Lauren BoebertLauren Boebert – CO3

Current Position: US Representative for CO-02 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
Vice-Chair, Congressional Western Caucus

Quote: 
Here are my thoughts on mask mandates politicians and bureaucrats are making for school children. If you agree, please join me at LaurenForFreedom.com.

Featured Video:
Rep. Boebert: “Democrats need to keep their dirty, filthy, corrupt, greedy hands off of our rights”

Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., called for the immediate removal of President Joe Biden and replacing him with “righteous men and women of God.”

The Colorado Republican spoke Saturday at a conference hosted by the right-wing Truth & Liberty Coalition at Charis Bible College, where she called for the impeachment of Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris as part of a conservative Christian revolution against democratically elected leaders, reported Right Wing Watch.

“When we see Biden address the nation and the world and show more contempt and aggravation and aggression towards unvaccinated Americans than he does terrorists, we have a problem,” Boebert said, “and that’s why I have articles of impeachment to impeach Joe Biden, Kamala Harris.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for CO-02 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
Vice-Chair, Congressional Western Caucus

Quote: 
Here are my thoughts on mask mandates politicians and bureaucrats are making for school children. If you agree, please join me at LaurenForFreedom.com.

Featured Video:
Rep. Boebert: “Democrats need to keep their dirty, filthy, corrupt, greedy hands off of our rights”

News

Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., called for the immediate removal of President Joe Biden and replacing him with “righteous men and women of God.”

The Colorado Republican spoke Saturday at a conference hosted by the right-wing Truth & Liberty Coalition at Charis Bible College, where she called for the impeachment of Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris as part of a conservative Christian revolution against democratically elected leaders, reported Right Wing Watch.

“When we see Biden address the nation and the world and show more contempt and aggravation and aggression towards unvaccinated Americans than he does terrorists, we have a problem,” Boebert said, “and that’s why I have articles of impeachment to impeach Joe Biden, Kamala Harris.”

Twitter

About

Lauren Boebert 1

Source: Government page

U.S. Congresswoman Lauren Boebert is serving her first term as the Representative for Colorado’s Third Congressional District. A citizen legislator, Congresswoman Boebert had never held public office prior to her 2020 Congressional victory.

She is the Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus, Vice-Chairman of the Congressional Western Caucus, an Ex-Officio Steering Member on the Republican Study Committee, and an active member of the House Freedom Caucus.

Congresswoman Boebert is 35 years old and is from Rifle, Colorado. She is the first woman, first mother, and youngest ever to represent Colorado’s Third District. She is the owner and operator of Shooters Grill, a Western-themed restaurant where staff open-carry.

Representative Boebert was raised in a Democrat household on welfare. Her senior year of high school, she earned an opportunity to serve as an assistant manager at her local McDonald’s. She made the difficult decision to drop out of school to help put food on her family’s table, realizing she could provide better for herself than the government ever could.

Congresswoman Boebert is active in her church and spent years as a volunteer, counseling and assisting at-risk women at the local jail with reentering society and becoming contributing members in their communities.

She has worked as a natural gas product technician, GIS technician, and pipeline integrity coordinator. Congresswoman Boebert is married to a natural gas drilling foreman who has worked his entire adult life in the oil and gas fields.

Congresswoman Boebert ran because Washington is broken and she was tired of career politicians failing to uphold their promises and serve the people they were supposed to represent.

Representative Boebert is a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, first gaining national notoriety when she confronted then-presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke and told him “hell no, you aren’t taking our guns”. When 21 Democrats petitioned Nancy Pelosi to stop Congresswoman Boebert from carrying on Capitol Hill, she led the charge to defeat this unconstitutional overreach and earned the support of 82 of her colleagues who joined her in fighting this gun grab.

America needs more bold, conservative, young, female leaders. Rep. Boebert will challenge the status quo and change Washington, not let Washington change her.

Congresswoman Boebert supports legislation that allows for more individual liberty, more freedom and less government intrusion into our daily lives. She will always defend the Constitution and protect our Republic.

Representative Boebert is a fiscal hawk, fighting to eliminate waste, fraud and abuse wherever she can. She is focused on policies that foster an environment for economic growth and job creation.

Congresswoman Boebert is working to secure the border, terminate amnesty policies and build the wall. She is focused on improving care for our nation’s veterans and ensuring our men and women in uniform have the resources necessary to safely accomplish their missions.

Congresswoman Boebert believes in empowering We the People. The priorities of the citizens living in Colorado’s Third Congressional District are her priorities.

Committees

Committee on Natural Resources, the Subcommittee on Indigenous Peoples of the United States, the Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife, and the Committee on the Budget.

Caucuses

Co-Chair of the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
House Freedom Caucus
Vice-Chairman of the Congressional Western Caucus
Ex-Officio Steering Member on the Republican Study Committee
Values Action Team

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV

Offices

1609 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-4761
503 N. Main
Suite 426

Pueblo, CO  81003

Phone: (719) 696-6970
743 Horizon Court
Suite 112

Grand Junction, CO  81506

Phone: (970) 208-0460
835 E. 2nd Ave.
Suite 204

Durango, CO  81301

Phone: (970) 317-6130

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Wikipedia, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Lauren Opal Boebert (/ˈbbərt/ BOH-bərt; née Roberts, December 15, 1986) is an American politician, businesswoman, and gun-rights activist. A member of the Republican Party, she has served as the U.S. Representative for Colorado’s 3rd congressional district since 2021.

Boebert owns Shooters Grill, a restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, where staff members are encouraged to openly carry firearms. She ran as a Republican for Colorado’s 3rd congressional district in 2020; Boebert defeated incumbent U.S. Representative Scott Tipton in the primary election and the Democratic nominee, former state Representative Diane Mitsch Bush, in the general election. She has close connections to militia groups such as the Oath Keepers and Three Percenters.[1][2]

Early life and business career

Boebert was born in Altamonte Springs, Florida, on December 15, 1986.[3][4] When she was 12, she and her family moved to the Montbello neighborhood of Denver and later to Aurora, Colorado, before settling in Rifle, Colorado, in 2003.[5][6]

Boebert has said that she “grew up in a Democratic home”[7] and that her mother received welfare in Denver.[8] By 2001, when Boebert was 14, her mother registered as a Republican.[9] Boebert credits her first job at 15 years old, at a McDonald’s restaurant, for changing her views about whether government assistance is necessary.[5][10]

Boebert dropped out of high school during her senior year (she would have graduated in 2004) because she had a child, and took a job as an assistant manager at a McDonald’s in Rifle.[11][12] She later got a job filing for a natural gas drilling company and then became a pipeliner, a member of a team that builds and maintains pipelines and pumping stations.[13] She obtained her GED in 2020, about a month before her first election primary.[11][14]

In 2015, Boebert was arrested in Mesa County for making a public disturbance at a music festival. In 2016, she pleaded guilty to an unsafe vehicle charge after rolling her car into a ditch late at night. In 2017, her restaurant was responsible for over 80 cases of food poisoning at the Garfield County Rodeo after serving food without a license.[15]

Small business ownership

Boebert at Shooters Grill

Boebert and her husband opened Shooters Grill in Rifle, west of Glenwood Springs, in 2013. Boebert claims she obtained a concealed carry permit after a man was “beat to death by another man’s hands … outside of [her] restaurant”, and began encouraging the restaurant’s servers to open carry firearms.[16][17][18] The claim about the man was false: in 2013, a man who had reportedly engaged in a fight blocks away ran to within about a block of Boebert’s restaurant and collapsed and died from a methamphetamine overdose.[18][19]

The Boeberts also owned the since-closed Smokehouse 1776 restaurant across the street from Shooters Grill.[20][21] In 2015, Boebert opened Putters restaurant on Rifle Creek Golf Course.[22] She sold it in December 2016.[23]

In 2017, 80 people who attended a Garfield County fair became ill from food poisoning after eating pork sliders from a temporary location set up by Shooters Grill and Smokehouse 1776. They did not have the required permits to operate the temporary location, and the Garfield County health department determined that the outbreak was caused by unsafe food handling at the event.[20][24][5]

According to The Guardian, “Boebert made a name for herself after loudly protesting against the Democratic state governor Jared Polis‘s orders to close businesses to fight the coronavirus pandemic.”[25] In mid-May 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, Boebert violated the state’s stay-at-home order by reopening Shooters Grill for dine-in service.[26] She received a cease and desist order from Garfield County but said she would not close her business.[27] The next day she moved tables outside, onto the sidewalk, and in parking spaces.[28] The following day, Garfield County suspended her food license.[29] By late May, with the state allowing restaurants to reopen at 50% capacity, the county dropped its temporary restraining order.[30]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

Boebert speaking at Turning Point USA‘s December 2020 Student Action Summit in Palm Beach, Florida[31]

Boebert with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis in 2021

In September 2019, Boebert made national headlines when she confronted Beto O’Rourke, a candidate in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, at an Aurora town hall meeting over his proposal for a buy-back program and a ban on assault-style rifles like AR-15s.[32][33][12][34] Later that month, she opposed a measure banning guns in city-owned buildings at a meeting of the Aspen City Council.[35][34] The ordinance passed unanimously a month later.[36]

Boebert was an organizer of the December 2019 “We Will Not Comply!” rally opposing Colorado’s red flag law that allows guns to be taken from people deemed a threat. The American Patriots Three Percent militia, affiliated with the Three Percenters, provided security, and members of the Proud Boys attended the rally.[37][38] On Twitter, Boebert has used rhetoric friendly to the Three Percenters and deleted a 2019 tweet in which she posed with members of the group after being asked about it. She tweeted “I am the militia” during her congressional campaign.[39][40]

In December 2019, Boebert announced her candidacy for Colorado’s 3rd congressional district of the United States House of Representatives in the 2020 elections, beginning with a challenge to five-term incumbent Scott Tipton in the Republican primary.[41] During her campaign, Boebert criticized Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and other members of “The Squad“, positioning herself as a conservative alternative to Ocasio-Cortez.[42][43][44] Seth Masket, a political science professor at the University of Denver, suggested that Boebert wanted to motivate Republican voters to participate in the primary during a slow election cycle by stirring up their anger at Ocasio-Cortez and others.[42]

Boebert criticized Tipton’s voting record, which she said did not reflect the 3rd district. Before the primary, President Donald Trump endorsed Tipton.[45] During the campaign, Boebert characterized Tipton as unsupportive of Trump.[42] She accused Tipton of supporting amnesty for undocumented immigrants by voting for H.R. 5038, the Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2019, saying that the act has a provision that leads to citizenship and also provides funding to undocumented farm workers for housing.[46] Boebert criticized Tipton’s efforts on funding for the Paycheck Protection Program, saying that he did not fight hard enough for more money for the program, which ran out of money within two weeks.[47] In her campaign against Tipton, Boebert raised just over $150,000 through the June 30 primary.[48]

In a May 2020 interview on SteelTruth, a QAnon-supporting web show, Boebert said she was “very familiar with” the conspiracy theory: “Everything I’ve heard of Q, I hope that this is real because it only means America is getting stronger and better.”[49][50][51][52][53] QAnon, which the FBI has classified as a domestic terrorism threat and which has been called a cult, is a far-right conspiracy network.[54][55] Six days after winning the June 2020 Republican primary, Boebert said of QAnon, “I’m not a follower. QAnon is a lot of things to different people. I was very vague in what I said before. I’m not into conspiracies. I’m into freedom and the Constitution of the United States of America. I’m not a follower.”[56][57]

In September 2019, Boebert aide and future campaign manager Sherrona Bishop published a video on her Facebook page in which she interviewed a self-proclaimed member of the white nationalist group Proud Boys, which Bishop called “pro-everything that makes America great”, adding “thank God for you guys and the Proud Boys”. Bishop left the Boebert campaign shortly after Boebert won the Republican nomination in June 2020. In October 2020, the Boebert campaign denied any connection to the Proud Boys and said Boebert did not share Bishop’s views.[58][59]

2020 primary election

On June 30, 2020, Boebert won the Republican nomination with 54.6% of the vote to Tipton’s 45.4%.[60] The result gained national attention and surprised political commentators. Both CNN and Politico called it a “stunning upset”;[34][61] The Hill made a similar statement.[62] Tipton conceded defeat on election night, and Trump congratulated Boebert in a tweet.[63] Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chair Cheri Bustos said in a statement that national Republicans should disavow Boebert for her support of QAnon.[61]

Boebert was the first primary challenger to defeat a sitting U.S. Representative in Colorado in 48 years, since Democratic Representative Wayne Aspinall lost to Alan Merson.[64][65] She pledged to join the Freedom Caucus upon taking office.[45]

2020 general election

Boebert faced Democratic former state representative Diane Mitsch Bush, a retired sociology professor from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, in the November general election. Boebert said that she believed Mitsch Bush’s “platform is more government control” and that Mitsch Bush had a “socialist agenda”.[64] In late July, Boebert was considered the front-runner.[5] A survey taken in September and paid for by Michael Bloomberg‘s Democratic-leaning House Majority PAC had Mitsch Bush ahead by one percentage point.[66] On November 3, Boebert defeated Mitsch Bush, 51.27% to 45.41%. Boebert raised $2.4 million and Mitsch Bush $4.2 million.[67] Republican groups spent more than $5 million. Democratic groups spent nearly $4 million.[67] Boebert focused her general election campaign on gun rights, energy, and the Constitution.[68][69]

Boebert reimbursed herself $22,259 for mileage costs in 2020 from her campaign’s finances, which legally would require her to have driven 38,712 miles (62,300 km). The Denver Post reported in early February 2021 that three ethics experts said that the high figure was suspicious. Boebert’s campaign attributed the figure to Boebert’s “aggressive travel schedule”, but members of her campaign did not provide evidence for the amount of travel.[70] CPR News calculated that it was plausible that Boebert had driven 30,000 miles based on her visits to 129 events.[71] Boebert said in a mid-February interview that she “drove tens of thousands of miles … I had to make those connections, and really, I underreported a lot of stuff.”[72] In late February 2021, Boebert’s campaign updated its campaign finance filing, reclassifying $3,053 claimed for mileage to “hotels”, and $867 claimed for mileage to Uber rides, thus claiming a mileage of around 30,000 miles.[72]

