, Buck said, “It appears to me … that you invited him over to have sex with him,” and that he thought she might have wanted to file rape charges to retaliate against the man for some bad feeling left over from when they had been lovers more than a year earlier. According to the Independent, “Buck also comes off on this tape as being at least as concerned with the woman’s sexual history and alcohol consumption as he is with other facts of the case.” Drawing on Buck’s abortion stance, the Independent also pointed out that “The suspect in this case had claimed that the victim had at one point a year or so before this event become pregnant with his child and had an abortion, which she denies, saying she miscarried. The suspect’s claim, though, is in the police report, and Buck refers to it as a reason she may be motivated to file charges where he thinks none are warranted.”[18]

Attempted falsification of Colorado Assembly GOP primary

On May 6, 2020, The Denver Post published a recording of a conference call between Buck and local Republican party official Eli Bremer, who confirmed the authenticity of the recording.[19]

In the recording, Buck first asked Bremer if he understood “the order of the executive committee and the central committee” to put activist David Stiver “on the ballot” in the November 2020 election for the District 10 state senate seat. Stiver had not qualified for the November ballot because he only received 24% of votes from Republicans in the district, short of the 30% qualifying mark. Bremer replied: “Uh, yes, sir, I understand the central committee has adopted a resolution that requires me to sign a false affidavit to the state”. Buck continued: “And will you do so?” Bremer replied: “I will seek legal counsel as I am being asked to sign an affidavit that states Mr. Stiver received 30% of the vote. I need to seek legal counsel to find out if I am putting myself in jeopardy of a misdemeanor for doing that.” Buck lastly asked: “And you understand that it is the order of the central committee that you do so?”, to which Bremer acknowledged he understood, and reiterated he would seek legal advice.[19]

Buck told The Denver Post on May 6 that Colorado political party committees traditionally made such decisions. The primary between Stiver and his opponent had been “unfair” due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Colorado, claimed Buck. He further claimed that he was not asking Bremer “to commit fraud”, but asking “if he understood the decision of the central committee and if he was willing to follow the request of the Republican central committee”. Buck also claimed he had no “personal stake in the process”. Meanwhile, Bremer decried that the Republican Party he belonged to was “for the rule of law except when it applies to us”.[19]

2010 U.S. Senate campaign

Republican primary

Angered by what he later called the nation’s “lurch to the left,”[14] Buck announced his plans to run for U.S. Senator on April 28, 2009.[20] In his first run for state-wide office, Buck frequently referenced national issues in defining his goals as a U.S. senator. Among these were his opposition to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the Troubled Asset Relief Program (a program of federal economic stimulus initiated under President George W. Bush and finalized under President Barack Obama) and the role of federal policy czars.[14] Buck also stressed mounting governmental debt, an issue to which he was to frequently return throughout the primary campaign.[14] Buck, contrasting himself to what he argued was the “top down” style of early Republican favorite Lieutenant Governor Jane Norton, also pledged a “bottom-up” campaign that would include visits to each of Colorado’s 64 counties.[14]

Initially Norton was seen to have had a nearly insurmountable advantage against “a band of underfunded unknowns” that included Buck, who early in the primary season was called “a dead-in-the-water Republican U.S. Senate candidate with laughable fundraising totals and little establishment GOP support”. Norton’s staff at the beginning of the campaign was twice the size of Buck’s. He attempted to make a virtue of his meager war chest by positioning “himself as the small-money underdog” in an election cycle that saw a “populist push for outsider candidates to upset the Washington establishment”.[21]

After receiving nearly $600,000 in a television advertising support from Americans for Job Security and a victory in March at the state party’s caucuses, Buck began to receive endorsements and notice. By late spring of 2010, Colorado had highly competitive Republican and Democratic primaries.[21]

Although Buck positioned himself as the candidate for the Tea Party movement during the Republican primary,[22] he stirred controversy at times with remarks critical of former Rep. Tom Tancredo, a Tea Party favorite, and the statement “Will you tell those dumbasses at the Tea Party to stop asking questions about birth certificates while I’m on the camera?” – a reference to those suspicious of President Barack Obama’s place of birth. Buck blamed the comments on his exhaustion and frustration after months of campaigning, and on his exasperation that it was difficult to keep campaign debate focused on the issue of mounting governmental debt.[23] Tea Party leader Lu Busse criticized Buck’s “choice of words” and inclination to treat all Tea Party adherents as a uniform group.[24]

Buck again stirred controversy by suggesting voters should cast their votes for him over Norton because, unlike his female competitor, “I do not wear high heels.”[25][26] Buck later stated that he was responding to Norton’s television ad claiming he was not “man enough” to attack her himself.[27]
(According to mass email, sent on behalf of Senator Jim DeMint, it was a joking paraphrase of his opponent’s suggestion to vote for her, “because I wear high heels”).

Making reference to Buck’s mandatory ethics classes, Norton argued that she “didn’t need an ethics class to know what’s right. … Ken broke the rules, and the facts speak for themselves.”[28] After Buck’s former supervisor, then-U.S. Attorney John Suthers, endorsed Norton, the Colorado Democratic Party Chair called for Buck’s resignation from his Weld County post because of his “career bypassing justice and ethics to reward political allies and campaign contributors”.[28]

On August 10, Buck defeated Norton in the Republican primary election by a 52% to 48% margin,[29] the end of “a bitterly contested primary that saw him go from an obscure and cash-starved underdog to a gaffe-prone mascot for anti-establishment conservatives [in Colorado] and nationally.”[30]

Senate general election

In the November 2010 general election, Buck was defeated by appointed Senator Michael Bennet, a Democrat by a margin of 48.1% to 46.4%.[31][32]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2014

On August 19, 2013, Buck emailed supporters and announced that the lymphoma he had been diagnosed with was in remission following treatment and he would run against Senator Mark Udall in 2014. He had already filed to run on August 7, 2013, before he sent out the email.[33] In March 2014, Buck withdrew from the race following the entrance of Rep. Cory Gardner, and decided instead to run for Gardner’s seat in Colorado’s 4th congressional district.[34]

Buck won the Republican primary, defeating three other candidates with 44% of the vote.[35] He proceeded to win the general election, defeating Democratic nominee Vic Meyers with 65% of the vote.[36]

2016

Buck ran for reelection to a second term in 2016, running unopposed in the Republican primary.[37] He then defeated Democratic nominee Bob Seay during the general election with 63.5% of the vote.[38]

2018

Buck ran for reelection to a third term in 2018, running unopposed in the Republican primary.[39] He then defeated Democratic nominee Karen McCormick during the general election with 60.6% of the vote.[40]

2020

Buck ran for reelection to a fourth term in 2020, running unopposed in the Republican primary.[41] He then defeated Democratic nominee Ike McCorkle during the general election with 60.1% of the vote.[42]

Tenure

Taxation

Buck voted in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[43] Buck believes the bill is “fairer for American families” and that it will “keep more jobs in America.”[44]

Pandemic response

On March 4, 2020, Buck was one of only two Representatives to vote against an $8.3 billion emergency aid package meant to help the United States respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.[45][46][47] Buck subsequently voted against the March 14, 2020 Coronavirus Relief Bill that passed the House by a vote of 363–40.[48]

While vaccines were approved for use to prevent the coronavirus and being distributed, Buck told Fox News he would refuse inoculation, saying. “I will not be taking the vaccine.” “I’m an American. I have the freedom to decide if I’m going to take a vaccine or not and in this case I am not going to take the vaccine. I’m more concerned about the safety of the vaccine than I am the side effects of the disease.”[49]

2020 election dispute

In December 2020, Buck signed onto the lawsuit seeking to overturn the result of the 2020 election.[50]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Ken Buck speaking at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland.

2020 presidential election

In December 2020, Buck was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives who signed an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden prevailed[55] over incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of the election held by another state.[56][57][58]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of “election subversion.” Additionally, Pelosi reprimanded Buck and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”[59][60] New Jersey Representative Bill Pascrell, citing section three of the 14th Amendment, called for Pelosi to not seat Buck and the other Republicans who signed the brief supporting the suit. Pascrell argued that “the text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems like a pretty clear example of that.”[61]

Buck later became one of a group of seven Republicans who did not support their colleagues’ efforts to challenge the results of the election on January 6, 2021. These seven signed a letter that, whilst giving credence to election fraud allegations made by Trump, said Congress did not have the authority to influence the election’s outcome.[62]

Abortion

Buck opposes abortion, including in cases of rape and incest, but makes exceptions if the mother’s life is in danger.[63]

Antitrust

Buck favors bipartisan legislation designed to bolster the federal government’s ability to bring antitrust cases against “Big Tech” companies.[5][6][7]

Education

Buck supports a revamp of the Department of Education and questions the department’s constitutionality.[64]

Environment

Buck rejects scientific consensus on climate change. In an October 2010 meeting with supporters in Fort Collins, Colorado, Buck endorsed the views of Senator James Inhofe, saying, “Sen. Inhofe was the first person to stand up and say this global warming is the greatest hoax that has been perpetrated. The evidence just keeps supporting his view, and more and more people’s view, of what’s going on.”[65] According to a Buck spokesman, “Ken believes there is global warming but thinks the evidence points to it being natural rather than man-made.”[66]