Despite campaign finance laws and ethics laws requiring Congressional candidates to reveal their immediate family’s income sources to show potential conflicts of interest, Boebert did not report her husband’s income in her 2020 filing, instead belatedly revealing it in August 2021,[73] the same day the Federal Election Commission sent her a letter investigating her campaign expenses.[74] The filing, while misnaming the company involved, stated that her husband Jayson earned $460,000 in 2019 and $478,000 in 2020 as a consultant for Terra Energy, one of Colorado’s largest natural gas producers and fourth nationwide in methane emissions.[73][75] The company told The Daily Beast that Jayson was a contracted shift worker for the company who was not paid directly but through another company, Boebert Consulting.[76] As of 2021, Colorado classified Boebert Consulting as a delinquent company due to the lack of filings or registered agent with the state.[74] Boebert oversees the energy industry via her position on the House Committee on Natural Resources.[76]

2022 campaign

In August 2021, the FEC investigated the apparent use of more than $6,000 of funds from Boebert’s 2022 reelection campaign for Boebert’s personal expenses.[77] The funds were used between May 2021 and June 2021 via four Venmo payments.[77] Boebert’s communications director said that these were indeed personal expenses, “billed to the campaign account in error”, and that the “reimbursement has already happened”.[77] In September 2021, Boebert submitted documents to the FEC declaring that the campaign money had been used to settle rental and utilities bills, and had since been reimbursed.[78]

Tenure

In March 2021, Boebert was one of 14 House Republicans, most of them members of the right-wing Freedom Caucus,[79] who voted against a measure condemning the Myanmar coup d’état that passed overwhelmingly.[80][79]

In June 2021, the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant was first detected in Colorado in Mesa County, in Boebert’s congressional district. As the variant spread to make up 50% of Mesa County’s COVID-19 cases, Boebert’s Twitter account posted: “The easiest way to make the Delta variant go away is to turn off CNN. And vote Republican.” The tweet was quickly deleted amid public criticism.[81][82]

Opposition to Capitol Hill firearms regulations

On January 1, 2021, Boebert asked House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy in a letter co-signed by more than 80 Republicans to uphold the 1967 law exempting members of Congress from a Capitol Hill ban on firearms, which allowed them to keep arms in their offices.[83]

Having said in November 2020 that she planned to carry a gun while working on Capitol Hill,[13][84] Boebert published a viral video advertisement on January 4, 2021, showing her placing a handgun in a hip holster and walking through Capitol Hill, near federal buildings and through alleys. Her spokesman later said that she had not been carrying a gun during the walk.[83] The video was made by the same consulting firm that produced the viral August 2020 campaign video for House candidate Kimberly Klacik.[85]

On January 5, Boebert refused a bag check after she set off the newly installed Capitol Hill metal detectors, and entered the Capitol. She did the same on January 6, refusing to stop for a wand check after she set off the metal detector. Boebert called the metal detectors “just another political stunt by Speaker Pelosi”.[86][87] A New York Times profile of Boebert characterized her actions as “a made-for-Twitter moment that delighted the far right” The article said that although she had only been in Congress for a few days, she has “already arranged several episodes that showcased her brand of far-right defiance as a conspiracy theorist” and that she “represents an incoming faction of the party for whom breaking the rules—and gaining notoriety for doing it—is exactly the point.”[88]

Role in storming of the Capitol

On January 5, the day before the storming of the United States Capitol, Boebert tweeted, “Remember these next 48 hours. These are some of the most important days in American history.”[89] On January 6, in the hours before the Capitol was attacked, Boebert tweeted, “Today is 1776,” a reference to the American Revolutionary War.[90] During the counting of the Electoral College votes, Boebert objected to counting Arizona‘s votes in a speech to the joint session of Congress. She said, “The members who stand here today and accept the results of this concentrated, coordinated, partisan effort by Democrats—where every fraudulent vote canceled out the vote of an honest American—have sided with the extremist left.”[91]

On the morning of January 6, Boebert said during a House floor speech, “Madam Speaker, I have constituents outside this building right now.”[92] Numerous members and associates of Three Percenters and similar far-right groups were subsequently indicted on conspiracy charges for involvement in the attack.[93][94]

Democratic politicians in Colorado accused Boebert and her colleague Doug Lamborn of “helping incite violence” during the storming of the Capitol.[95][96] While the Capitol was being stormed, Boebert posted information on Twitter about the police response and pinpointed the location of other members, including that Speaker Nancy Pelosi had left the chamber. She faced calls to resign for endangering members’ safety.[97][98][99] On January 13, 2021, Twitter blocked Boebert’s account until after January 20 because she had violated Twitter’s rules.[100] Hours later, Twitter unblocked Boebert’s account, saying its staff “took the incorrect enforcement action”.[101]

Boebert’s communications director resigned on January 16 in response to the events of January 6.[102]

In June 2021, Boebert was one of 21 House Republicans to vote against a resolution to give the Congressional Gold Medal to police officers who defended the U.S. Capitol.[103]

Conservative Political Action Conference attendance

In late February 2021, Boebert and a dozen other Republican House members skipped votes and enlisted others to vote for them, citing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, while actually attending the Conservative Political Action Conference, which was held at the same time as their absences.[104] In response, the Campaign for Accountability, an ethics watchdog group, filed a complaint with the House Committee on Ethics and requested an investigation into Boebert and the other lawmakers.[105]

Support for conspiracy theories

During a March 15, 2021, town hall in Montrose, Colorado, announced only to local Republicans who were asked to not disclose it publicly, Boebert was asked when Hillary Clinton and other former officials would be arrested, a recurring theme of the QAnon conspiracy theory. Boebert responded that she knew an individual involved with documents declassified by Trump during the closing days of his presidency, that the documents would reveal corruption and that “I believe we will see resignations begin to take place” that will allow Republicans to retake the House and Senate before 2022, echoing a theory promoted by The Epoch Times. Boebert added, “So anyone who tries and tells you that this is a fringe newspaper, don’t listen to them. I have very good sources that tell me this is very good information.”[106][107][108] She also appeared to defend the January 6 attackers on the Capitol, saying, “We already see in Washington, D.C. You can’t petition your government. You’re an insurrectionist if you do that!” She later claimed that her remarks were “in reference to the ongoing security measures in place around the Capitol complex”.[109]

Foreign policy

In June 2021, Boebert was one of 49 House Republicans to vote to repeal the authorization of military force against Iraq.[110][111]

In July 2021, Boebert voted against the bipartisan ALLIES Act, which would increase by 8,000 the number of special immigrant visas for Afghan allies of the U.S. military during its invasion of Afghanistan, while also reducing some application requirements that caused long application backlogs; the bill passed the House 407–16.[112] In August 2021, after the Afghan government fell to the Taliban, Boebert tweeted: “The Taliban are the only people building back better”, reusing Biden’s “Build Back Better” slogan.[113][114]

In September 2021, Boebert was among 75 House Republicans to vote against the National Defense Authorization Act of 2022, which contains a provision that would require women to be drafted.[115][116]

Energy industry

Boebert has supported the energy industry.[73] In December 2020, she declared support for uranium extraction.[74] In February 2021, she proposed a bill to ban executive moratoriums on oil and gas leasing and permitting on certain federal land.[74]

Agriculture, forestry, and land issues

Boebert, who represents a primarily rural district, has introduced legislation in the House to keep the Bureau of Land Management headquarters in Grand Junction, Colorado.[117] She has also introduced a forest management bill, the Active Forest Management, Wildfire Prevention and Community Protection Act, which would attempt to prevent wildfires through several mitigation measures, such as removing trees killed by bark beetles, making it harder for groups to go to court to stop forest thinning, and requiring the United States Forest Service to harvest six billion board feet of lumber annually.[118][119]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Boebert is a gun-rights advocate and opposes expanding gun control regulations.[124] She opposes Colorado’s red flag law, which the Colorado General Assembly passed in 2019.[10][16]

Boebert opposes COVID-19 restrictions[26] and supports repealing the Affordable Care Act.[125] She opposes a single-payer healthcare system, saying it would put small businesses like hers out of business because of the prohibitive cost.[126] She also opposes abortion,[16] comprehensive sex education, and federal funding of Planned Parenthood.[16]

Boerbert opposes the Equality Act, saying it promotes “supremacy of gays”,[127][128] and writes on her campaign website that she is against “efforts to redefine marriage as anything other than the union of one man and one woman”.[129]

During her 2020 campaign, Boebert pledged that she would not support any federal budget that resulted in additional debt[33] and that she would support a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.[130] This commitment does not extend to tax rates.[131] She supports eliminating the U.S. Department of Education.[33] She opposes the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, which would elect the president by popular vote.[16]

Boebert supports an “all-of-above energy” policy, which refers to developing and using a combination of resources to meet energy demand. The resources would include nonrenewable resources (e.g., crude oil) and renewable resources (e.g., solar power).[132]

She opposes the Green New Deal, claiming that the plan would cost $93 trillion and lead to bankruptcy for the U.S.;[133] a figure disputed by Factcheck.org.[134]

Boebert supports the construction of a Mexico–United States border wall and opposes giving amnesty to undocumented immigrants residing in the United States.[33]

Personal life

Boebert and her husband Jayson live in Silt, Colorado.[135] Before they opened a restaurant, Jayson Boebert worked in oil and gas fields, a sector he still consults in.[7][136] They have four sons.[16] She became a born-again Christian in 2009.[17]

In 2015, Boebert was cited for misdemeanor disorderly conduct at a music festival for telling officers that their arrest of a couple of underage drinkers was unconstitutional because the teenagers had not received Miranda warnings. As she was being handcuffed, according to deputies’ reports, Boebert tried to twist away from police, saying that “she had friends at Fox News” and that the arrest would be “national news”. She twice failed to appear in court on the charge. The petty offense was dismissed because the Mesa County district attorney‘s office believed a jury would not convict her.[137]

In 2016, Boebert was cited for careless driving and operating an unsafe vehicle. On February 13, 2017, she was arrested and booked in Garfield County Jail for failure to appear in court on these charges. She pleaded guilty to the unsafe vehicle charge.[138][139]

Electoral history

2020 Colorado’s 3rd congressional district Republican primary[140]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanLauren Boebert58,67454.6
RepublicanScott Tipton (incumbent)48,79945.4
Total votes107,473 100%
2020 Colorado’s 3rd congressional district[141]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanLauren Boebert215,27951.27
DemocraticDiane Mitsch Bush190,69545.41
LibertarianJohn Keil9,8412.34
UnityCritter Milton4,1040.98
Total votes419,919 100.0

References

  1. ^ Broadwater, Luke; Rosenberg, Matthew (January 29, 2021). “Republican Ties to Extremist Groups Are Under Scrutiny”. The New York Times.
  2. ^ Silverii, Ian (April 18, 2021). “Silverii: Boebert’s crusade for Twitter “likes” and Newsmax appearances”. The Denver Post.
  3. ^ “Rep.-elect Lauren Boebert (R-Colo.-03)”. The Hill. November 30, 2020. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021.
  4. ^ Lofholm, Nancy (September 14, 2020). “How Lauren Boebert rose from unknown to a candidate for Congress to someone in Donald Trump’s orbit”. The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d Wingerter, Justin (July 27, 2020). “Lauren Boebert beat a Colorado congressman. Is she the next GOP star?”. Denver Post. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved July 27, 2020. The political novice is now the front-runner to win Nov. 3 over Democrat Diane Mitsch Bush in this Republican-leaning district.
  6. ^ Rice, Heidi (July 14, 2014). “Regional: Shooters in Rifle serves a big helping of Second Amendment”. Glenwood Springs Post Independent. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  7. ^ a b Kim, Caitlyn (July 1, 2020). “Who Is Lauren Boebert?”. Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  8. ^ Armijo, Patrick (September 15, 2020). “Lauren Boebert discusses, defends her past during Durango visit”. The Durango Herald. Archived from the original on September 30, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  9. ^ Ashby, Charles (September 21, 2020). “Boebert’s Democratic upbringing questioned”. Daily Sentinel. Archived from the original on October 4, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  10. ^ a b Roberts, Michael (January 14, 2020). “Lauren Boebert on Her Fully Loaded Campaign Against Scott Tipton”. Westword. Archived from the original on July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b “Just How Unqualified Is Lauren Boebert, Really?”. Colorado Pols. September 18, 2020. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020.
  12. ^ a b Vincent, Robyn (January 27, 2021). “Boebert Brandishes Bombast, Extremism In Representing Diverse Colorado District”. KUNC. Retrieved February 19, 2021.
  13. ^ a b Schultz, Marisa (November 25, 2020). “Colo. Rep.-elect Lauren Boebert plans Thanksgiving ‘funeral’ for dead turkey in defiance of local guidelines”. Fox News. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021.
  14. ^ Ashby, Charles (September 18, 2020). “Boebert’s Democratic Upbringing Questioned”. The Daily Sentinel. Retrieved February 19, 2021.
  15. ^ “How Lauren Boebert rose from unknown to a candidate for Congress to someone in Donald Trump’s orbit”. The Colorado Sun. September 14, 2020.
  16. ^ a b c d e f Turner, Nikki (January 3, 2020). “Shooters Grill owner enters US House race”. Rio Blanco Herald Times. Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  17. ^ a b Sauer, Rachel (August 10, 2014). “Burger with a side arm: Gun-packing service draws spotlight, more customers to Rifle restaurant”. Daily Sentinel. p. 1D. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ a b Kessler, Glenn (March 12, 2021). “Lauren Boebert’s tall tale about a man’s death that led her to pack heat”. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 20, 2021.
  19. ^ MacGuill, Dan (March 11, 2021). “Was a Man ‘Beaten to Death’ Outside Rep. Lauren Boebert’s Restaurant?”. Snopes. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
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External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Colorado’s 3rd congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
375th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Agriculture

I work tirelessly to protect the interests of our farmers and ranchers and ensure they are able to thrive off Colorado’s soil.

Back the Blue

Rural law enforcement officers serve as our courageous thin blue line, often without backup. They are the heroes that run towards danger while others run away.


Border Security

A government’s first responsibility is to protect its people.


More freedom, less government. I will work tirelessly to get our Nation back to its constitutional roots.