Foreign policy

In 2020, Buck voted against the National Defense Authorization Act of 2021 which would prevent the president from withdrawing soldiers from Afghanistan without congressional approval.[67]

In 2021, during a House vote on a measure condemning the Myanmar coup d’état that overwhelmingly passed, Buck was among fourteen Republican Representatives who voted against it, for reasons reported to be unclear.[68]

In June 2021, Buck was one of forty-nine House Republicans who voted in favor of the repeal of the AUMF against Iraq.[69][70]

Guns

Buck opposes gun control and is endorsed by Gun Owners of America. He stated that he would “oppose any federal legislation to compile a database of gun owners or to further proscribe Americans’ freedoms under the Second Amendment“.[71]

Healthcare

He opposes the health care reform laws that were enacted in 2010. He instead favors free market-based reforms.[64] His campaign website states, “We need to let the market work, make people responsible for their own insurance, and restore Americans’ freedom to decide for themselves whether and how much insurance to buy.”[72] He supported a state constitutional amendment that would give rights to unborn fetuses, but then later withdrew his support reportedly after he found out that the measure would have restricted certain fertility and contraception procedures.[73]

LGBT rights

Buck supports the U.S. military’s “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. He said, “I do not support the repeal of don’t ask don’t tell. I think it is a policy that makes a lot of sense.”[74] Buck believes that being gay is a choice. He said, “I think birth has an influence over it, like alcoholism … but I think that basically you have a choice.”[75] The Log Cabin Republicans have rebuked him for this comment.[76]

Net neutrality

Buck signed his support for Ajit Pai’s motion to abolish Net-Neutrality, alongside 106 other Republican representatives. When asked about Pai’s work to unravel net neutrality rules, Buck said: “I support Chairman Pai’s efforts to free internet providers from burdensome regulations that stifle innovation and increase costs for Coloradans.”[77]

National security

During debate over the USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020, Mr. Buck offered an amendment to the title of the bill so as to read: “A bill to be known as the Federal Initiative to Spy on Americans (FISA) Act.” With only 35 votes in favor, the amendment was not adopted.[78]

Veterans health

Buck proposed privatizing Veterans Administration hospitals so they would “be better run”.[79] Three months later, Buck changed positions and his campaign said, “… while Buck does indeed believe that private sector providers might do a better job than the VA in delivering health care to veterans, he is not in favor of fully privatizing health care for veterans.”[80]

Personal life

Both of Buck’s marriages ended in divorce. Buck has two children from his first marriage. Son Cody (born 1988) is a 2011 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York. In 2017, Buck authored the book Drain the Swamp: How Washington Corruption is Worse Than You Think.[81][82] Buck and his second wife, Perry, announced their divorce on November 9, 2018, three days after the midterm election.[83]