Defense and Veterans

Our men and women in uniform represent the best of America, so they deserve the best that America has to offer.


Draining the Swamp

I was elected to office because the American people are tired of the D.C. way. I brought my work boots because I am here to drain the swamp.


Economy and Jobs

Economic strength and job growth result from policies that build up Americans and provide them endless opportunities to succeed.

Education

As a mom raising four kids, I understand the needs of families across this country who are desperate to have their concerns about education heard.

Election Integrity

I will always stand for free and fair elections that are secure, lawful, and constitutional.


Energy and Natural Resources

Responsible land stewardship and freedom make up the foundation of rural Colorado, and I will work to protect our lands, waters, jobs, and natural resources from federal overreach.

Foreign Policy

President Trump’s America First policies worked and helped restore this Nation.


Health

As a resident of rural Colorado, I understand the unique challenges that our District faces accessing quality healthcare.


Infrastructure and Transportation

Colorado is the nation’s 8th largest state, extending nearly 300 miles from north to south and nearly 400 miles from east to west.


Pro-Life and Family Values

As a mother of four children, I believe that human life begins at conception, and I will always defend the right to life.


Second Amendment

When I was sworn into Congress, I pledged to support and defend the Constitution of the United States—including the Second Amendment.


Standing up for Local Communities

Living in rural Colorado, I understand the unique challenges that our communities face.


Taxes and Spending

Americans deserve to keep more of their hard-earned money without the government forcing them to pay into a system that has failed them.

Immigration

Border Security

A government’s first responsibility is to protect its people. President Trump put the American people first by building a wall on the southern border, and I support legislation that keeps construction efforts moving forward.

The Biden administration’s failure to enforce the rule of law created a humanitarian and national security crisis at the southern border. I oppose legislation that advances misguided policies that incentivize illegal immigration like amnesty and open borders. The U.S. is a nation of immigrants and a nation of laws, so I champion policies that will reform our broken immigration system and support immigrants who come here the legal way.

The reason that so many people desire to immigrate to the United States is because we are a nation of laws established upon a strong Constitution that protects the freedom of speech, the freedom of religion, and the freedom to build a life through hard work on a level playing field. Without the rule of law, Americans lose these freedoms we hold dear, and America would become just like the countries where so many immigrants have fled from violence and persecution.

We need to remove loopholes in our immigration laws that encourage people to come here illegally. These loopholes support an evil empire of human trafficking where nearly one-third of young women illegally traveling to our southern border are sexually assaulted and 70 percent of all illegal immigrants are victims of violence. I have seen firsthand the devastation that human trafficking causes, and we have a moral duty to completely secure the border and stop incentivizing human trafficking.

We need to build the wall, secure our border, enforce our immigration laws, and send a strong message that if you want to come to the U.S., you must do so legally. The crisis at the border needs real solutions, not amnesty or phony tree planting initiatives like the Biden administration has recommended, which is why I introduced the No Amnesty Act and the Secure the Southern Border Act to restore President Trump’s effective border security policies.

Our nation has always welcomed—and will continue to welcome—newcomers who embrace our values, assimilate into our society, pledge allegiance to our flag, and strive after the American dream. By supporting law and order in our immigration system, I am committed to ensuring that the dream continues.

Safety

Back the Blue

Rural law enforcement officers serve as our courageous thin blue line, often without backup. They are the heroes that run towards danger while others run away. The courageous men and women of law enforcement who work tirelessly every day to protect our communities have my full and unwavering support.

As Democrats defund the police, I’m working to ensure they have the resources and staff to protect our communities, accomplish their missions, and protect themselves. I will not let rural Colorado get left behind by career politicians in D.C. My MORE PILT Act will help ensure that rural law enforcement, search and rescue, and firefighting operations are supported by the federal lands they help protect.

The skyrocketing crime rate that plagues our great American cities is being fueled by the left’s calls to defund our brave law enforcement officers. Democrat-run Minneapolis, Seattle, New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Washington D.C. have all defunded the police, and the results speak for themselves, with shootings, homicides, and other violent crimes on the rise. Instead of fixing the cities they already control, Democrats are trying to turn the rest of the country into Chicago.

I will not stand for it. I will however stand firm with both feet planted in defense of our men and women in blue.

I will always back the blue. I reject the policies that deprive the American people of their safety and liberty. I reject the myth that police are racist. Now more than ever, they deserve our admiration and support. The people of rural Colorado want more good and effective policing, not less.

Agriculture

Colorado’s Third Congressional District is filled with hardworking farmers and ranchers that help feed the nation. Farms and ranches comprise 31.8 million acres in Colorado, many of which are in CO-03. Agriculture generates $40 billion annually for our state’s economy and supports more than 115,000 jobs. Colorado has the 2nd-highest milk production per dairy cow in America. Colorado is home to more than 275 breweries. Colorado is home to nearly 3 million head of cattle and more than 400,000 head of goats and sheep. Colorado is 5th in the U.S. in beef exports. I want to build on this progress and will continue to support Colorado’s agriculture industry however I can.

Farmers and ranchers know that property rights are the foundation of their livelihoods and the American dream. The Endangered Species Act and the Sage-Grouse were both weaponized by extremists and the Obama/Biden Administration to trample on private property rights. Unfortunately, our property and water rights are also under attack by the Biden administration’s 30 x 30 program, which aims to lock up 30% of our lands and waters in a massive federal land-grab. I introduced the 30 x 30 Termination Act to protect ranching, grazing and multiple-use and block this radical initiative. I will always stand up for private property rights and will oppose encroachments by the federal government.

One of the biggest issues always facing agriculture is water. In Colorado, water rights are paramount to our economy, our environment, and our way of life. I introduced the Western Water Security Act to protect private property rights, prevent federal water grabs, and help ensure an abundant supply of clean water for future generations. We suffer from drought on a constant basis, which is why I also support effective water storage and delivery projects that will supply clean water in dry times.

I cosponsored legislation to prevent the return of 2015 WOTUS rule, a land and water grab that sought to assert Clean Water Act and federal jurisdiction over areas with the slightest connection to water resources. Farmers, ranchers, and property owners will all suffer if the Biden administration attempts to reinstate WOTUS.

I submitted an appropriations request asking for language to be included in the appropriations bill that would provide a one-year delay on the implementation of Electronic Logging Devices for livestock haulers. I also support a full repeal of the Estate or “Death Tax.” Americans are taxed enough already on their earnings and holdings and there is no reason they should be taxed again when they try to leave their kids the family farm. When Colorado’s Governor attacked the meat industry, I stood with our ranchers and ag industry by supporting Meat In Day.

I will work tirelessly to protect the interests of our farmers and ranchers and ensure they are able to thrive off Colorado’s soil.

More on Agriculture

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Ken BuckKen Buck – CO4

Current Position: US Representative for CO-04 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Ranking Member , Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee

Quote:
I continue to stand with the people of Hong Kong as Communist China continues its efforts to infiltrate and ultimately control their government, as well as their way of life.  Sept. 20, 2021

Featured Video:
Rep. Buck: Amazon may have improperly influenced the largest federal contract in history

Affordable housing in rural communities is central to preventing economic stagnation in less densely populated areas of the country, U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, R-Windsor, wrote Wednesday in a letter to President Joe Biden.

Housing supply in rural areas declined 44 percent year over year, a January 2021 study by Redfin found. The housing shortage drove prices up 16 percent and resulted in an average home sell a month sooner than the previous year, the report read.

“This is an extreme change with several causes, but it reflects a long-term trend of low housing stock and high demand,” Buck wrote to Biden. “The housing stock for all types of homes in rural areas lags far behind demand, and unlike many urban areas, rural areas struggle to attract developers willing to make the initial investment to get construction off the ground.”

The Biden Administration has recently announced a plan to expand the stock of affordable housing across the country, and Buck’s communication was intended to persuade an attention to rural America, where he says communities face economic stagnation not because of lack of workers but instead a lack of affordable housing inventory.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for CO-04 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Ranking Member , Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee

Quote:
I continue to stand with the people of Hong Kong as Communist China continues its efforts to infiltrate and ultimately control their government, as well as their way of life.  Sept. 20, 2021

Featured Video:
Rep. Buck: Amazon may have improperly influenced the largest federal contract in history

News

Affordable housing in rural communities is central to preventing economic stagnation in less densely populated areas of the country, U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, R-Windsor, wrote Wednesday in a letter to President Joe Biden.

Housing supply in rural areas declined 44 percent year over year, a January 2021 study by Redfin found. The housing shortage drove prices up 16 percent and resulted in an average home sell a month sooner than the previous year, the report read.

“This is an extreme change with several causes, but it reflects a long-term trend of low housing stock and high demand,” Buck wrote to Biden. “The housing stock for all types of homes in rural areas lags far behind demand, and unlike many urban areas, rural areas struggle to attract developers willing to make the initial investment to get construction off the ground.”

The Biden Administration has recently announced a plan to expand the stock of affordable housing across the country, and Buck’s communication was intended to persuade an attention to rural America, where he says communities face economic stagnation not because of lack of workers but instead a lack of affordable housing inventory.

Twitter

About

Ken Buck 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Ken Buck is a Republican from Windsor, representing Colorado’s 4th Congressional District. He was first elected to Congress on November 4, 2014, and is currently serving his fourth term in the United States House of Representatives.

Ken serves on the House Judiciary Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee.  He serves as the Ranking Member on the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law, and he also serves on the Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship. He also serves on the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, The Pacific, and Nonproliferation.

Ken Buck learned the value of hard work from his grandfather, who opened a shoe repair store in Greeley in the 1930s. One of three brothers, Ken worked his way through high school, college, and law school as a janitor, truck driver, furniture mover, and ranch hand.

After law school, Ken worked for Congressman Dick Cheney (R-WY) on the Iran-Contra Investigation and then became a prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice. In 1990, Ken joined the Colorado U.S. Attorney’s Office where he became the Chief of the Criminal Division.

In 2002, Ken joined Hensel Phelps Construction Co. in Greeley as a business executive.

Starting in 2004, Ken Buck was elected Weld County District Attorney three times. He led a staff of more than sixty people with a strong record of criminal prosecution and crime prevention. Under Ken’s leadership, the crime rate in Weld County dropped 50%, one of the best records in the country.

Ken is a Christian and a leader in his profession and community. Ken has volunteered and served on the boards of many important community groups. As District Attorney, Ken brought together community leaders to create the Juvenile Assessment Center. The Center has helped more than two thousand kids and their families get back on the right path in life.

Ken’s son Cody graduated from West Point and served in the U.S. Army. Ken’s daughter Kaitlin works as a business executive in Colorado.

Committees

Rep. Ken Buck (CO-04) serves on the House Judiciary Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee.  He serves as the Ranking Member on the House Judiciary Subcommittee of Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law.

Caucuses

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  • Taiwan Caucus
  • Western Caucus
  • Diabetes Caucus
  • Semiconductor Caucus
  • Sportsmen’s Caucus
  • Beef Caucus
  • Fertilizer Caucus
  • Internet Caucus
  • Singapore Caucus
  • Armenia Caucus
  • Friends of Denmark Caucus

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Wikipedia entry

Kenneth Robert Buck (born February 16, 1959) is an American lawyer and politician who represents Colorado’s 4th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives as a Republican. Since March 30, 2019, Buck has served as chair of the Colorado Republican Party, having replaced Jeff Hays.[4]

Formerly the District Attorney for Weld County, Colorado, Buck ran unsuccessfully for U.S. Senate in 2010, narrowly losing to Democrat Michael Bennet. In Congress, Buck has emerged as one of the foremost proponents of antitrust enforcement in the Republican Party.[5][6][7]

Early life and education

Buck was born in Ossining, New York in 1959.[8] He and his two brothers were encouraged by their parents, both New York lawyers, to attend Ivy League colleges.[9] Buck earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in politics from Princeton University in 1981 and completed a 75-page long senior thesis titled “Saudi Arabia: Caught Between a Rock and a Hard Place”.[10] Buck later said that the Princeton degree was “more important to [my father] than me”.[9]

At Princeton, Buck played four years of football on the Princeton Tigers football team, including one year as a defensive back/punter/kicker and three years as a punter, earning All-Ivy League honors as a punter his senior year.[11] After college Buck moved west and worked in Wyoming at the state legislative services office and received a Juris Doctor from the University of Wyoming College of Law in 1985. He was also an instructor at the University of Denver Law School and for the National Institute for Trial Advocacy in Colorado.

Career

U.S. Attorney’s Office

In 1986, he was hired by Congressman Dick Cheney to work on the Iran-Contra investigation. Following that assignment, he worked as a prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington D.C.[12]

In 1990 Buck joined the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Colorado where he became Chief of the Criminal Division. Buck was formally reprimanded and required to take ethics classes in 2001 for a meeting he had with defense attorneys about a felony case he thought should not be pursued.[9][13] Only one of the three men initially indicted on felony charges was convicted, for a misdemeanor offense.[13] Buck said he is “not proud” of the incident that effectively ended his career with the Justice Department,[13] but says he felt it was “unethical” to prosecute such a “weak” case against the three men.[14] One of the three men donated $700 to Buck’s 2010 Senate campaign.[13]

Weld County District Attorney

Buck was elected the District Attorney for Weld County, Colorado in 2004. When he suspected that Social Security numbers were being stolen by undocumented immigrants, he raided a tax service in Greeley, Colorado and seized more than 5,000 tax files. The American Civil Liberties Union sued Buck’s office for violating the privacy of the service’s clients and after an appeal to the Colorado Supreme Court, costing the county approximately $150,000, the raid was deemed unconstitutional.[9] Buck has said that his time enforcing laws for the Justice Department and Weld County stoked his desire to become a lawmaker himself.[9]

Rape case controversy

During the 2010 Senate race, The Colorado Independent ran an article entitled “Suspect in 2005 Buck rape case said he knew it was rape,”.[15] The article, about a case Buck refused to prosecute in 2006, included a complete transcript of a tape between the victim and her attacker, including the following dialogue:
Victim: “You do realize that … it’s rape.”
Suspect: “Yeah, I do.”
Victim: “Like in a number of different ways, because I didn’t want to do it and because I was intoxicated and because I was afraid.”
Suspect: “Yes I do. I know.”
The tape, which Greeley police had the victim record during their investigation, was available before Buck made his decision not to prosecute the woman’s admitted rapist.
According to a following article in the Independent, “Buck’s refusal to prosecute 2005 rape case reverberates in U.S. Senate race,”[16] the reporter provides a transcript of another tape of a conversation between the woman and Buck, in which “Buck appears to all but blame her for the rape and tells her that her case would never fly with a Weld County jury.”
“A jury could very well conclude that this is a case of buyer’s remorse,” Buck told the Greeley Tribune in 2006.[17]
“That comment made me feel horrible,” the victim told the Colorado Independent in 2010. “The offender admitted he did it, but Ken Buck said I was to blame. Had he (Buck) not attacked me, I might have let it go. But he put the blame on me, and I was furious. I still am furious, she said.
According to the Independent, “A man entered the alleged victim’s apartment and had sex with her while she was drunk, she says. As she passed in and out of consciousness, she says she told him “no” and tried to push him away. If he had been a stranger, the case may have played out differently, but he was a former lover, and she had invited him over.”
In the meeting that she recorded, Buck said, “It appears to me … that you invited him over to have sex with him,” and that he thought she might have wanted to file rape charges to retaliate against the man for some bad feeling left over from when they had been lovers more than a year earlier. According to the Independent, “Buck also comes off on this tape as being at least as concerned with the woman’s sexual history and alcohol consumption as he is with other facts of the case.” Drawing on Buck’s abortion stance, the Independent also pointed out that “The suspect in this case had claimed that the victim had at one point a year or so before this event become pregnant with his child and had an abortion, which she denies, saying she miscarried. The suspect’s claim, though, is in the police report, and Buck refers to it as a reason she may be motivated to file charges where he thinks none are warranted.”[18]

Attempted falsification of Colorado Assembly GOP primary

On May 6, 2020, The Denver Post published a recording of a conference call between Buck and local Republican party official Eli Bremer, who confirmed the authenticity of the recording.[19]

In the recording, Buck first asked Bremer if he understood “the order of the executive committee and the central committee” to put activist David Stiver “on the ballot” in the November 2020 election for the District 10 state senate seat. Stiver had not qualified for the November ballot because he only received 24% of votes from Republicans in the district, short of the 30% qualifying mark. Bremer replied: “Uh, yes, sir, I understand the central committee has adopted a resolution that requires me to sign a false affidavit to the state”. Buck continued: “And will you do so?” Bremer replied: “I will seek legal counsel as I am being asked to sign an affidavit that states Mr. Stiver received 30% of the vote. I need to seek legal counsel to find out if I am putting myself in jeopardy of a misdemeanor for doing that.” Buck lastly asked: “And you understand that it is the order of the central committee that you do so?”, to which Bremer acknowledged he understood, and reiterated he would seek legal advice.[19]

Buck told The Denver Post on May 6 that Colorado political party committees traditionally made such decisions. The primary between Stiver and his opponent had been “unfair” due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Colorado, claimed Buck. He further claimed that he was not asking Bremer “to commit fraud”, but asking “if he understood the decision of the central committee and if he was willing to follow the request of the Republican central committee”. Buck also claimed he had no “personal stake in the process”. Meanwhile, Bremer decried that the Republican Party he belonged to was “for the rule of law except when it applies to us”.[19]

2010 U.S. Senate campaign

Republican primary

Angered by what he later called the nation’s “lurch to the left,”[14] Buck announced his plans to run for U.S. Senator on April 28, 2009.[20] In his first run for state-wide office, Buck frequently referenced national issues in defining his goals as a U.S. senator. Among these were his opposition to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the Troubled Asset Relief Program (a program of federal economic stimulus initiated under President George W. Bush and finalized under President Barack Obama) and the role of federal policy czars.[14] Buck also stressed mounting governmental debt, an issue to which he was to frequently return throughout the primary campaign.[14] Buck, contrasting himself to what he argued was the “top down” style of early Republican favorite Lieutenant Governor Jane Norton, also pledged a “bottom-up” campaign that would include visits to each of Colorado’s 64 counties.[14]

Initially Norton was seen to have had a nearly insurmountable advantage against “a band of underfunded unknowns” that included Buck, who early in the primary season was called “a dead-in-the-water Republican U.S. Senate candidate with laughable fundraising totals and little establishment GOP support”. Norton’s staff at the beginning of the campaign was twice the size of Buck’s. He attempted to make a virtue of his meager war chest by positioning “himself as the small-money underdog” in an election cycle that saw a “populist push for outsider candidates to upset the Washington establishment”.[21]

After receiving nearly $600,000 in a television advertising support from Americans for Job Security and a victory in March at the state party’s caucuses, Buck began to receive endorsements and notice. By late spring of 2010, Colorado had highly competitive Republican and Democratic primaries.[21]

Although Buck positioned himself as the candidate for the Tea Party movement during the Republican primary,[22] he stirred controversy at times with remarks critical of former Rep. Tom Tancredo, a Tea Party favorite, and the statement “Will you tell those dumbasses at the Tea Party to stop asking questions about birth certificates while I’m on the camera?” – a reference to those suspicious of President Barack Obama’s place of birth. Buck blamed the comments on his exhaustion and frustration after months of campaigning, and on his exasperation that it was difficult to keep campaign debate focused on the issue of mounting governmental debt.[23] Tea Party leader Lu Busse criticized Buck’s “choice of words” and inclination to treat all Tea Party adherents as a uniform group.[24]

Buck again stirred controversy by suggesting voters should cast their votes for him over Norton because, unlike his female competitor, “I do not wear high heels.”[25][26] Buck later stated that he was responding to Norton’s television ad claiming he was not “man enough” to attack her himself.[27]
(According to mass email, sent on behalf of Senator Jim DeMint, it was a joking paraphrase of his opponent’s suggestion to vote for her, “because I wear high heels”).

Making reference to Buck’s mandatory ethics classes, Norton argued that she “didn’t need an ethics class to know what’s right. … Ken broke the rules, and the facts speak for themselves.”[28] After Buck’s former supervisor, then-U.S. Attorney John Suthers, endorsed Norton, the Colorado Democratic Party Chair called for Buck’s resignation from his Weld County post because of his “career bypassing justice and ethics to reward political allies and campaign contributors”.[28]

On August 10, Buck defeated Norton in the Republican primary election by a 52% to 48% margin,[29] the end of “a bitterly contested primary that saw him go from an obscure and cash-starved underdog to a gaffe-prone mascot for anti-establishment conservatives [in Colorado] and nationally.”[30]

Senate general election

In the November 2010 general election, Buck was defeated by appointed Senator Michael Bennet, a Democrat by a margin of 48.1% to 46.4%.[31][32]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2014

On August 19, 2013, Buck emailed supporters and announced that the lymphoma he had been diagnosed with was in remission following treatment and he would run against Senator Mark Udall in 2014. He had already filed to run on August 7, 2013, before he sent out the email.[33] In March 2014, Buck withdrew from the race following the entrance of Rep. Cory Gardner, and decided instead to run for Gardner’s seat in Colorado’s 4th congressional district.[34]

Buck won the Republican primary, defeating three other candidates with 44% of the vote.[35] He proceeded to win the general election, defeating Democratic nominee Vic Meyers with 65% of the vote.[36]

2016

Buck ran for reelection to a second term in 2016, running unopposed in the Republican primary.[37] He then defeated Democratic nominee Bob Seay during the general election with 63.5% of the vote.[38]

2018

Buck ran for reelection to a third term in 2018, running unopposed in the Republican primary.[39] He then defeated Democratic nominee Karen McCormick during the general election with 60.6% of the vote.[40]

2020

Buck ran for reelection to a fourth term in 2020, running unopposed in the Republican primary.[41] He then defeated Democratic nominee Ike McCorkle during the general election with 60.1% of the vote.[42]

Tenure

Taxation

Buck voted in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[43] Buck believes the bill is “fairer for American families” and that it will “keep more jobs in America.”[44]

Pandemic response

On March 4, 2020, Buck was one of only two Representatives to vote against an $8.3 billion emergency aid package meant to help the United States respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.[45][46][47] Buck subsequently voted against the March 14, 2020 Coronavirus Relief Bill that passed the House by a vote of 363–40.[48]

While vaccines were approved for use to prevent the coronavirus and being distributed, Buck told Fox News he would refuse inoculation, saying. “I will not be taking the vaccine.” “I’m an American. I have the freedom to decide if I’m going to take a vaccine or not and in this case I am not going to take the vaccine. I’m more concerned about the safety of the vaccine than I am the side effects of the disease.”[49]

2020 election dispute

In December 2020, Buck signed onto the lawsuit seeking to overturn the result of the 2020 election.[50]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Ken Buck speaking at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland.

2020 presidential election

In December 2020, Buck was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives who signed an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden prevailed[55] over incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of the election held by another state.[56][57][58]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of “election subversion.” Additionally, Pelosi reprimanded Buck and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”[59][60] New Jersey Representative Bill Pascrell, citing section three of the 14th Amendment, called for Pelosi to not seat Buck and the other Republicans who signed the brief supporting the suit. Pascrell argued that “the text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems like a pretty clear example of that.”[61]

Buck later became one of a group of seven Republicans who did not support their colleagues’ efforts to challenge the results of the election on January 6, 2021. These seven signed a letter that, whilst giving credence to election fraud allegations made by Trump, said Congress did not have the authority to influence the election’s outcome.[62]

Abortion

Buck opposes abortion, including in cases of rape and incest, but makes exceptions if the mother’s life is in danger.[63]

Antitrust

Buck favors bipartisan legislation designed to bolster the federal government’s ability to bring antitrust cases against “Big Tech” companies.[5][6][7]

Education

Buck supports a revamp of the Department of Education and questions the department’s constitutionality.[64]

Environment

Buck rejects scientific consensus on climate change. In an October 2010 meeting with supporters in Fort Collins, Colorado, Buck endorsed the views of Senator James Inhofe, saying, “Sen. Inhofe was the first person to stand up and say this global warming is the greatest hoax that has been perpetrated. The evidence just keeps supporting his view, and more and more people’s view, of what’s going on.”[65] According to a Buck spokesman, “Ken believes there is global warming but thinks the evidence points to it being natural rather than man-made.”[66]

Foreign policy

In 2020, Buck voted against the National Defense Authorization Act of 2021 which would prevent the president from withdrawing soldiers from Afghanistan without congressional approval.[67]

In 2021, during a House vote on a measure condemning the Myanmar coup d’état that overwhelmingly passed, Buck was among fourteen Republican Representatives who voted against it, for reasons reported to be unclear.[68]

In June 2021, Buck was one of forty-nine House Republicans who voted in favor of the repeal of the AUMF against Iraq.[69][70]

Guns

Buck opposes gun control and is endorsed by Gun Owners of America. He stated that he would “oppose any federal legislation to compile a database of gun owners or to further proscribe Americans’ freedoms under the Second Amendment“.[71]

Healthcare

He opposes the health care reform laws that were enacted in 2010. He instead favors free market-based reforms.[64] His campaign website states, “We need to let the market work, make people responsible for their own insurance, and restore Americans’ freedom to decide for themselves whether and how much insurance to buy.”[72] He supported a state constitutional amendment that would give rights to unborn fetuses, but then later withdrew his support reportedly after he found out that the measure would have restricted certain fertility and contraception procedures.[73]

LGBT rights

Buck supports the U.S. military’s “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. He said, “I do not support the repeal of don’t ask don’t tell. I think it is a policy that makes a lot of sense.”[74] Buck believes that being gay is a choice. He said, “I think birth has an influence over it, like alcoholism … but I think that basically you have a choice.”[75] The Log Cabin Republicans have rebuked him for this comment.[76]

Net neutrality

Buck signed his support for Ajit Pai’s motion to abolish Net-Neutrality, alongside 106 other Republican representatives. When asked about Pai’s work to unravel net neutrality rules, Buck said: “I support Chairman Pai’s efforts to free internet providers from burdensome regulations that stifle innovation and increase costs for Coloradans.”[77]

National security

During debate over the USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020, Mr. Buck offered an amendment to the title of the bill so as to read: “A bill to be known as the Federal Initiative to Spy on Americans (FISA) Act.” With only 35 votes in favor, the amendment was not adopted.[78]

Veterans health

Buck proposed privatizing Veterans Administration hospitals so they would “be better run”.[79] Three months later, Buck changed positions and his campaign said, “… while Buck does indeed believe that private sector providers might do a better job than the VA in delivering health care to veterans, he is not in favor of fully privatizing health care for veterans.”[80]

Personal life

Both of Buck’s marriages ended in divorce. Buck has two children from his first marriage. Son Cody (born 1988) is a 2011 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York. In 2017, Buck authored the book Drain the Swamp: How Washington Corruption is Worse Than You Think.[81][82] Buck and his second wife, Perry, announced their divorce on November 9, 2018, three days after the midterm election.[83]