References

  1. ^ “Buck elected Weld district attorney | GreeleyTribune.com”. Greeley Tribune. August 11, 2004.
  2. ^ Moylan, Joe (December 21, 2014). “Michael Rourke wins Weld DA appointment | GreeleyTribune.com”. Greeley Tribune.
  3. ^ Silvy, Tyler (November 9, 2018). “Ken, Perry Buck to divorce | GreeleyTribune.com”. Greeley Tribune.
  4. ^ Politics, Ernest Luning Colorado. “U.S. Rep. Ken Buck elected to lead Colorado Republicans for next two years”. Colorado Springs Gazette.
  5. ^ a b Kelly, Makena (2021-07-06). “Rep. Ken Buck is the new face of Republican antitrust”. The Verge. Retrieved 2021-09-26.
  6. ^ a b “Analysis | The Technology 202: Rep. Ken Buck is trying to convince the GOP to hold tech companies accountable”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2021-09-26.
  7. ^ a b “Ken Buck is staring down Big Tech companies. And powerful people in his political party”. The Denver Post. 2021-06-27. Retrieved 2021-09-26.
  8. ^ “How Old Is Ken Buck?”. Politics Daily. 2010-10-04. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e Allison Sherry “Ken Buck’s family background helps him stand strong on principles” July 29, 2010, Denver Post
  10. ^ Owiny, Eunice (2014), “Caught between a rock and a hard place”, Crises, Conflict and Disability, Routledge, pp. 202–209, doi:10.4324/9780203069943-24, ISBN 978-0-203-06994-3
  11. ^ “All Ivy Tigers”. 2002-10-22. Archived from the original on 2002-10-22. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  12. ^ Allison Sherry (2010-09-26). “Bucks’ East Coast ambition meets West allure”. Denver Post. Retrieved 2010-10-30.
  13. ^ a b c d Allison Sherry “Belittled case drew Senate candidate Buck a rebuke from boss” June 24, 2010, The Denver Post
  14. ^ a b c d e “A conversation with Ken Buck”. The Denver Post. July 18, 2010.
  15. ^ “Suspect in troubling ’05 Buck case said he knew it was rape”. The Colorado Independent. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  16. ^ “Buck’s refusal to prosecute 2005 rape case reverberates in U.S. Senate race”. The Colorado Independent. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  17. ^ Waddingham, Rebecca (8 July 2008). “Woman Angry that Her Sex Assault Case Won’t be Prosecuted”. Archived from the original on October 15, 2010. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  18. ^ “Rape case catches up with Ken Buck – Salon.com”. Salon. 2010-10-12. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  19. ^ a b c “Colorado GOP Chair Ken Buck pressured local official to submit incorrect election results”. The Denver Post. May 7, 2020. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020.
  20. ^ Federal Election Commission filing; Ken Buck for U.S. Senate, The Colorado Statesman, May 1, 2010
  21. ^ a b Sherry, Allison (15 April 2010). “Long-shot Senate candidate Buck hits bull’s-eye in Colo. – The Denver Post”. The Denver Post. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  22. ^ Sherry, Allison (July 26, 2010). “Senate hopeful Buck regrets criticism of Tea Party birthers”. Denver Post.
  23. ^ “Long-shot Senate candidate Buck hits bull’s-eye in Colo. – The Denver Post”. April 17, 2010. Archived from the original on 2010-04-17.
  24. ^ “Senate hopeful Buck regrets criticism of Tea Party birthers – The Denver Post”. July 29, 2010. Archived from the original on 2010-07-29.
  25. ^ Lorber, Janie (2010-07-22). “In Colorado race, a focus on footwear”. The Caucus (blog). The New York Times. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  26. ^ “Jane Norton ad takes on Ken Buck over ‘high heels’ comment”. denverpost.com. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  27. ^ “GOP Rivals Jane Norton, Ken Buck Fight Over “High Heels” and Manhood”. cbsnews.com. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  28. ^ a b “Colorado Democrats and GOP Senate hopeful Jane Norton scold Ken Buck”. The Spot (blog). The Denver Post. 2010-06-24. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  29. ^ Buck defeats Norton in bruising GOP primary for Senate seat, Allison Sherry, The Denver Post, August 11, 2010
  30. ^ “Can he Buck the system?”. politico.com. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  31. ^ “Colorado – Election Results 2010 – The New York Times”. nytimes.com. Retrieved August 3, 2016.
  32. ^ “Results” (PDF). www.sos.state.co.us. 2010. Retrieved 2020-05-09.
  33. ^ Davis, Susan (8 August 2013). “Ken Buck enters Colo. Senate race”. USA Today. Retrieved 20 August 2013.
  34. ^ “Ken Buck Drops Senate Bid to Run for Cory Gardner’s Seat”. Roll Call. February 26, 2014. Retrieved December 25, 2014.
  35. ^ “Official Colorado Secretary of State Results”. Retrieved 25 December 2014.
  36. ^ “Official Results November 4, 2014 General Election”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved December 25, 2014.
  37. ^ “June 28, 2016 Primary Election Official Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  38. ^ “Official Results November 8, 2016 General Election”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  39. ^ “2018 Colorado Republican primary election results”. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  40. ^ “2018 Colorado general election results”. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  41. ^ “June 30, 2020 Primary Election – Official Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  42. ^ “2020 General Election – Official Compiled Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  43. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (19 December 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  44. ^ Matthews, Mark K. (20 December 2017). “How Colorado lawmakers voted on the federal tax overhaul — and why”. The Denver Post. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  45. ^ Cochrane, Emily (March 4, 2020). “House Passes $8.3 Billion Emergency Coronavirus Response Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  46. ^ Shutt, Jennifer (March 4, 2020). “House OKs $8.3 billion coronavirus aid package with little debate”. Roll Call. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  47. ^ U.S. House passes $8.3B bill to battle coronavirus; Ken Buck casts 1 of 2 votes against it, Denver Post, Andrew Taylor (AP), March 4, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  48. ^ Lee, Jasmine (March 14, 2020). “How Every House Member Voted on the Coronavirus Relief Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved October 18, 2020.
  49. ^ GOP congressman says he will not take the Covid vaccine because he’s ‘an American’, The Independent, Danielle Zoellne, December 18, 2020. Retrieved December 19,2020.
  50. ^ “Colorado attorney general Phil Weiser, Rep. Ken Buck on opposite sides of Texas election lawsuit debate”. December 10, 2020.
  51. ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  52. ^ “What is the House Freedom Caucus, and who’s in it?”. Pew research center. 20 October 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  53. ^