References

  1. ^ “Buck elected Weld district attorney | GreeleyTribune.com”. Greeley Tribune. August 11, 2004.
  2. ^ Moylan, Joe (December 21, 2014). “Michael Rourke wins Weld DA appointment | GreeleyTribune.com”. Greeley Tribune.
  3. ^ Silvy, Tyler (November 9, 2018). “Ken, Perry Buck to divorce | GreeleyTribune.com”. Greeley Tribune.
  4. ^ Politics, Ernest Luning Colorado. “U.S. Rep. Ken Buck elected to lead Colorado Republicans for next two years”. Colorado Springs Gazette.
  5. ^ a b Kelly, Makena (2021-07-06). “Rep. Ken Buck is the new face of Republican antitrust”. The Verge. Retrieved 2021-09-26.
  6. ^ a b “Analysis | The Technology 202: Rep. Ken Buck is trying to convince the GOP to hold tech companies accountable”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2021-09-26.
  7. ^ a b “Ken Buck is staring down Big Tech companies. And powerful people in his political party”. The Denver Post. 2021-06-27. Retrieved 2021-09-26.
  8. ^ “How Old Is Ken Buck?”. Politics Daily. 2010-10-04. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e Allison Sherry “Ken Buck’s family background helps him stand strong on principles” July 29, 2010, Denver Post
  10. ^ Owiny, Eunice (2014), “Caught between a rock and a hard place”, Crises, Conflict and Disability, Routledge, pp. 202–209, doi:10.4324/9780203069943-24, ISBN 978-0-203-06994-3
  11. ^ “All Ivy Tigers”. 2002-10-22. Archived from the original on 2002-10-22. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  12. ^ Allison Sherry (2010-09-26). “Bucks’ East Coast ambition meets West allure”. Denver Post. Retrieved 2010-10-30.
  13. ^ a b c d Allison Sherry “Belittled case drew Senate candidate Buck a rebuke from boss” June 24, 2010, The Denver Post
  14. ^ a b c d e “A conversation with Ken Buck”. The Denver Post. July 18, 2010.
  15. ^ “Suspect in troubling ’05 Buck case said he knew it was rape”. The Colorado Independent. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  16. ^ “Buck’s refusal to prosecute 2005 rape case reverberates in U.S. Senate race”. The Colorado Independent. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  17. ^ Waddingham, Rebecca (8 July 2008). “Woman Angry that Her Sex Assault Case Won’t be Prosecuted”. Archived from the original on October 15, 2010. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  18. ^ “Rape case catches up with Ken Buck – Salon.com”. Salon. 2010-10-12. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  19. ^ a b c “Colorado GOP Chair Ken Buck pressured local official to submit incorrect election results”. The Denver Post. May 7, 2020. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020.
  20. ^ Federal Election Commission filing; Ken Buck for U.S. Senate, The Colorado Statesman, May 1, 2010
  21. ^ a b Sherry, Allison (15 April 2010). “Long-shot Senate candidate Buck hits bull’s-eye in Colo. – The Denver Post”. The Denver Post. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  22. ^ Sherry, Allison (July 26, 2010). “Senate hopeful Buck regrets criticism of Tea Party birthers”. Denver Post.
  23. ^ “Long-shot Senate candidate Buck hits bull’s-eye in Colo. – The Denver Post”. April 17, 2010. Archived from the original on 2010-04-17.
  24. ^ “Senate hopeful Buck regrets criticism of Tea Party birthers – The Denver Post”. July 29, 2010. Archived from the original on 2010-07-29.
  25. ^ Lorber, Janie (2010-07-22). “In Colorado race, a focus on footwear”. The Caucus (blog). The New York Times. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  26. ^ “Jane Norton ad takes on Ken Buck over ‘high heels’ comment”. denverpost.com. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  27. ^ “GOP Rivals Jane Norton, Ken Buck Fight Over “High Heels” and Manhood”. cbsnews.com. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  28. ^ a b “Colorado Democrats and GOP Senate hopeful Jane Norton scold Ken Buck”. The Spot (blog). The Denver Post. 2010-06-24. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  29. ^ Buck defeats Norton in bruising GOP primary for Senate seat, Allison Sherry, The Denver Post, August 11, 2010
  30. ^ “Can he Buck the system?”. politico.com. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  31. ^ “Colorado – Election Results 2010 – The New York Times”. nytimes.com. Retrieved August 3, 2016.
  32. ^ “Results” (PDF). www.sos.state.co.us. 2010. Retrieved 2020-05-09.
  33. ^ Davis, Susan (8 August 2013). “Ken Buck enters Colo. Senate race”. USA Today. Retrieved 20 August 2013.
  34. ^ “Ken Buck Drops Senate Bid to Run for Cory Gardner’s Seat”. Roll Call. February 26, 2014. Retrieved December 25, 2014.
  35. ^ “Official Colorado Secretary of State Results”. Retrieved 25 December 2014.
  36. ^ “Official Results November 4, 2014 General Election”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved December 25, 2014.
  37. ^ “June 28, 2016 Primary Election Official Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  38. ^ “Official Results November 8, 2016 General Election”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  39. ^ “2018 Colorado Republican primary election results”. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  40. ^ “2018 Colorado general election results”. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  41. ^ “June 30, 2020 Primary Election – Official Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  42. ^ “2020 General Election – Official Compiled Results”. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  43. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (19 December 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  44. ^ Matthews, Mark K. (20 December 2017). “How Colorado lawmakers voted on the federal tax overhaul — and why”. The Denver Post. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  45. ^ Cochrane, Emily (March 4, 2020). “House Passes $8.3 Billion Emergency Coronavirus Response Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  46. ^ Shutt, Jennifer (March 4, 2020). “House OKs $8.3 billion coronavirus aid package with little debate”. Roll Call. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  47. ^ U.S. House passes $8.3B bill to battle coronavirus; Ken Buck casts 1 of 2 votes against it, Denver Post, Andrew Taylor (AP), March 4, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  48. ^ Lee, Jasmine (March 14, 2020). “How Every House Member Voted on the Coronavirus Relief Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved October 18, 2020.
  49. ^ GOP congressman says he will not take the Covid vaccine because he’s ‘an American’, The Independent, Danielle Zoellne, December 18, 2020. Retrieved December 19,2020.
  50. ^ “Colorado attorney general Phil Weiser, Rep. Ken Buck on opposite sides of Texas election lawsuit debate”. December 10, 2020.
  51. ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  52. ^ “What is the House Freedom Caucus, and who’s in it?”. Pew research center. 20 October 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  53. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. 2017-12-06. Retrieved 2021-03-28.
  54. ^ https://coloradonewsline.com/briefs/rep-buck-is-co-founder-of-new-anti-big-tech-caucus/
  55. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  56. ^ Liptak, Adam (2020-12-11). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  57. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. 2020-12-11. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  58. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  59. ^ Smith, David (2020-12-12). “Supreme court rejects Trump-backed Texas lawsuit aiming to overturn election results”. The Guardian. Retrieved 2020-12-13.
  60. ^ “Pelosi Statement on Supreme Court Rejecting GOP Election Sabotage Lawsuit” (Press release). Speaker Nancy Pelosi. December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  61. ^ Williams, Jordan (2020-12-11). “Democrat asks Pelosi to refuse to seat lawmakers supporting Trump’s election challenges”. TheHill. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  62. ^ Budryk, Zack (January 3, 2021). “Coalition of 7 conservative House Republicans says they won’t challenge election results”. The Hill. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  63. ^ “Respect for Life”. Buck campaign website. Archived from the original on September 2, 2010.
  64. ^ a b “Ken Buck (R) – WhoRunsGov.com, a Wash Post Co”. February 11, 2010. Archived from the original on 2010-02-11.
  65. ^ Moore, Robert (August 21, 2010). “Buck makes stop in Fort Collins, discusses statement making headlines this week”. The Coloradoan. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  66. ^ Allison Sherry Senate candidate Ken Buck clarifies comments on global warming “hoax” The Denver Post October 22, 2010
  67. ^ “H.R. 6395: William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act … — House Vote #152 — Jul 21, 2020”. GovTrack.us.
  68. ^ Diaz, Daniella; Wilson, Kristin (March 19, 2021). “14 House Republicans vote against a measure condemning military coup in Myanmar”. CNN. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  69. ^ “House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq War authorization”.
  70. ^ https://clerk.house.gov/evs/2021/roll172.xml
  71. ^ “Ken Buck’s Issue Positions (Political Courage Test)”. votesmart.org. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  72. ^ Buck campaign website.[dead link]
  73. ^ “Dems seize on Tea Party candidates social issues”, Associated Press
  74. ^ “Senate debates reveal stark differences between candidates :: Northern Colorado Gazette”. Greeley Gazette. September 27, 2010. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  75. ^ “Buck Stands By Controversial Remarks”, Politico.com
  76. ^ “Log Cabin Republicans news release”. logcabin.org. Archived from the original on 2010-10-22. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  77. ^ Chuang, Tamara; Paul, Jesse (2017-12-14). “Reporter”. Denver Post. The Denver Post. Retrieved 15 December 2017.
  78. ^ Buck, Ken (2020-03-11). “H.Amdt.814 to H.R.6172 – 116th Congress (2019-2020)”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved 2020-08-18.
  79. ^ Keyes, Scott (24 September 2010). “Ken Buck Campaign Can’t Get Their Story Straight On Whether They Support Privatizing VA Hospitals”. thinkprogress.org. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  80. ^ “Buck on VA health care privatizing”. KDVR/Fox 31 TV. Denver, Colorado. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011.
  81. ^ “Ken Buck’s family background helps him stand strong on principles – The Denver Post”. July 31, 2010. Archived from the original on 2010-07-31.
  82. ^ “Buck’s ‘Draining the Swamp’ is a primer on Washington corruption”. The Hill.
  83. ^ Silvy, Tyler (2018-11-09). “Ken, Perry Buck to divorce | GreeleyTribune.com”. Greeley Tribune. Retrieved 2020-03-07.

External links

Legal offices
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2004–2014
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from Colorado’s 4th congressional district

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Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Ken Buck (R)224,03860.6%
Karen McCormick (D)145,54439.4%
TOTAL369,582

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

BUCK, KENNETH R (KEN) has run in 5 races for public office, winning 3 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $7,232,589.

Source: Follow the Money

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Subcommittees

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X
Doug LambornDoug Lamborn – CO5

Current Position: US Representative for CO-05 since 2007
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Senior member, House Committee on Natural Resources

Quote:
“I will also continue to work to reduce unnecessary regulations that prohibit prosperity and protect recreational access on our public lands, which are essential for our outdoor Colorado lifestyle.”

Featured Video:
Congressman Lamborn Pushes Back Against Critical Race Theory in the Military

Lamborn and Crow propose establishment of Space Force National Guard
Space News, Sandra ErwinAugust 30, 2021 (Short)

WASHINGTON — Reps. Doug Lamborn (R) and Jason Crow (D), both from Colorado, announced Aug. 30 they are introducing legislation to establish a Space National Guard as a reserve component of the U.S. Space Force.

Lamborn and Crow are members of the House Armed Services Committee and co-chairs of the House Space Force Caucus.  The HASC on Wednesday is scheduled to take up the National Defense Authorization Act for 2022.

The issue of whether the Space Force should have its own Space National Guard has been debated since the Space Force was signed into law in December 2019. National Guard Bureau leaders have openly challenged DoD’s decision to stand up a U.S. Space Force without defining the role the National Guard would play in supporting the new service.

Eight states — Alaska, Hawaii, California, Colorado, Florida, New York, Arkansas and Ohio — and Guam have nearly 2,000 personnel who specialize in space operations. Most are from the Air National Guard and a small number are from the Army National Guard.

Guard units have expertise in space operations such as strategic missile warning, space situational awareness, space control, electronic warfare satellite command and control, satellite communications, space launch, and some support the National Reconnaissance Office.

“Colorado has more Guardsmen conducting space missions than any state in the Union. I am happy to join Rep. Crow on this important issue,” Lamborn said in a statement Aug. 30.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for CO-05 since 2007
Affiliation: Republican

Other positions:
Senior member, House Committee on Natural Resources

Quote:
“I will also continue to work to reduce unnecessary regulations that prohibit prosperity and protect recreational access on our public lands, which are essential for our outdoor Colorado lifestyle.”

Featured Video:
Congressman Lamborn Pushes Back Against Critical Race Theory in the Military

News

Lamborn and Crow propose establishment of Space Force National Guard
Space News, Sandra ErwinAugust 30, 2021 (Short)

WASHINGTON — Reps. Doug Lamborn (R) and Jason Crow (D), both from Colorado, announced Aug. 30 they are introducing legislation to establish a Space National Guard as a reserve component of the U.S. Space Force.

Lamborn and Crow are members of the House Armed Services Committee and co-chairs of the House Space Force Caucus.  The HASC on Wednesday is scheduled to take up the National Defense Authorization Act for 2022.

The issue of whether the Space Force should have its own Space National Guard has been debated since the Space Force was signed into law in December 2019. National Guard Bureau leaders have openly challenged DoD’s decision to stand up a U.S. Space Force without defining the role the National Guard would play in supporting the new service.

Eight states — Alaska, Hawaii, California, Colorado, Florida, New York, Arkansas and Ohio — and Guam have nearly 2,000 personnel who specialize in space operations. Most are from the Air National Guard and a small number are from the Army National Guard.

Guard units have expertise in space operations such as strategic missile warning, space situational awareness, space control, electronic warfare satellite command and control, satellite communications, space launch, and some support the National Reconnaissance Office.

“Colorado has more Guardsmen conducting space missions than any state in the Union. I am happy to join Rep. Crow on this important issue,” Lamborn said in a statement Aug. 30.

Twitter

About

Doug Lamborn 1

Source: Government page

Born in Leavenworth, Kansas in 1954, Doug had service-before-self instilled in him at an early age by his father, a World War II combat veteran and a corrections officer at the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary.

After meeting his wife Jeanie, Doug graduated from the University of Kansas with a Journalism Degree (as a National Merit Scholar). As they began to raise their five children, Doug worked hard to put himself through law school, earning a law degree from the University of Kansas before moving his family to Colorado Springs, Colorado, to practice business and real estate law.

In Colorado, Doug was called to public office and served in the Colorado General Assembly from 1995 to 2006, in both the State House and State Senate. During his time in the Colorado Legislature, Doug was elected Senate President Pro-Tem, served as Chairman of the Senate State Military and Veterans Affairs Committee, Chairman of the Senate Republican Caucus, and House Majority Whip.
Doug was the lead sponsor of the largest tax cut in Colorado history. Doug also introduced legislation creating a license plate honoring Bronze Star recipients, exempting active-duty soldiers from paying state income taxes, allowing public school students to recite the Pledge of Allegiance, eliminating and reducing state services to illegal immigrants, banning late-term abortions, implementing DNA testing of convicted felons, eliminating the sales tax on telephone service, eliminating the business personal property tax for thousands of businesses, and repealing expired and outdated laws. Many of these efforts successfully became law. While serving in the part-time Colorado General Assembly, Doug continued to practice law and raise a family.

Doug was then elected to the US House of Representatives in 2006 to represent Colorado’s Fifth District. Colorado’s Fifth District, based in Colorado Springs, is one of our nation’s most military-intensive congressional districts and the home to more than 100,000 veterans who have served our country with distinction and honor. Because of the district’s military and veteran concentration, Doug serves as a high-ranking member on the House Armed Services Committee and a former member for ten years of the Veterans Affairs Committee. In these roles, he has protected important national defense funding, programs, and missions and has fought hard for the right of veterans to receive the healthcare they have earned. Additionally, the Congressman has worked since his first day in office to bring about a dignified and fitting National Veterans Cemetery to the Pikes Peak Region, which is now completed.

Additionally, Doug currently serves as the Ranking Member of the Readiness Subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee. The Readiness Subcommittee is responsible for the single largest account with DOD’s budget. It oversees military readiness, training, logistics, maintenance issues and programs, military construction, installations, and family housing issues. The subcommittee makes sure that our troops and their loved ones receive the first-class benefits they deserve. Doug also serves on the Strategic Forces subcommittee, which oversees our nation’s nuclear weapons, ballistic missile defense, national security space programs, and Department of Energy national security programs, ensuring that our nation is properly prepared for any missile or nuclear attacks.

Doug also serves on the House Natural Resources Committee and its subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands, and the Energy and Mineral Resources subcommittee. The Subcommittee on Federal Lands is responsible for all matters related to the National Park System, U.S. Forests, public lands, and national monuments. The Energy and Mineral Resources subcommittee oversees public resources on public lands, including offshore energy development.

Throughout his time in public service, Doug has been a leader on pro-family and small business issues, a strong advocate for our veterans and our military, and a supporter of lower taxes, immigration reform, less government spending, and protection of the Second Amendment.

Doug is married to Jeanie, his wife of 45 years and an accomplished artist and former teacher at the Bemis School of Art in Colorado Springs. The Lamborn’s have also raised five extremely successful children. Their four sons were Eagle Scouts and, among them, have served as a doctor, in the military, as an attorney, and as a member of the film industry in Los Angeles. Their daughter was an accomplished Division I track and field athlete and an advanced degree in creative non-fiction. Three of their children are married, and among them, they have six grandchildren.

Committees

House Committee on Natural Resources
2007 – 2021 (117th Congress)
“I am pleased to continue working on the House Committee on Natural Resources during the 117th Congress,” said Congressman Doug Lamborn. “As a senior member of the House Committee on Natural Resources, I will push to end the Biden Administration’s moratorium ban on new oil and gas leases and other anti-energy policies that would put Americans with high-paying jobs out of work. These burdensome policies will hurt American families with higher energy prices during a time when they are recovering from a pandemic. We should promote an all-of-the-above energy policy that ensures affordable, domestically produced energy, and security, for all Americans.

“Rep. Lamborn represents a resources-rich district, and I’ve had the privilege of collaborating with him on many of these issues in the past,” said Ranking Member Bruce Westerman. “I’m so glad to have him on the Committee again this year, and I look forward to learning from his expertise and working with him on policy priorities that affect every American, regardless of where they live. Welcome to the team!”
Energy and Mineral Resources Subcommittee
National Parks, Forest, and Public Lands Subcommittee

House Armed Services Committee
2008 – 2021 (117th Congress)

Readiness Subcommittee (Ranking Member)
Strategic Forces Subcommittee
“Unwavering Commitment”As a member of the House Armed Services Committee Congressman Doug Lamborn has been a strong advocate on behalf of our troops. House Armed Services Committee Ranking Member Mike Rogers said this about Rep. Lamborn’s work on HASC:

“Doug is a tireless fighter for our military members and their families. Between his work as Ranking Member of the Readiness Subcommittee and fighting for Colorado’s Fifth District’s interests, Doug is focused on our national security and those who work to keep us safe. I’m grateful for his leadership to ensure our troops have the resources and tools they need for their missions and at home.”

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Experience

Work Experience

  • Colorado General Assembly
    1995 to 2006

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1954
Place of Birth: Leavenworth, KS
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Christian
Spouse: Jeanie Lamborn
Children: Eve Lamborn

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
2371 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-4422
Fax: (202) 226-2638

Colorado Springs Office
1125 Kelly Johnson Blvd. Suite 330
Colorado Springs, CO 80920
Phone: (719) 520-0055
Fax: (719) 520-0840

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Douglas Lawrence Lamborn (born May 24, 1954) is an American attorney and politician currently serving as the U.S. Representative for Colorado’s 5th congressional district. He is a member of the Republican Party. Having first been elected in 2006 and taking office in 2007, his district is based in Colorado Springs.

Early life and career

Born in Leavenworth, Kansas, Lamborn attended Lansing High School, in Lansing, Kansas. After graduation, Lamborn earned a B.S. in journalism from the University of Kansas in 1978 and J.D. from the University of Kansas School of Law in 1985. He moved to Colorado Springs, Colorado and became a private attorney focusing on business and real estate law.[1][2]

Colorado Legislature

Elections

In 1994, Lamborn was elected to the Colorado House of Representatives. In 1998, he was elected to the Colorado State Senate.

He was elected Republican House Whip in 1997. He was elected Senate President Pro-tem in 1999. Lamborn served in the Colorado Senate until winning a seat in the United States Congress.[3]

Tenure

While in the State Senate Lamborn sponsored the largest tax cut in Colorado State history,[4] and was named the highest-ranking tax cutter in the Senate five times, by a conservative activist group called the Colorado Union of Taxpayers.[3]

Committee assignments

Lamborn was the ranking Republican on the Colorado State Military and Veterans Affairs, and Appropriations committees.

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2006

On February 16, 2006, Joel Hefley announced he would retire after 10 terms in Congress.[5]

In the Republican primary to succeed him, Hefley backed his long-time aide, former Administrative Director Jeff Crank. The election was held on August 8, 2006, with Lamborn narrowly defeating Crank and four other candidates to win the party nomination in a contentious six-way race. In the Republican primary, he ran on conservative positions:[6] opposing gun control, abortion except when the mother’s life is threatened, federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, not providing public benefits to illegal immigrants, and new eminent domain rulings.[7]

He ran against Lieutenant Colonel Jay Fawcett, the Democratic nominee for the open seat in Colorado’s 5th congressional district. Lamborn won the election on November 7, 2006.

2008

Jeff Crank and Major General Bentley Rayburn[8] both challenged Lamborn in the 2008 Republican primary. Both lost to Lamborn in the 2006 primary. Lamborn won the primary election on August 12, 2008 with 45 percent[9] of the 56,171 votes cast. Crank got 29 percent and Rayburn got 26 percent.

Lamborn defeated Democratic challenger Lieutenant Colonel Hal Bidlack in the 2008 election.

2010

Lamborn was challenged by Democratic nominee Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Bradley. He won re-election.

2012

Lamborn was challenged in the Republican primary by businessman Robert Blaha. Lamborn won 62–38 percent.[10] He had the support of Phyllis Schlafly‘s Eagle Forum political action committee.[11]

2014

Lamborn was challenged by Democratic nominee Major General Irv Halter. He won with 59.8% of the vote.[12]

2018

In January 2018, Lamborn announced he would be running for re-election in the 2018 elections. When a Colorado High Court ruling initially disqualified Lamborn from appearing on the June primary ballot due to questions of signatures and residency, Lamborn was reinstated on the ballot after a federal judge ruled in Lamborn’s favor citing his First Amendment claim.[13] He faced and defeated three challengers in the Republican primary.[14] He went on to win the general election.[15]

2020

On January 9, Lamborn declared his candidacy for an eighth term as representative for Colorado’s fifth district.[16] He qualified for the primary ballot in March with over 2,000 valid signatures and won the June 30 primary unopposed.[17] In the November general election, Lamborn defeated Democratic candidate Jillian Freeland.[18]

Tenure

An office of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency was established in Colorado Springs in Lamborn’s district. The office opened in February 2009 and increased immigration enforcement agents in the area from two to ten. “The immediate need is to address those that have committed a crime and make sure they’re sent out of the country”, Lamborn said. However, this would not place in jeopardy employers who hire illegal immigrants in the first place or who pay these workers without any withholding tax or below the minimum wage.[19]

There has also been a Brigade Combat Team in his district since December 2007. The Brigade Combat Team consisting of almost 5,000 soldiers, their families, support personnel as well as increased military construction.[20]

Congressional Quarterly said that through the first August recess, Lamborn had voted by strict partisan lines the most of any member in the U.S. House and more than any other Republican.[6]

He led an effort among conservative Republicans to force the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to discard proposed regulations that would have affected accessibility to small arms ammunition, which were opposed by Second Amendment groups.[21]

In February 2010, the National Journal named Lamborn the most conservative member of the U.S. House of Representatives.[22]

Lamborn is one of the House Republicans leading the effort against public funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and NPR (National Public Radio). “I have been seeking to push Big Bird out of the nest for over a year, based on the simple fact that we can no longer afford to spend taxpayer dollars on nonessential government programs. It’s time for Big Bird to earn his wings and learn to fly on his own.”
[23]

On August 24, 2007, Jonathan Bartha, who works for Focus on the Family (headquartered in Colorado Springs), and his wife Anna wrote a letter to the editor in a community newspaper expressing concerns about Lamborn’s opposition to more restrictions on dog fighting. They were also concerned he had taken several campaign contributions from the gaming industry. A few days later, Lamborn allegedly left two voice mails threatening “consequences” if they didn’t renounce their “blatantly false” letter. He also said that he would be “forced to take other steps” if the matter wasn’t resolved “on a Scriptural level.” The Barthas were shocked by the messages, and Anna Bartha called Lamborn’s behavior “not anything we would ever anticipate an elected official would pursue.”[24]

As a freshman representative, Lamborn introduced legislation directing the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to establish a national cemetery for veterans in the Pikes Peak region of Colorado.[25] On September 20, 2017, the Veterans Administration awarded a $31.8 Million contract to G&C Fab-Con, LLC, to begin construction on the Pikes Peak National Cemetery in Colorado Springs. Over 13,000 new burial spaces will be available in 2019 and later development will accommodate an estimated 95,000 total spaces. The contract has a Fall 2019 completion date.[26]

Lamborn is a signer of Americans for Tax Reform‘s Taxpayer Protection Pledge.[27]

In 2008 Lamborn signed a pledge sponsored by Americans for Prosperity promising to vote against any Global Warming legislation that would raise taxes.[28]

Lamborn voted in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[29] Lamborn claims the bill will benefit craft beer breweries, many of which are located in Colorado, a benefit touted by Lamborn.[30] Lamborn claims the tax code was simplified in the bill, specifically that people would be filing taxes by “sending a postcard,” however, the tax filing process will remain the same, without simplification.[31]

On July 29, 2011, Lamborn appeared on a Denver radio program to discuss the debt crisis and the failure of Democrats and Republicans to reach a compromise on the problem. Lamborn stated “Now, I don’t even want to have to be associated with President Obama. It’s like touching a tar baby and you get it, you’re stuck, and you’re a part of the problem now and you can’t get away.”[32] The term tar baby is sometimes considered to be a racial slur used towards African-Americans. Former Colorado House Speaker Terrance Carroll, an African-American, replied, “Looking beyond the fact that Congressman Lamborn’s entire comment is nonsensical, his use of the term ‘tar baby’ is unfortunate because [of] the historical connotation of that term when used in conjunction with African Americans.”[33]

On August 1, 2011, Lamborn apologized for his use of the slur, “When I said ‘tar baby’, I was talking economic quagmire that our country is finding ourselves in because of poor economic policy from the White House. I could have used a better term.”[34]

On January 23, 2012, Lamborn announced he would not be attending the President’s State of the Union address. According to his spokeswoman Catherine Mortenson, “Congressman Lamborn is doing this to send a clear message that he does not support the policies of Barack Obama, that they have hurt our country”, and believed Obama was “in full campaign mode and will use the address as an opportunity to bash his political opponents.”[35]

On April 11, 2013, Lamborn read out in an open session broadcast on C-SPAN an unclassified section from a classified report on North Korean nuclear capabilities. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs refused to confirm the classified report.[36] The Pentagon later confirmed that the Defense Intelligence Agency had marked that sentence as unclassified mistakenly.[37]

Doug Lamborn is one of the 80 members of the House that signed a letter to the speaker of the house, urging the threat of a government shutdown to defund Obamacare. This group was named the “Suicide Caucus”.[38] He voted against the measure that finally ended the shutdown on October 16, 2013
[39]

September 13, 2014, during a question & answer part of his speech, Doug Lamborn made controversial remarks concerning President Obama’s foreign policy. According to reports, Doug Lamborn is quoted to have said “A lot of us are talking to the generals behind the scenes, saying, ‘Hey, if you disagree with the policy that the White House has given you, let’s have a resignation. You know, let’s have a public resignation, and state your protest, and go out in a blaze of glory!’” [40]

Lamborn supported President Donald Trump‘s 2017 executive order to impose a temporary ban on entry to the U.S. to citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries. He stated that “By taking steps to temporarily stop refugee admittance from nations that are hotbeds of terrorist activity, the President is taking prudent action to ensure that his national security and law enforcement teams have the strategies and systems in place that they will need to protect and defend America.”[41]

Lamborn was among GOP members of the House who did not support Speaker Paul Ryan‘s March 2017 effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Seeking a more thorough repeal of the healthcare law, Lamborn said that, “Right now Obamacare stays in place. That’s bad for the American people and it doesn’t leave Republicans an immediate opportunity to carry out their pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare. We need to regroup and very soon find a way to do that.”[42] Subsequent town hall meetings in April 2017 underscored the tension of Lamborn’s relationship with the initial policies of the Trump Administration and voters in Lamborn’s district.[43]

Lamborn was one of only two members of the Colorado delegation to vote to not accept the Electoral College vote for the State of Pennsylvania, even after the violent takeover of Congress by Trump supporters. On January 6, 2021, he voted in support of not certifying the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count citing unproven voter fraud claims.[44]

Legislation

Lamborn supported Senate bill 2195, a bill that would allow the President of the United States to deny visas to any ambassador to the United Nations who has been found to have been engaged in espionage activities or a terrorist activity against the United States or its allies and may pose a threat to U.S. national security interests.[45]

The bill was written in response to Iran‘s choice of Hamid Aboutalebi as their ambassador.[46] Aboutalebi was controversial due to his involvement in the Iran hostage crisis, in which of a number of American diplomats from the US embassy in Tehran were held captive in 1979.[46][47][48] Lamborn said that selection by Iran of Aboutalebi as their U.N. ambassador was “unconscionable and unacceptable”. He argued that this legislation was needed in order to give the President the “authority he needs to deny this individual a visa.”[46]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Economy

Lamborn does not support increasing minimum wage and believes that at least 500,000 Americans will lose their jobs as a result of wage increases.[55] Lamborn supports social security reform.[55]

Education

Lamborn does not support Common Core State Standards. He has described Common Core as “deeply flawed” and claimed that it “lowers educational standards,” and removes parental influence over children’s educations.[55]

Elections

Texas v. Pennsylvania

In December 2020, Lamborn was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives who signed an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden prevailed[56] over incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of the election held by another state.[57][58][59]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of “election subversion.” Additionally, Pelosi reprimanded Lamborn and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”[60][61] New Jersey Representative Bill Pascrell, citing section three of the 14th Amendment, called for Pelosi to not seat Lamborn and the other Republicans who signed the brief supporting the suit. Pascrell argued that “the text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems like a pretty clear example of that.”[62]

Environment

Lamborn believes federal fees that impact the energy industry regarding climate change should not exist.[55]

Gun policy

Lamborn does not support any new restrictions on gun sales.[55]

Healthcare

Lamborn has called the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) a “disaster.” He supports the repeal, replacement and defunding of the program. He wants it to be replaced with unspecified “conservative, free-market solutions.”[55]

He supports the reform of Medicare and says that it is a “wasteful entitlement.”[55]

Social issues

Lamborn is anti-abortion,[55] opposes same-sex marriage[55] “does not support amnesty of any kind”, and supports further efforts to secure the border.[55] In 2015 in response to Christmas controversies, he introduced Resolution 564, receiving 35 cosponsors, to assert Christmas in public.[63]

Lamborn opposes the legalization of marijuana.[55]

Covid-19 lawsuit

A former aide in May 2021 filed a federal lawsuit under the under the Congressional Accountability Act accusing Lamborn of recklessly exposing staffers to the novel coronavirus and firing the aide when he raised objections. The lawsuit also alleges Lamborn allowed his son to live in the Capitol basement while he was relocating to Washington for work. The lawsuit also asserted that Lamborn often called the pandemic a “hoax,” lied to a Capitol physician, asked aides to run family errands, including loading furniture to be moved to their vacation home, and had aides assist his son in completing applications for federal jobs. The suit alleges that staffers were instructed not to tell anyone, including their families, roommates and friends, that they had been in close contact with several office staffers who had tested positive for Covid-19 infection. Lamborn’s office issued a statement denying the allegations.[64]

References

  1. ^ “Doug Lamborn”. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. US Congress. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  2. ^ “Biography”. Office of Rep. Doug Lamborn. Archived from the original on 2014-06-28.
  3. ^ a b “Lamborn for Congress”. 2006-12-13. Archived from the original on 2007-02-09. Retrieved 2016-11-20.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  4. ^ “The Club For Growth – http://www.clubforgrowth.org”. October 11, 2008. Archived from the original on October 11, 2008. External link in |title= (help)
  5. ^ Sprengelmeyer, M.E. (2006-02-17). “Hefley calls it a career”. Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on 2006-09-08. Retrieved 2006-10-03.
  6. ^ a b Giroux, Greg (2007-08-10). “CQPolitics.com Candidate Watch”. Congressional Quarterly.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ Rep. Elect Doug Lamborn profile Congressional Quarterly, November 8, 2006.
  8. ^ “MAJOR GENERAL BENTLEY B. RAYBURN”. www.af.mil.
  9. ^ “Just In”. TheHill.
  10. ^ Wyatt, Kristen (June 26, 2012). “Rep. Doug Lamborn holds on in Colorado primary”. Denver Post.
  11. ^ “Candidates endorsed by Eagle Forum PAC”. eagleforum.org. October 31, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2012.
  12. ^ “Colorado Secretary of State webpage”. sos.state.co.us. Retrieved August 18, 2015.
  13. ^ Hutchins, Corey (2018-05-01). “Federal judge rules six-term GOP congressman Doug Lamborn should be on the ballot after Colorado’s High Court says he shouldn’t”. Colorado Independent. Retrieved 2020-09-22.
  14. ^ Luning, Ernest (2018-01-10). “U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn launches bid for reelection, weighs petitioning onto primary ballot”. Colorado Politics. Retrieved 2018-01-10.
  15. ^ Swanson, Conrad (2018-11-06). “Doug Lamborn holds onto CD5 congressional seat”. The Colorado Springs Gazette. Retrieved 2019-01-08.
  16. ^ Greathouse, Melissa (2020-01-09). “Rep. Doug Lamborn announces reelection campaign”. KOAA News5. Retrieved 2020-09-22.
  17. ^ Luning, Ernest (2020-03-14). “Republican Doug Lamborn makes ballot by petition in bid for 8th term in Congress”. Colorado Politics. Retrieved 2020-09-22.
  18. ^ Luning, Ernest (2020-03-30). “Jillian Freeland emerges from weekend’s virtual assemblies as presumptive Lamborn challenger”. Colorado Politics. Retrieved 2020-09-22.
  19. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on 2008-01-22. Retrieved 2007-12-23.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  20. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on 2007-12-21. Retrieved 2007-12-23.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  21. ^ Labor Department Announces It Will Revise Overreaching OSHA Explosives Rule Archived 2007-10-10 at the Wayback Machine. National Rifle Association of America, Institute for Legislative Action. Retrieved September 24, 2007.
  22. ^ “POLITICAL NOTEBOOK: Lamborn ranked most conservative in Congress”. Gazette.com. 2010-02-26. Archived from the original on 2010-10-01. Retrieved 2010-08-23.
  23. ^ “NPR CEO Vivian Schiller’s Ouster May Be Last Straw for Taxpayer Funding” Archived 2011-03-11 at the Wayback Machine AOL News. March 9, 2011; retrieved March 9, 2011.
  24. ^ Emery, Erin (September 2, 2007). “Lamborn message has couple in dismay”. Denver Post. Retrieved August 4, 2011.
  25. ^ H.R. 295 at Congress.gov
  26. ^ Zubeck, Pam (25 September 2017). “Veterans cemetery contract awarded”. Colorado Springs Independent. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  27. ^ “The Taxpayer Protection Pledge Signers 112th Congressional List” (PDF). Americans for Tax Reform. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  28. ^ “Americans for Prosperity : News Release : Americans for Prosperity Applauds U.S. House of Representative Doug Lamborn”. Americansforprosperity. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-02-19. Retrieved 2016-11-20.
  29. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (19 December 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  30. ^ Matthews, Mark K. (20 December 2017). “How Colorado lawmakers voted on the federal tax overhaul — and why”. The Denver Post. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  31. ^ Ohlemacher, Stephen; Gordon, Marcy (19 December 2017). “Senate moves tax cut legislation to brink of final passage — REP. COFFMAN VOTES ‘YES’ — Colorado delegation comments – Aurora Sentinel”. Aurora Sentinel. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  32. ^ “Doug Lamborn Tar Baby”. youtube.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  33. ^ “GOP Rep. Lamborn: Associating with Obama is Like “Touching a Tar Baby. thinkprogress.org. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  34. ^ “Update: Rep. Doug Lamborn Offers Apology To President Obama”. krdo.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016.[permanent dead link]
  35. ^ “Doug Lamborn to ditch State of the Union speech as a protest”. politico.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  36. ^ “‘Speculative’ Pentagon report sets off North Korea nuclear worries” Reuters, accessed 20 November 2016.
  37. ^ “Mistake in classification led to N. Korea info being revealed”, CNN.com, April 11, 2013.
  38. ^ “Fox News’ Krauthammer: Cruz leading Republican ‘suicide caucus’ by opposing Obamacare”.
  39. ^ “Lamborn only Colorado lawmaker to vote against debt deal”. 17 October 2013.
  40. ^ “GOP Congressman Urges U.S. Generals To Resign In Protest Of Obama”. Huffington Post. September 26, 2014.
  41. ^ Blake, Aaron. “Coffman, Gardner join Republicans against President Trump’s travel ban; here’s where the rest stand”. Denver Post. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  42. ^ “Colorado plays key role in punt of health care bill”. Denver Post. March 24, 2017.
  43. ^ “Lamborn jeered at during GOP congressman’s first town hall meeting in Colorado Springs”. Colorado Springs Gazette. April 12, 2017.
  44. ^ Andrew McMillan (2021-01-04). “Rep. Doug Lamborn joins group of Republicans objecting to Electoral College results”. KRDO. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  45. ^ “S. 2195 – Summary”. United States Congress. Retrieved April 11, 2014.
  46. ^ a b c Marcos, Cristina (April 10, 2014). “Congress approves bill banning Iran diplomat”. The Hill. Retrieved April 11, 2014.
  47. ^ News, ABC. “2016 Presidential Candidates & Election News”.
  48. ^ Mackey, Robert (April 4, 2014). “Iran’s Reformers Include More Than One Former Hostage-Taker”. The New York Times.
  49. ^ “Members”. Congressional Constitution Caucus. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  50. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Archived from the original on 1 August 2018. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  51. ^ “Members”. House Baltic Caucus. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  52. ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved 25 June 2018.
  53. ^ “Members”. U.S. – Japan Caucus. Retrieved 11 December 2018.
  54. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  55. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Minor, Nathaniel. “Colorado Congressional District 5 race: Doug Lamborn, Irv Halter on the issues”. Colorado Public Radio. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  56. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  57. ^ Liptak, Adam (2020-12-11). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  58. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. 2020-12-11. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  59. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  60. ^ Smith, David (2020-12-12). “Supreme court rejects Trump-backed Texas lawsuit aiming to overturn election results”. The Guardian. Retrieved 2020-12-13.
  61. ^ “Pelosi Statement on Supreme Court Rejecting GOP Election Sabotage Lawsuit” (Press release). Speaker Nancy Pelosi. December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  62. ^ Williams, Jordan (2020-12-11). “Democrat asks Pelosi to refuse to seat lawmakers supporting Trump’s election challenges”. TheHill. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  63. ^ Gingrich, Newt (17 December 2015). “The war on Christmas”. The Washington Times. Rep. Doug Lamborn of Colorado took a small but important step in Congress this week when he introduced a resolution, H. Res. 564, along with 35 cosponsors, to reassert the place of Christmas in the public square. The resolution “recognizes the importance of the symbols and traditions of Christmas; strongly disapproves of attempts to ban references to Christmas; and expresses support for the use of these symbols and traditions by those who celebrate Christmas.”
  64. ^ Hsu, Spencer S. (May 13, 2021). “Former aide says congressman recklessly exposed staff to coronavirus, let son live in Capitol basement”. The Washington Post. Retrieved May 14, 2021.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Colorado’s 5th congressional district

2007–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
96th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Doug Lamborn (R)184,00257%
Stephany Rose Spaulding (D)126,84839.3%
Douglass Randall (L)11,7953.7%
TOTAL322,645

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

LAMBORN, DOUGLAS L (DOUG) has run in 9 races for public office, winning 8 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $3,143,920.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Committee on Armed Services
House Committee on Natural Resources

Subcommittees

Tactical Air and Land Forces
Readiness
Energy and Mineral Resources, Water, Oceans, and Wildlife

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Congress.gov

Issues

Budget and Spending

We need to restore fiscal responsibility in Washington, D.C. The independent Congressional Budget Office has noted several times that our federal spending is unsustainable.

Constitution

When I was sworn in as a Member of Congress, I took an oath to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.”

Education

I am deeply concerned by the deterioration of our nation’s public school system.

Energy and Environment

American energy is the fuel that drives our economy and our way of life. That is why I support a free-market, all-of-the-above approach to harness our vast natural resources and keep prices low for American families.

Foreign Affairs

In the realm of foreign affairs, I am committed to ensuring U.S. national security, promoting free trade, defending our allies, protecting U.S. sovereignty, and fighting for religious freedom.

Gun Rights

As a United States Representative, I took an oath of office to “support and defend” the Constitution—including the Second Amendment.

Health Care

Whether you are a small business owner, an employee, or a parent, the quality and cost of your healthcare influence your quality of life. Since Obamacare ushered in a government takeover of our healthcare system representing one-sixth of our economy, I have heard from many of you about your struggles with Obamacare. The ill-fated law isn’t working for you.

Historic Tax Reform

Tax reform will undoubtedly boost the economy, create jobs, and lower taxes. Americans will keep more hard-earned money in their pocket. The standard deduction will double, meaning the tax bracket the federal government does not tax will expand to $12,000 for single filers and $24,000 for married couples. The Child Tax Credit will double from $1,000 to $2,000.

Illegal Immigration

The United States is a nation formed on the rule of law. Each year, however, hundreds of thousands of aliens deliberately violate our nation’s laws by unlawfully crossing U.S. borders.

Jobs and the Economy

The best way to get American families and businesses moving again is to allow them to keep more of their income. To give power back to the people, Congress should support across-the-board tax cuts. These cuts should be broad-based so that Washington isn’t picking the winners and losers, and they must be permanent so businesses can actually plan and invest.

National Security

Colorado’s Fifth District is the proud home to one of our nation’s most military-intensive congressional districts and to more than 100,000 veterans who have served our country with distinction and honor. My goal as a member of the House Armed Services Committee is to advocate on behalf of our troops.

Pro-Life

Congressman Lamborn’s legislative record reflects his unwavering dedication to protecting the sanctity of human life from conception to natural death, the terminally ill, and all whose lives are threatened by physician assisted suicide.

Social and Traditional Values

Our country has been blessed with greatness because it was founded upon sound principles by people of strong moral character. If we as a nation are to continue to progress, we cannot allow our fundamental values to erode.

Transportation

Transportation, like water, is an important priority in a region with high growth like ours. It is important that we concentrate on maintaining safe roads and highways in a manner that reflects our growing needs.

Veterans

Learn about news and information related to Veterans issues.

Veterans Cemetery Information

The latest milestone in the long lived dream of the Pikes Peak National Cemetery is its dedication in May 2018 and burials available this fall. This solemn ceremony brought the community together to dedicate this land as the final resting place of our beloved veterans.

Governance

Budget and Spending

We need to restore fiscal responsibility in Washington, D.C. The independent Congressional Budget Office has noted several times that our federal spending is unsustainable. I take this issue very seriously and pledge as your Representative to fight to rein in spending, prioritize funding for our military and veterans, eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse, and put entitlement programs on a sustainable path forward.

Although Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid alone did not create our country’s debt problem, they are the leading drivers of the ever-growing federal deficit. They represent an astounding two-thirds of the national budget, subsequently crowd out other spending priorities. It is vitally important that we tackle entitlement reform to ensure the fiscal solvency of these programs for future generations.

Congress must take responsibility for its fiscal policy decisions. Too often, meaningful reforms addressing our government’s addiction to spending are pushed to the back burner. I’m working to change that. Rising debt hurts our economy. I want budgets that are fiscally responsible, that gets government out of the way of businesses, families and economic growth. If families across our state have to balance their budgets, the federal government should too. It’s also not fair to our future generations to be burdened reckless spending that takes place now. . I’m committed to responsible budget reforms. Let’s make the budget something we can all be proud of.

Major Budget Legislation

FY 2018 Budget: Building a Better America

I am proud to have worked with President Trump and my colleagues in the House to help pass the House FY 2018 budget. The Building a Better America budget balances the federal budget within 10 years and puts our government back on a path toward fiscal responsibility – and it does so without raising taxes or imposing crippling austerity measures on the American people. The national debt is already an impediment to greater economic growth and prosperity, and it is ultimately a threat to the financial security of future generations. For our government to continue to mortgage the prosperity of future generations to satisfy an addiction to deficit spending is not only fiscally irresponsible – it is morally wrong. That’s why I’m proud to have supported this budget, which significantly reduces spending and reforms government programs to put us on a sustainable fiscal path.

Balancing the Budget

Building a Better America balances the budget within 10 years by cutting spending, reforming government, and stimulating the economy. This budget achieves $6.5 trillion in total deficit reduction over 10 years and produces a $9 billion surplus in fiscal year 2027.

Promoting Economic Growth

For the past eight years, the federal government has stifled economic growth. This budget outlines the steps necessary to reverse this trend, prescribing a combination of pro-growth policies including deficit reduction, spending restraint, comprehensive tax reform, welfare reform, health care reform, and regulatory reform to move our federal government away from its Obama-era addiction to wasting the money you work hard to earn. Together, these significant reforms will promote more robust growth over the longer term.

Ensuring a Strong National Defense

As Representative of Colorado’s 5th Congressional District – a district with one of the highest concentrations of veterans in the United States and numerous active military installations– I understand that defending America’s security is the highest priority of the federal government. To that end, I am proud to support this budget because it has robust funding for troop training, equipment, compensation, and improved readiness.

Restoring the Proper Role of State and Local Governments

Building a Better America encourages the innovation and creativity of state and local governments. It calls for returning significant authority to the states, which possess not only the ability but also the will to reform and modernize programs that serve their citizens. Our Founding Fathers never intended the federal government to impose one-size-fits-all “solutions” to the states – they understood that the states, functioning as laboratories of democracy, not the federal government, are where these reforms should happen.

Reforming Government Programs While Improving Accountability

As your representative, I am well aware that every tax dollar collected by the federal government was taken, not earned, from real people working real jobs in the private sector. That’s why it’s important for  Congress to act as responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars – and that’s why at every opportunity Building a Better America reforms government programs and improves accountability, generating better outcomes for Americans.

For additional on the Building a Better America budget:

https://budget.house.gov/budgets/fy18/

Consitution

When I was sworn in as a Member of Congress, I took an oath to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.”

Many of the threats to our Constitutional liberties today don’t necessarily come from foreign enemies–they come from within our own nation. Threats to our freedoms stem from judicial activists that interpret the Constitution according to a progressive agenda, an Executive branch that makes laws and recklessly spends money, or even a legislature that forfeits its power of the purse to federal agencies.

I vow to stand with my colleagues in the House of Representatives to restore a Constitutional balance of power so that the government empowers you, the American people.

Major Constitutional Legislation

H.R. 4768 – Separation of Powers Restoration Act
The Separation of Powers Restoration Act (SOPRA) scales back the Chevron deference. I cosponsored this legislation that would free courts from the interpretations of federal agencies enforcing a statue. SOPRA restores the separation of powers by requiring de novo review of agency action for all relevant questions of law, including Constitutional and statutory interpretation. (Read my statement on H.R. 4768.)

H.R. 4956 – End Executive Overreach Act
This bill blocks the use of federal funds for any future executive orders through January 21, 20170–the end of President Obama’s term. It also prohibits federal agencies from making new rules that would cost over $100 million or rules that would need to be reviewed by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. I am a proud cosponsor of this bill that returns the power of the purse to Congress, the branch of government closest to the will of the people. (Read my statement on H.R. 4956.)

H.R. 5063 – Stop Settlement Slush Funds Act
This bill puts an end to the Department of Justice’s funding of activist groups. In the past, the Executive Branch has abused its power by directing settlement money from lawsuits to activist groups instead of the victims themselves. H.R. 5063 explicitly prohibits this practice and ensures that victims receive the full compensation they are entitled under the law. (Read my statement on H.R. 5063.)
H.R. 5226 – Regulatory Integrity Act of 2016
This important piece of legislation will make the federal government more open, transparent, and accountable to the American people. H.R. 5226 instructs all federal agencies to publicly release information about their regulatory actions in a format that is searchable online. With this law enacted, people will be able to read and examine every rule change by the Administration without closed doors or secret negotiations.

To read more about how Republicans in Congress plan to uphold the Constitution, read through the #BetterWay agenda online.  

Civil Rights

Gun Rights

As a United States Representative, I took an oath of office to “support and defend” the Constitution—including the Second Amendment. I believe that the right to bear arms is one of our nation’s most fundamental and vital protections. The Second Amendment rights of Americans are non-negotiable and are not open to infringement.

I am unwavering in my support for the right to keep and bear arms. There is no clause restricting or qualifying this right, or limiting it to merely target practice and hunting. The right to defend one’s self and one’s family applies to every American. Please know that I will continue to defend this fundamental constitutional right for you and your families.

Unfortunately, during the last administration President Obama used executive orders to restrict law abiding citizens’ access to firearms. The unilateral actions taken by the Obama Administration sought to undermine the rights afforded to all Americans in favor of his liberal agenda. Instead of developing a coherent strategy to keep the American people safe from attacks by criminals and terrorists, the actions proposed by President Obama did little to make us safer and only inhibited the efforts of Americans to exercise their Second Amendment rights.

I believe that we should vigorously enforce the more than 240 pages of existing federal gun regulations and work to strengthen our nation’s mental health system to provide families and patients access to the care they need. But we must ensure that actions taken to reduce violence are targeted, address underlying causes, and do not infringe upon our Second Amendment rights.

Major Actions on Second Amendment Rights

  • As an NDAA Conferee, I added provisions allowing for military members to carry firearms for personal protection on military bases.
  • I sent letters to Appropriations Committee members to defund the UN Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) and to prevent the use of the ATT for domestic prosecutions. In addition to these Second Amendment concerns, the ATT also poses threats to our domestic defense manufacturing base and our ability to defend our allies such as Taiwan and the State of Israel.
  • I fought the Obama Administration’s attempt to ban .223 M855 “green tip” ammunition.
  • H.R. 2406 the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act
    I supported this compilation of several bills that expand access to, and opportunities for, hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting. For more information on the SHARE Act, read the original press release.
  • H.R. 578, the Recreational Lands Self-Defense Act.
    Currently, legislation passed into law allows individuals to possess an assembled or functional firearm in any unit of the National Park Service or National Wildlife Refuge System, but not on any Army Corps of Engineers’ land.  H.R. 578 would prohibit the Secretary of the Army from enforcing any regulation that keeps an individual from possessing firearms on Army Corps Water Resource Development project if the individual is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing the firearm or if the possession of the firearm is in compliance with the law of the state in which the project is located.
  • H.R. 1413, the Firearm Manufacturers and Dealers Protection Act of 2015.
    Under Operation Choke Point, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and Department of Justice permitted Attorney General Eric Holder the means to cripple firearms and ammunition manufacturers by placing immense regulatory pressure on the financial institutions they do business with. H.R. 1413 would entirely defund any activities associated with Operation Choke Point and forbid the U.S. Attorney General from restarting a similar program.
  • H.R. 766, the Financial Institution Customer Protection Act
    This bill prohibits federal financial regulators from using subpoena powers to intimidate local banks from working with gun businesses.

Sponsored and Cosponsored Second Amendment Legislation

H.R. 4319 – Second Amendment Defense Act of 2016

H.R. 4321 – Separation of Powers Restoration and Second Amendment Protection Act

H.R. 2710 – Lawful Purpose and Self Defense Act

H.R. 2753 – Fairness in Firearm Testing Act

H.R. 2611 – Collectible Firearms Protection Act

H.R. 1739 – FIREARM Act

H.R. 3802 – Alternative Ammunition Manufacturing Act

Economy

Historic Tax Reform

Tax reform will undoubtedly boost the economy, create jobs, and lower taxes. Americans will keep more hard-earned money in their pocket. The standard deduction will double, meaning the tax bracket the federal government does not tax will expand to $12,000 for single filers and $24,000 for married couples. The Child Tax Credit will double from $1,000 to $2,000. All of this means that if you’re saving up your money for an investment or even savings you will now have the money to make that payment. The average family is going to see less money coming out of their paychecks to pay taxes.

Rep. Lamborn advocated for several measures throughout the bill’s process that will help ease the burden of taxes for many classes of people. He signed a letter to Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan requesting the Adoption Tax Credit remain in the bill. The credit makes it easier for families who choose to adopt. At one point in the bill’s development, a tax on graduate school tuition waivers was suggested. Rep. Lamborn agreed with his colleagues in a letter to Republican leadership that taxing graduate students, who already operate on a low budget, should not be permissible.

The Obamacare individual mandate is eliminated with this bill. The mandate made it illegal for people not to purchase government-approved health care. If you choose not to participate, the government majorly taxes you. With the newly-improved tax code, those with a low-income, usually the ones who could not afford health insurance, will no longer be punished with more taxes.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska is abundant in oil reserves. Special interests banned the area for energy development, which goes against the petitions of the Alaska delegation. This natural resource has the potential to bring thousands of jobs and thte tax bill opens that up. For the American economy as a whole, this means a major boost thanks to massive energy development.

Rep. Lamborn issued this statement after voting for the passage of the bill:

Congress listened to the American people and simplified our complicated tax code. This is a historic day for our country. Moving forward we can expect bigger paychecks and filing taxes will be as easy as sending a postcard. The middle and lower classes, for the first time in decades, will see more of their hard-earned money staying in their bank accounts. I’m looking forward to seeing the boom Colorado’s economy will experience. More jobs will be created, which means more opportunities for our region’s small business to expand, hire more workers, and invest.

Jobs & The Economy

The best way to get American families and businesses moving again is to allow them to keep more of their income. To give power back to the people, Congress should support across-the-board tax cuts. These cuts should be broad-based so that Washington isn’t picking the winners and losers, and they must be permanent so businesses can actually plan and invest.

The Administration and Congress should also act to remove the regulatory barriers to energy production and should streamline the existing permitting process.  Increased domestic energy production from all sources (including oil, natural gas, oil shale, nuclear, and renewables such as hydropower) will without a doubt lower energy costs, reduce our reliance on foreign energy, and create new jobs.

The threat of increased taxes, new government regulation, and costly government mandates are a significant threat to any employer who is trying to decide whether they can afford to expand. Since taking office, the Obama Administration has had under consideration over 100 regulations that are deemed economically significant, meaning they have an impact on the economy in excess of $100 million. Many of these rules will directly impact and burden businesses of various sizes. My priority is to push back against these regulations and create a vibrant market where businesses and individuals can thrive.

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

H.R. 3459 – Protecting Local Business Opportunity Act
H.R. 3472 – Adjusting Davis-Bacon for Inflation Act
H.R. 985 – Concrete Masonry Products Research, Education, and Promotion Act of 2015
H.R. 3421 – A PLUS Act
H.R. 2331 – No Welfare for Weed Act of 2015
H.R. 612 – National Right-to-Work Act
H.R. 662 – Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act of 2015
H.R. 287 – American Job Creation and Strategic Alliances LNG Act
H.R. 30 – Save American Workers Act of 2015

Education

Education

I am deeply concerned by the deterioration of our nation’s public school system. Many of our children receive low-quality education that undermines their potential and threatens our society. I believe our policies should enable parents and local school districts to choose school programs and curriculum that best fit students’ needs.

The federal government’s well-intentioned efforts to regulate our nation’s public schools have contributed to problems within our educational system. Our great country is too large and too diverse for a one-size-fits-all approach to education. We must limit the role of the federal government in our classrooms to allow parents and teachers to act in students’ best interest. I also believe we should distribute federal spending in block grants with few or no strings attached.

We can also give parents and students more freedom in their educational choices by allowing alternatives—such as school vouchers, charter schools, on-line education, home schooling, and education savings accounts. A refundable tax credit, equal to the cost of educating a child in a public school, should be given to parents who opt for these alternative programs that cost nothing to the public school system. The increased competition with public schools would also incentivize progress and improvement. I oppose any attempts by unions to limit education choices through unfair regulations.

Major Education Legislation:

H.R. 5 Student Success Act
I voted in strong support of this bill that replaces the failed standards of No Child Left Behind with localized, state-led systems. This legislation frees K–12 education from Common Core curriculum, reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), and funds programs for disadvantaged students and Title I schools. Parents, educators, and individual school districts will be empowered under H.R. 5 to control their own path and ensure that students have the opportunities they need to succeed.

Cosponsored Education Legislation:

H.R. 3421 – A PLUS Act
I cosponsored this bill that would allow more financial freedom for individual states. This legislation, supported by the Heritage Foundation, would allow states to combine certain funds in order to improve students’ academic achievement.

H.R. 1089 – Native American Indian Education Act
This legislation fulfills our nation’s promise